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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, my first post here.. been lurking for a while. I’m new to all of this so I’m learning on the fly. So I just purchased 30 acres early in the year. I would like to prepare it for hay production. I’m in north Texas just a little west of Greenville Texas. The land has been used for cattle for years I would guess, so it has been packed down and is full of weeds with some Bermuda in it. I plan on having someone come sprig the grass next year. My question is, should I disk the ground or should I plow it and disk it before I sprig it? I have a 60hp tractor so I am not sure if it’s enough to do this. I might have to find someone that has the equipment. I did spray it with dura core to help keep the weeds down but I think it’s pretty over run with weeds. That’s my plan. Just wondering if it’s in the right direction and if so should I plow or plow and disk? Thanks all


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I'm going to be the dummy here....what the heck is "sprig"

I prep seeding grass fields by spraying roundup...fertilizing...discing...Harrow then seeding

About any tractor will pull equipment correctly sized to the machine...plow...disc...etc
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Instead of seeding they use a machine to come plant sprigs of Bermuda. I was told it’s called sprig or sprigging? Like I said I’m learning on the fly so I might have used the wrong term.


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Welcome to HayTalk av8tr72. Glad you came out of hiding and joined in our conversations. And for both you and
[U]ttazzman[/U], the hybrid bermudagrasses that are common to the Southern states do not produce viable seed, but spread by rhizomes (underground runners) and stolons (aboveground runners) both of which put down roots at internodes along these runners. Sprigs are cuttings of these stolons, rhizomes, roots and above-ground stems and leaves that are dug up, piled on a trailer, and taken to a newly prepared field where they are loaded into a sprigger that drops them into a slit in a prepared seedbed in moist soil where they are covered with soil that then is roller packed to preserve moisture. Immediately following placing the sprigs into the soil, an herbicide is applied to delay weed seed germination.
It is best to sprig into a well prepared seedbed. That means applying Glyphosate to remove any existing vegetation, and then thoroughly disking and possibly dragging to prepare a good seedbed. Sprigging these hybrid bermudagrasses is best done in late winter for Coastal bermudagrass and late spring/early summer for Tifton 85 bermudagrass. The Texas AgriLife Extension Service has several publications available for downloading from a Google search that will assist you in establishing a hybrid bermudagrass from sprigs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So spray with Glyphosate, disk it up real well. Sprig it and then apply herbicide in late fall. Sounds like a game plan. The more I read the deeper down the rabbit hole you go. That’s what I was looking for a basic guideline on where to start. Right now I have been trying to keep it mowed and keep the weeds at bay.
Thanks for all of the info!


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