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So you would say rolls are definitely a better option than flails?
You didn't ask me but I think you will find little if any difference in end results in dry down if the rolls are adjusted correctly....rolls do exhibit lower leaf loss on legumes though...at least that's been our experience specificly with JD machines......also agree and concur with post #18
 

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So you would say rolls are definitely a better option than flails?
Keep in mind we have never run flails so I have no experience with them, but with the varied crops and crop conditions we have here I wouldn’t even consider flails. Could be that flails are equal to or a little better than rollers in grass that is more leafy like second cut but then again I have not seen later cuttings of grass be hard to dry anyway with the exception of orchard grass. I’m not sure flails would help there at all.
 

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Do you think NH Chevron rolls would help dry down in second / third cutting as well ? What type of machine are you running?
I’m just going to say that the NH rubber chevron roll is considerably better than nothing but there are better roll conditioning systems out there. We went from that to the Massey/Heston TwinMax conditioner which I found was a big improvement. I have read that Deere also has conditioning roll systems that can rival the TwinMax for dry down.
 

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I’m just going to say that the NH rubber chevron roll is considerably better than nothing but there are better roll conditioning systems out there. We went from that to the Massey/Heston TwinMax conditioner which I found was a big improvement. I have read that Deere also has conditioning roll systems that can rival the TwinMax for dry down.
Don't know about JD, but I concur with the Massey-Hesston TwinMax, hard to beat.
 

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When i bought my Vermeer MC840 4 years ago it was my first conditioner. It has the paddle conditioner on it with a conditioning bar bolted to a adjustable hood.. If memory serves me right the Kuhn fail conditioner had a "comb" the fails pushed the crop through. With the conditioner set a full intensity i can crack johnsongrass stems at regular intervals. I don't think just a hood would do the trick, but then again no experience with one. I am very happy with what i have.
 

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We have two mower conditioners. The oldest one is a Hesston with rubber on steel crimping rolls and it does an excellent job. The newer mower conditioner is a Krone 2801cv - exactly like Rick (Hayman1) has. It has very agressive impellers and I have mine set about 1 inch off the hood. In very heavy, very stemmy first cut hay (timothy, OD and fescue) it is generally a 3 day cut to bale window. If anything the Krone is slightly better than the Hesston and I've cut side by side. I liken the impeller conditioning like this - it rubs the hay together, slings it hard against the tread plate hood, the aggressive impellers (krone) probably beat the heck out of the grass too, but you really don't see damage like the crimp from the Hesston - however the outcome is like taking a fresh loaf of bread out of the wrapper and setting it in the sun. The dry down from the impellers on the Krone is amazing and fast.

My 2 cents...

Bill
 
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