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I have a New Holland Prorotor 3114 and all of sudden in the last 2 weeks I have had 4 of the 11 teeth shear off. Even after being welded back together they seem to break again within a day or 2. I bought this rake used last spring and used it all last year with no problems but only started using it this year about two months ago towards the tail end of my first cutting. Each arm seems to shear off in exactly the same spot and same way. I thought maybe they just wore out over time and would break but it seems like if that was the case they would all break over a few years as opposed to within a few weeks. I also thought it was possible I was running the rake too low but even with the rake barely touching the top of the grass and leaving some hay behind I still have had some arms break. Anyway anyone with more experience then me I would appreciate the thoughts and advice as the replacement arms are pretty pricey and I don't want to buy new parts if I don't know why the arms are breaking. I have attached an image of a broken arm and a good arm still on the rake (I drew a line in purple where all the arms brake at).
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I’m guessing fatigue failures. Once steel (or any material for that matter) gets to the point of fatigue, breakages happen pretty regularly. I would think the failure rate will resemble a bell curve.

Simply welding won’t fix them as the steel in the general area of your mark is affected by the repetitive flexing.
 
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How about continuing that piece of steel that holds it on or even weld a piece on the other side to reinforce it, you could go as far as you wanted as long as it's not in the way of anything. It's kinda hack but they're breaking anyway so not much to lose.
 

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Years ago when I owned a Vermeer R23 rake I had one of the pipes break that holds baskets in the spread out raking position These pipes adjusted raking width of gathered hay. I had local welder repair the the pipe by welding the pieces back together. He then welded 90° several beads very close together 2''-3'' long around circumference of pipe across the 1st weld that had rejoined the broken pieces of pipe. I operated rake for several more yrs & pipe never broke while I owned the rake
 

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I have one of these rakes (in different paint and double rotor configuration) and it has been absolutely abused in its past life. Welds everywhere. I have broken multiple arm shafts in the rotors which is way less fun than breaking external arms. I have, however, never broken what you’re breaking (have bent some arms but never in that location) and there’s no evidence among the rake’s battle scars that it has been an issue in the past. And that’s the long way of my saying this shouldn’t be normal or expected and there has to be (or had to be before you bought it) some abnormal wear or misuse causing this. If you’re absolutely sure there is nothing contacting anything anywhere (including making sure the stubs/inner arms for those particular arms aren’t bent down causing them to run into the ground when the rest are at appropriate height) then I would buy new arms and run it assuming the issue was something the previous owner set in motion. Also you should definitely check part numbers and compare prices, if you could find NOS vicon/kvernland (not too likely in the US but not impossible) that would probably be cheapest but outside of that Kubota painted arms are probably cheaper than NH arms.
 

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I had a similar rake, the arms looked just like that. When the guards were folded up, they hit the bars right where yours broke. If it were used with the guards folded for long, the bars would break. In some conditions it would be hard to hear the problem.
 

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I am not familiar with your piece of equipment but I repair all kinds and I would find a piece of cold roll or hot roll that fits snug in the pipe 6 or 8 inches long drill 4 holes on each side of the break put the cold roll inside of the pipe use the holes you drilled to anchor the cold roll slide the other piece over it and use the holes you drilled to align it then put a couple hot passes around where the break was and it will be much stronger than the pipe was to start with. Use about a 5/16" bit. I would also see if I could find the problem first it may of not been lined up with the other arms as in low.
 
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