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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just kind of spitballing here, but I have a 7 acre field that is a hot mess. The ground is very bumpy, but add to that it's full of small craters in certain spots where a homeowner used to have small trees planted that died and were removed. I have spent hours and loader load after loader load trying to fill all those holes. On top of that, there are three different areas in the field where the ground just drops off a good 8 inches or so, almost across the entire length of the field. Looks like it might have been a fenceline at one point.

I am wondering if this were to get tilled up, smoothed, and reseeded, if it would level out all the craters and holes, and smooth out those sudden transitions in elevation. You can imagine what it does to a tedder every time I go up or down those areas.

I cannot use herbicides on 5 acres of it. The field is two different parcels owned by different people. When it comes to soil tillage, you won't find anybody more ignorant than me. Is it possible without burning it down, and what all would be required to achieve my desired results. I'd have to have it custom tilled and seeded.
 

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If you can lay your hands on an old spring tooth harrow, they do more for the problem described than most other things I am aware of. If you don't have a chisel plow or regular plow and a disc, you need to get it tilled first then keep working it in diagonal passes with the spring tooth harrow. It will grow rocks however if you have rock issues. If you have a 3 pt seeder/fertilizer spreader you could plant oats afterwards to keep it from eroding then till it again after cutting the oats off next year
 
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I’ve been fixing the same sort of fields. Plow then harrow harrow harrow then harrow some more, then when you’re sick of harrowing, harrow some more.

We ran the s-tine about 10 passes then c-tine drag harrow another 3-4 times.
 

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I’ve been fixing the same sort of fields. Plow then harrow harrow harrow then harrow some more, then when you’re sick of harrowing, harrow some more.

We ran the s-tine about 10 passes then c-tine drag harrow another 3-4 times.
spot on.....had a field like that too.........we added several passes with a land plane (pulled box blade)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I suppose I could plow up the worst spots and then harrow those or smooth with a box blade.

Does the type of teeth on the harrow matter? My grandpas estate has an old JD 18’ harrow I could buy for $150. But I don’t know what teeth it has.
 

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Recently had a similar project on 3 acres that was a 100 year old pecan grove. Trees had died, we had them dug up, burned and then starting prepping the ground to add on to our hay field. We bottom plowed it, followed with multiple discings and then finished off with a cultivator. As mentioned above, disc until you're sick of it and then disc a few more times. If you go the bottom plow route make sure you have someone knowledgeable assist in setting up the bottom plow; if not set up correctly a bottom plow can make a bigger mess than what you start with. I would also recommend playing with your disc settings as this will help further remove the ridges after the bottom plowing. Our final couple of passes were made with a perfecta II cultivator with the rolling baskets on the back. Left a nice smooth finish across the entire 3 acres. It was a lot of work but worth the effort.
 

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I would chisel plow once long ways then a second time short way then heavy harrow. I guess it all depends if you have a chisel plow or not. A disk would work but a chisel plow works deeper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don’t have any tillage equipment. I’d have to have it custom tilled.
 

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I leveled 13 acres after vineyard was removed. Vines in 6x10 foot pattern removed with a big excavator . Piled with a dozer and brush rake. Wholes 3 foot across by by 1 to 2 foot deep. Plus it was wet and dang near lost the excavator in 2 places. So a trench where the tracks where, as it skidded on frame pulled with the boom to get it out.

My old Cat D6 and 15 shank IH chisel plow. Stayed in 2nd gear about 2.5 mph and straddled the wholes as best possible the first pass. After the first pass not bad on a Cat, wheel tractor would not of been so good. Three passes with chisel in crossing or diagonal to last pass. Then 4 more passes with heavy field cultivator with harrows in different directions back and forth each pass. Smooth enough for hay but way to much steel from trellis yet.
 

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The most effective, commonly available tool I’ve found for leveling rough ground is a field cultivator. May need a disc pass first to loosen the dirt. A finisher (disc in front, field cultivator in the back) would work really well too. Several passes at different angles should get things pretty smooth.
 
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