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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone here tried to fabricate the plunger rails once they get worn? How did it turn out? Just want to hear what the experiences are from the more experienced ones since I will be replacing the plunger bearings soon and will try to assess the condition of those rails once I get the plunger out.

Thank again!
 

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Some rails are very simple. Some more complicated. I would think it depends which you want to make. But maybe repairing yours is an option too.
I would look at new rails though. Some are available aftermarket for a price that’s difficult to justify making your own.
 

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Maybe a stupid thought but can you flip them? I know when I did the plunger rebuild on my NH 269 the rails look like a rectangle bar. Could almost rotate them 180 degrees and bolt them back in for a fresh edge. I didn't need to so I don't know if it's even possible.
 

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Last time I did them the price was good enough that it wasn't worth trying to fabricate yourself. If I remember right some are thicker than others. And don't forget to count any shims behind them. Might have to buy new ones if old ones aren't reusable.
 

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I doubt plunger rails are anything special. If there is welding involved during fabrication, I would just use plain old 1018 steel.
 

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Looking from the back of the baler there are two rails which get the majority of the wear, the lower right vertical rail And the upper left rail. Neither of which I would attempt to make. The lower right vertical rail because you would not save much. There are two rails available for the upper left rail, the standard rail which your baler came with and a hardened rail which I would recommend you install. If there are no grooves worn in the two bottom flat rails there is no reason to replace them. I do not think the rails are made from common steel.

You can switch the upper and lower wear blocks with no problem and you will have a new wear surface since the block that was on top does not wear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Looking from the back of the baler there are two rails which get the majority of the wear, the lower right vertical rail And the upper left rail. Neither of which I would attempt to make. The lower right vertical rail because you would not save much. There are two rails available for the upper left rail, the standard rail which your baler came with and a hardened rail which I would recommend you install. If there are no grooves worn in the two bottom flat rails there is no reason to replace them. I do not think the rails are made from common steel.

You can switch the upper and lower wear blocks with no problem and you will have a new wear surface since the block that was on top does not wear.
Thanks, Mike. How can I tell if it is the hardened or the standard?
 
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