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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First does anyone know where to buy a stroke counter? We have one but bought a second baler and would like to add one to it. The people who sold us our first no longer sell them or make them anymore.

The second question has to do with when the weather has beaten you up . Us up here in Ontario Canada have been taking a [email protected]&$ing!
We were so dry in April and May that the hay was behind. Then we started getting rain in June. We’ve had small windows to make very little hay. It rains every third day!! Myself I have 200 plus acres to do. Others around me have 200-500 acres to do and we are all in the commercial market. I’ve reached out to a guy that takes hay for mushrooms for compost.
Most of my hay is alfalfa/ Timothy blend. The hay is laying down , is going slimy and even when baled has a smell to it. It’s course .We hammered the acid to it to help with smell and palatability . One guy I know purchased a cheap used forage harvester to start chopping back on the field. To top it off the weather is showing crap for the next 10 days and second cut in what did in the beginning will start soon.
Would you guys still try and make the course smelling hay or cut and chop back on the field? I know people still need hay but what’s it like in the hay market everywhere else?
 

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First does anyone know where to buy a stroke counter? We have one but bought a second baler and would like to add one to it. The people who sold us our first no longer sell them or make them anymore.

The second question has to do with when the weather has beaten you up . Us up here in Ontario Canada have been taking a [email protected]&$ing!
We were so dry in April and May that the hay was behind. Then we started getting rain in June. We’ve had small windows to make very little hay. It rains every third day!! Myself I have 200 plus acres to do. Others around me have 200-500 acres to do and we are all in the commercial market. I’ve reached out to a guy that takes hay for mushrooms for compost.
Most of my hay is alfalfa/ Timothy blend. The hay is laying down , is going slimy and even when baled has a smell to it. It’s course .We hammered the acid to it to help with smell and palatability . One guy I know purchased a cheap used forage harvester to start chopping back on the field. To top it off the weather is showing crap for the next 10 days and second cut in what did in the beginning will start soon.
Would you guys still try and make the course smelling hay or cut and chop back on the field? I know people still need hay but what’s it like in the hay market everywhere else?
The weather's a bummer! I'd still cut & bale it and sell it but price it accordingly. More and more people are looking into building a hay drying system, but the cost is considerable and IMO worth only for the big hay producers who can amortize it over thousand of bales.
 

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I understand the principle of the operation of a stroke counter. Can someone explain the need for a stroke counter??
Sq balers were designed to operate at a rated rpm(540 or 1000) & yes in thin hay I've sq baled at less rpm's but what's the advantage of a stroke counter?
Thanks in advance, Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We use a stroke counter, 1: one inexperienced Baler operator to make sure he is making the same size bale consistently because both the Kuhn and know the Bale Baron we just purchased needs that same size bale. I guess they have just gotten comfortable with them .
We have a hay dryer using forced air but we can’t get the days of dry to even use it. I still need to be in the 15-22 % range and I can’t even get that. I get the price thing and will have to do that. I’m been selling out of the field for 10-12 cents a pound for rounds and big squares and small squares 14 cents a pound. Will definitely have to drop I just don’t know how how low?!
 

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Same mess for weather in Atlantic Canada, made some hay early June and been rain since. Have 100 acres or more all going to seed.
 

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I understand the principle of the operation of a stroke counter. Can someone explain the need for a stroke counter??
Sq balers were designed to operate at a rated rpm(540 or 1000) & yes in thin hay I've sq baled at less rpm's but what's the advantage of a stroke counter?
Thanks in advance, Jim
One of the best examples of using a stroke counter was on "North Texas Hay" YouTube channel. They were baling with a John Deere with IVT transmission and could "dial in" their ground speed using the stroke count. Sadly, the husband passed away a couple of years ago and I think the most recent video is about one year old.
 

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I have an Idaho Instruments stroke counter. Once I got it dialed in it works great. My wife and others bale for me and it’s just easy to tell them how many strikes per bale I like and they don’t have to guess. Thanks Brad a friend bale for me last week . He had never bales before and it made him look like a pro. You can call them direct.
 

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Idaho Instruments 208-733-5636. I had a bad cable to start with but their customer service was great . They sent me a new cable and all has been good since. There are a number of ways to mount the sensors so think that through good before mounting. You of course don’t have to mount them exactly like their pictures are . I found some other ideas here on Haytalk I think.
 
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