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Anyone know if you have to bend the tabs to remove and inspect friction disks?
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Screw the nuts all the way down to compress the internal springs. Pay attention where the plate you have circled is located so you put it back into the same notch. Then bend the indented portion of the hub outward so the components can be removed from the housing.
 

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Mike
Can you please explain the easiest method for bending the retaining parts of clutch housing to free plates?
Thanks, Jim
 

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They do make a special tool, but a long punch and hammer will get the job done. The bend is not much more than 1/8”
 

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I would think hub that was designed to attach to shaft would be in the path of a punch.
Thanks, Jim
 

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You do not need to go straight in with the punch. The photo makes it look harder than what it is.
 

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What I have seen is a bar with to plates welded to the bar. The gap between the two bars fits over the side of the clutch and you just rotate the bar to pull the invention out. Easily made and I think I did make one years ago. The tool you show must be the latest and greatest.
 

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Looks the same as the one on my Krone EC 3200. I burned up the plates several times and had to rebuild it 2-3 times. The tabs bend easy with a punch and hammer, I got to the point I could rebuild it in about 30 minutes. I used the cheap China friction discs that the local farm supply had, they cost about a 1/3rd of the stocks discs, but they weren't lasting me long. I ended up just replacing the entire unit with a more traditional, and easier to adjust outer multi-spring system. Look at the housings where the discs make contact. Mine were worn with a cupped like surface, not letting the discs make good contact. I think the plates would slip and eventually wear into making good contact, but then the tolerances were off too far for the spring to hold enough tension. The amount of tension is controlled by the color/number of washer springs, and my unit already was at the limit for that small clutch. I think the newer units went to the bigger housing with 2 more discs. Anyway, I decided to abandon the Walterscheid washer spring design and have not had any issues since.
 
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