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An ounce of doing is worth a pound of talk
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard that cattle get a resistance to Noromectin, and therefore one should switch out every few years with Ivomec pour-on. Have any of you guys heard this? Opinions?
 

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Yes. In fact it is not cattle but parasites that end up being resistant to whatever you use. Better use a different molecule every time.

If you are running a cow calf operation I would strongly suggest selection against that trait.
 

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An ounce of doing is worth a pound of talk
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes. In fact it is not cattle but parasites that end up being resistant to whatever you use. Better use a different molecule every time.

If you are running a cow calf operation I would strongly suggest selection against that trait.
Last year I did use Noromectin, and yes I should of said parasites. I guess I should change to Ivomec for this year. It just cost more.
 

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They're both ivermectin. You're changing who you are giving your money to, but not the drug. You need to change the active ingredient, and more frequently than every few years.
 

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If the parasites are resistant to ivermectin they’ll be resistant to doramectin and noramectin.
As far as I know, there is no scientific research available to back up that claim. Moxidectin is yet another option for the OP, it works for internal and external parasites and has less environmental impact. If money is not an obstacle, get Eprinomectin which is an extended release molecule and lasts for 150 days.

As for Amitraz, it works only for external parasites.
 

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As far as I know, there is no scientific research available to back up that claim. Moxidectin is yet another option for the OP, it works for internal and external parasites and has less environmental impact. If money is not an obstacle, get Eprinomectin which is an extended release molecule and lasts for 150 days.

As for Amitraz, it works only for external parasites.
There really isn’t a lot of research papers in general about agricultural parasites. I’ve done plenty of research and if a certain parasite is resistant to a chemical ivermectin anything else that is a derivative will or is already resistant. If the parasite became resistant to ivermectin how is doramectin going to be better when it’s a derivative of the same thing. Slow release stuff is even worse because the parasite has more time to adapt to it.
 
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