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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since my Dad's estate is finally settled I have acquired an additional 180 acres. I plan on haying it all for now. This year I sold all I had to sell after I kept my 350 rolls, sold 300 with the ability to sell up to 1,000. With hay test it only tested in the fair range and I received $30/roll, plan to do better this year. Now my customers are wanting theirs net wrapped. So I know that there is some on here that are better at numbers and with more experience than me, there are two NH 460 balers that I'm looking at in the 27K range. Will this pencil out rolling 1300-1400 bales a year. I'm keeping 400 and selling the rest. I have been doing a lot of research on the advantages of net vs twine and though net is better, will it pay off. Just don't want to die of heavy metal disease.
 

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How many acres previously? 180 is a large one time jump. Going to be a whole different ball game with the weather. Asking about net one assumes you twine only? I switched from twine to net will never go back. Just that alone would speed up your process considerably. Net and twine was same price for me $1/bale.
 

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Unless your in an area where everyone uses and likes twine bales, I’d never go twine for that many bales. I haven’t priced round bale twine for a few years but last time I did it was just as expensive per bale as net wrap like IH 1586 says. Plus it adds significant time and fuel cost to the baling process. I switched from twine to net years ago and I bet it sped up my productivity by at least 50% while baling, plus less storage loss. So the higher cost of a net wrap baler is going to pay for itself pretty quick with that many bales.

I don’t know the bale count on those balers you mention but given it’s a current production model and with as crazy as prices have gotten, I’d assume they are at least broken in by now. Which may be more than fine, balers can last a long time. But just might need some upgrades or maintenance to be in top shape for that many bales per year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Previously was doing 100 acres with a NH 650 twine, it took awhile :( now its going to be 250. One of the 460's has 10K bales the other 11K. Just FYI I bought 20,000 ft. big ball twine last year for $22.00/ball.
 

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Be a long time since we used twine for round bales but I think you save 20 to 30 seconds a bale net verses twine figure time, fuel, wear and storage loss net is worth it
 

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Several things to consider:

First, net wrap bales keep better, handle better, look better than twine bales. These means they sell better. If cost is really a concern, twine your own bales, net wrap bales for sale.

Second, with that many bales, you will have years that you sell everything, years that you sell maybe 50%, so net wrap will help with carry over.

Third, 180 acres is a LOT of ground to hay. Consider bale size as a serious performance factor. 4x6 vs 5x6 bales means about 25% more hay per bale on a 5x6. This translates into roughly 25% less time handling. So, unless your customers demand 4x6, consider 5x6.

Fourth, don't go a full 6' on either a 4x6 or 5x6 bale. From my experience, it's way to easy to over stuff a bale, resulting in stretched of broken belts. (I go 5x62" on quality hay because that fits exactly edge to edge in my hay barn. For cattle quality stored outside, I go 5x66".)

Fifth, 4x6 may be better for hauling because you won't have to mess with oversized loads. Just something to consider.

Finally, I had some baled at 4x62" when my baler was down last year. I'm feeding 4 4'x62" bales where I would normally feed 3 5'x62" bales. More work to feed. More net wrap to dispose of.

Hope this helps.

Ralph
 

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Ditto what Ralph stated. 6 ft diameter rd bales double stacked in height on trailer won't fit under some bridges/overpasses. Rd baling with net vs twine requires 25% less time, net also saves fuel & wear on baler.
 

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How many bales on the NH 460s? Also what year are they? 1500 bales a year is a walk in the park for those balers. I would go with the net. Upfront cost is easily recouped, if only in much better resale value.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One of the balers is a 2014 with 10K bales $27.500 the other is a 2016 with 11,125 bales for $26,900. I'm looking for those with both net and twine and my reasoning is if the net system goes down I have the twine backup to finish the field, since I understand the on these models the systems are separate.
 

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It is just what you feel like doing when you get up in the morning!😀 I highly recommend the twine and net be on the baler. In case you run out of one, you can use the other. This might be a discussion by itself, but I have used several brands of net, and still come back to Vermeer. I like the bigger web for hauling, and feeding some 3 year old hay now, and it is still holding together, didn't break down from the sun. Rained on hay is worse then nice hay in net or twine. I can't argue the point of twine for home use. Especially if you know you are going to feed a set amount. My net costs about 2 dollars a bale, 5 x 6 baler. I have used the plastic biodegradable twine, as it will last longer then sisal twine. I don't think you will regret either of those balers. Do you have a good tractor to spend time in? If the tractor doesn't work, no bales will get made!😎
 
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