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I've been on the farm my whole life. I've been running my own corn/soybean operation, in addition to some custom baling for several years now. Just looking to see if anyone has any advice, that they were told or found help full over the years? I would love to hear it, pertaining to custom baling or general farming.

Thanks!
 

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I've been on the farm my whole life. I've been running my own corn/soybean operation, in addition to some custom baling for several years now. Just looking to see if anyone has any advice, that they were told or found help full over the years? I would love to hear it, pertaining to custom baling or general farming.
Thanks!
Set a minimum for bales per acre....hth
 

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All of the above posts are real good. All I can add is don't get in over your head, be practical, remember its not how much money you turn over it is how much you get to keep. Also took me years to learn that quality beats quanity every time.
 

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All the above are good advice. I'd also say check with your NRCS office about EQUIP and CSP programs to help you achieve any conservation goals you have in mind with your land. They have some great programs to help beginning farmers. FSA also have some pretty good incentives for beginning farmers to borrow money for land purchases.
 

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Diversify all that is possible.

Regards, Mike
Mike you should of told my Ag/FFA instructors that in high school.They were pushing to specialize and get big in one enterprise.It was very common of that era,mid 70's that a guy miled 20 cows,had 50 beef,and farrow to finished 500 pigs per yr,Many did and ended up spending a lot of $ expanding one enterprise just to have that price crash.They were the first to fail in the 80's.No diversification to even out some price swings betweem commodities.

We were told to "Get big or get out"
 

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I agree with diversifying. But looking around the farms in my neighborhood, there is very little diversification. Lots of mono-crop or mono speciation. That is still being taught, and its hard for young farmers not to listen when they see big timers driving new 1 ton pickups and plowing corn fields with 1/2 million dollar tractors.

Live below your means and don't do something just because of how someone else is.
 

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ive been in the beginning stages for going on 4 years now. started small and slowly worked up. I had to and still have to remember not to get in over my head. take on only what you can handle. I started with my future father in law and now I basically took it over....it can be stressful. some of the locals around here can be the hardest to get good info from. several have told me what I found out to be wrong (trial and error) I don't know nearly enough to feel comfortable giving advise. But if I had to say anything itd be to keep on keeping on. and crawl before you run
 

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I agree with diversifying. But looking around the farms in my neighborhood, there is very little diversification. Lots of mono-crop or mono speciation. That is still being taught, and its hard for young farmers not to listen when they see big timers driving new 1 ton pickups and plowing corn fields with 1/2 million dollar tractors.

Live below your means and don't do something just because of how someone else is.
Driving something and owning are two differant things
 

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If you have baler twine, duct tape, a tin can, and a realllllllly biggggg hammer, with a bit of patience you can fix a lot things lol. A fellow member named panhandle had a very memorable quote "patience is a bitter cup that only the strong can drink from." Strength comes from knowledge never stop learning
 

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Mike you should of told my Ag/FFA instructors that in high school.They were pushing to specialize and get big in one enterprise.It was very common of that era,mid 70's that a guy miled 20 cows,had 50 beef,and farrow to finished 500 pigs per yr,Many did and ended up spending a lot of $ expanding one enterprise just to have that price crash.They were the first to fail in the 80's.No diversification to even out some price swings betweem commodities.

We were told to "Get big or get out"
Yep, here we run beef cows, make hay and do row crops and plow snow in the winter and also do a little machine work in the shop during any slow times or in the winter.

Often more than not when row crops are barely breaking even I'm making money on hay, when hay seems to be too low to be worth it row crops are up, etc.
 
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I agree with everyone who says to diversify. You can't never have to many ways to make money. Also look outside the box. We make alot of hay, cattle, poultry houses, spread litter, custom work, snow pushing in winter, and I've been known to haul cattle and hay for people. Also don't let anybody discourage you. Be prepared for alot of stress. It's hard to make a living farming full time. I've done it all my life but it sure is hard.
Sometimes you have to spend money to make money too, just be sure to spend it on the right things. ( fertilizer, seed, genetics are good things) shiny new paint is also when warrenty and tax advantages are factored in, but not when your ego is calling the shots.
 
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