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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I may hoe just half of one of my fields that I'm not overseeding, just to assess the aeration/fertilizer incorporation potential, to see if it is noticeably different than the other half of the field.

Will be hard to assess if it helps with seeding because the fields that are being overseeded will be hoed in their entirety and if the seed takes well, will be impossible to know if the hoe had anything to do with it.
 

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Interested in hearing how it goes. I've had the same thought with seeding and aeration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Josh, how about leaving a few test strips? We will be waiting with bated breath.
That's a good idea. I might leave a strip right down the middle unaltered in one of the fields. That would just show if there's any benefit to the aeration and fertilizer incorporation. Honestly I don't think it will be much, if any, but I will get my drone up in the air and if the difference is observable then you guys are all going to be running out to find you a hoe.

I'm frost seeding my pastures, and I can leave a part un-hoed to see if the seeding takes worse. I've never had any overseeding take on these pastures so I don't have high hopes this time either. I think I need to get soil pH and fertility improved. But maybe the pasture just needs a good hoe down first.

Then in April I will be burning off a field, hoeing it, and then overseeding it with a late maturing OG with my Brillion. Probably no control group there as seed is expensive and I want to maximize germination and yield.
 

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That's a good idea. I might leave a strip right down the middle unaltered in one of the fields. That would just show if there's any benefit to the aeration and fertilizer incorporation. Honestly I don't think it will be much, if any, but I will get my drone up in the air and if the difference is observable then you guys are all going to be running out to find you a hoe.
That will drive the price up on them. lol There is an international hoe for $1400. Didn't even take a 2nd look
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
That will drive the price up on them. lol There is an international hoe for $1400. Didn't even take a 2nd look
There were two hoes in my area (actually there’s a lot more than that if you go downtown) and one was $350 and one was $450. Even at those prices they’d been sitting on them forever. I got the $450 one because it folded and gave him $350 for it. The guy in your area asking $1400 is out of his mind.

When buying these things you have to keep in mind the option of reselling if it doesn’t work out for you. I already knew I’d have to sell for really cheap if I wanted to get rid of it so therefore wasn’t prepared to pay much to begin with.
 

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How an implement that was designed to operate in "softer type soil" that has been recently planted to a crop such as Cotton or Corn seedlings to break crust if soil has received hard rain so tender plants can emerge or remove small weeds/grass will do much for soil aeration is a mystery to me. I can't envision the tiny, shallow divot that rotary hoe point will create will be much aid in planted seed germination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
How an implement that was designed to operate in "softer type soil" that has been recently planted to a crop such as Cotton or Corn seedlings to break crust if soil has received hard rain so tender plants can emerge or remove small weeds/grass will do much for soil aeration is a mystery to me. I can't envision the tiny, shallow divot that rotary hoe point will create will be much aid in planted seed germination.
Jim you may be right. According to Virginia Tech you need a hole 1-6 inches deep for for aeration, but machines that remove plugs of soil rather than solid spikes will aerate better, as they say solid spikes can actually lead to compaction (as would be the case with a roto hoe). In sod the hoe doesn't tear up small weeds but just makes a bunch of little holes. I don't think it would be effective for aeration and that's not really my main goal. In fact sounds like it could actually be a bad idea.

For seed germination, I'm not planting seed, I'm drop seeding with my Brillion and packing it, but it's not on tilled ground, just a burned or scalped field or frost seeding, so I'm trying to increase seed to soil contact. Now that's something I've seen Mike suggest as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I had my first hoe down tonight. I did my pastures so I can frost seed them. The ground has been pretty wet and is drying out enough to where it’s just soft now.

As you can see from the pics the hoe did a nice job making lots of little pockets for the seed to fall into and have some soil contact.

It definitely does zing things. I went over a few sticks and they flew about 10 feet up in the air behind me. I was going about 6 mph and that’s about all the faster I could go as the pastures are fairly small. This is definitely not convenient for small areas as you have to lift it up when taking corners.

It is a pain in the ass to hook up and unhook so there will be a learning curve there.


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I didn't see it mentioned, but in one of the pictures posted, you see a hoe with a fancy expanded metal guard, about the width of the tractor cab. Rotary hoes like to throw rocks, hard and fast. They will take out a cab window and or add a lump to your head, quick. They also can throw stuff straight back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I was unable to frost seed because it snowed the very next day after hoeing the pastures. Now the holes are pretty much closed up. So it needs to be something done immediately prior to seeding, which is a bummer because I'm not going to have another opportunity where the ground is firm enough but soft enough to hoe it again prior to frost seeding while the ground is frozen. This has been such a weird transition to spring.
 
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