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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Curious if anyone could share information about the dilution rate. I've read the label a few times & searched different sites / forums. I havent found anything really clear. I have a 25 gallon tank. Fields vary in size 1 to 2 acres each. Any suggestions would be so appreciated thanks !
Per label \/
Apply 1 to 2.75 quarts of this product in 20 to 100 gallons of water per treated acre, (3/4 to 2 ounces per 1,000 square
feet). When using low-volume application equipment, 3 to 20 gallons of water per acre is acceptable
 

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Are you planning to use it for spot spraying with a hand wand or broadcast with a boom? If spot spraying, google mix rate for spot spraying, it is usually listed separately and often found in other publications.
 

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I spot spray @ 2.5-3 ou per gallon h2o with sticker
 

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First off, welcome to HT!

If you are spraying the whole field with the boom, the 'dilution ratio' is not what you need to key on.

What is your spray rate? As in, how many 'acres per gallons' are you putting down with your sprayer? That will tell you how many acres the tank will cover. (for example, if you are spraying 10 gallons per acre with 25 gallons of water in the tank, you will cover 2.5 acres).

I also presume you have calibrated your sprayer so you know your spray rate. If you don't, its pretty easy. You measure how much water (clean water) is coming out a single nozzle over a given amount of time. This will depend on your spray pressure and the size of the opening in the nozzle. Then figure out your planned ground speed. Then crunch some numbers to come up with your 'gallons per acre.' A quick google search will get more detailed directions to do a sprayer calibration.

As for chemicals, determine how much chemical you want to put down per acre. (As you said, your coop guy said 4-5 pints per acre.) So assume you go with the 4 pints per acre, and you are planning to cover 2.5 acres, you would add 10 pints to your spray tank as you fill it with water.

Mix well and go get 'em!
 

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4 to 5 pints sounds high the guy at the coop must own stock in a chemical company. We use 2/3 pint in spring of the LV6. It would depend on what you are trying to kill. Get the product and read the label or look up the label online if you know what product you are getting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I guess my question is how many gallons per acre for optimal coverage in broadcast application? Because I read anywhere from 3-100 gallons that's alot of gray area. Spray rate can adjusted and calibrated accordingly.
 

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I have a little 25 gallon fimco electric boom sprayer that I use for small paddocks. It does a great job. You need to carefully calibrate your sprayer based on the speed of your tractor, and the amount of spray coming out of your nozzles at a certain pressure. If you don't make the effort to calibrate your sprayer, you will either overspray or under spray and neither is a good situation. Calibrating a sprayer takes some effort, but you can do it. Go to YouTube and try to understand the simple process of calibrating a sprayer.
So if at X pressure and 1000 RPM in third gear (speed of the tractor) you are spraying 20 gallons per acre, then you need to put in the right amount of herbicide in so that the 20 gallons will spread (1 QT?) uniformly over your acre.
Frankly, if you're not willing to make the effort to calibrate your sprayer, you shouldn't be spraying.
 

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Optimal coverage depends on spray tips and pressure and size and density of the weeds to be sprayed. I am running flat fan nozzles at 40 psi with 15 gallons per acre and that seems to be a pretty good compromise for most herbicides. Some of the new spray tips give better coverage.
 

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I spray at 20 gallons to the acre. For me, that is the blue nozzle tips from Tractor Supply, 30 psi pressure, and a target of 4.0 mph ground speed. (The packaging for the nozzle tips comes with a small spec sheet of theoretical nozzle output for various pressures and the formula for figuring out gallons per acre.) Of the three variables, consistent and accurate ground speed is the most important. You can change the pressure +/- 5 psi and it won't have a huge change on your gallons per acre. Small changes in ground speed will.

I agree with Edd in Ky,, sprayer calibration is definitely needed if this is your first time out spraying.
 

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All good posts above.....you need to know your spray volume per acre.....I calculated mine then went out with pure water and tested and adjusted till I knew what pressure and ground speed equaled 20gpa .......then I went to the label to get my per acre chemical to mix in....
 

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I assume you are aware that Dicamba can drift across the fence (under certain conditions) and kill your neighbors plants accidentally? I believe it is now restricted in some states due to neighbor conflicts. I don't know all the details, but carefully check to be sure you are not in doing something to your neighbor that you would not want done to you. I am very careful how, what, where and when I spray around my farm to be sure I don't accidentally kill my wife's flowers and vegetables.
 

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Not likely to drift near as much in spring and fall. Summertime volatilization is the main threat(high temps/humidity). Typically, it takes less chemical in the fall as the weeds are taking the herbicide down into the root for winter storage. I use 2 pints of Brash(2-4d/dicamba) to the acre for broadleaves in the fall. I get better longterm results in the fall than I do in the spring. I sprayed this mixture here last week. The main culprit I was spraying for was plantain.

Regards, Mike
 

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The concern is that once people select a herbicide, they tend to ignore the "certain conditions " warnings in the label. Here in tobacco country, ,as a good neighbor, I try not to spray in the heat of late spring and summer, even though that is the ideal time to kill cocklebur, ragweed, Hemp dogbane and Queen Anne's Lace. My fields suffer a little, but my friendship is more important. Sad that in Arkansas it resulted in gunfire.
 
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