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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I have had a neighbor helping me troubleshoot the missed ties on my 575. This gentleman has extensive baler experience and puts up 15,000 or so small squares a year. As we were going through the list of possible issues he commented on how the knotter assembly seemed loose where it is held into the lower position. There is a pin that goes through a hole in the knotter frame into a slotted bracket. See the attached picture. That arrangement allows the knotter to move up and down a quarter inch or so. He thought that might be throwing things off and suggested putting a bolt through it and locking it down tight instead of leaving the Pin with the movement. That makes me a little uncomfortable however. Clearly the machine was designed with this
Plant Wood Red Window Art

movement in mind, otherwise it would have a locking mechanism like a bolt. Furthermore, if it is supposed to have movement and now doesn’t I worry that something else will either prematurely wear or fail. What do you all think? The area in question is in the upper center of the photo, and you can see the hairpin through the bolt on the right side of the bracket. Also, if you look at the twine holder spring, there is just a bolt and no spring on the other side. The manual clearly shows a bolt passing through and then a coil spring and a nut. Is this the way it supposed to be? Thanks oh, and by the way the problem I’m having is a knot on line number two and line number one pulling out. We sharpen the knives, realigned the twine fingers, timing is all correct, changed the twine from old sisal to new sisal. Won’t be able to check it out again until we get a few days of dry weather, which at this pace maybe never. Thanks again
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
New Holland does not tighten the knotters frames where the pins are. I have not seen this to be a problem, but I do weld the notches in the frame mount if they get too deep.

There is no spring on the twine holder spring bolt. The spring you are referring to is the one shown below the twine holder bolt.

The twine holder is probably worn out or the flat spring may have a crack. Remove the flat spring and rotate the knotter frame up. With the flat spring removed you can move the twine holder out of the twine disc. The twine holder should have a continuous arc with not notches or shoulders. Replace the twine holders and the flat spring.

Baling too tight can also cause the twine to pull out of the twine disc, but probably the twine holder..
Thanks Mike. I really appreciate the advice. When I went down to look at the Baylor before I bought it I took several bales of really nice dry hair from last year and it tied fine. When I got the unit home and went to bale, The hay was wet and the bells were incredibly tight. The only ones that actually tied weighed about 80 pounds apiece. The Baylor was really pounding too. I wonder if that’s part of the problem as well. What do you think? I completely loosened the bale chamber cranks And the side doors. when we worked on it in the driveway feeding into it it actually looked like twine number one was being ripped apart. It took a lot of force to pull it back up through the bales. I wonder if it’s still just too wet and tight
 

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I Update: the baler worked flawlessly! I only had 10 acres to do and I put up just shy of 400 bales. I had zero trouble with the Baylor except for missing the wagon a few times with the thrower on the corners. I was out at 1 AM this morning picking up the stragglers :-(. Now is the fun part – unloading the wagons. It is just me so it takes a while. I got one unloaded today. I send 15 bales up the elevator, run up the loft, stack the bales And repeat. Again and again and again. I’m definitely getting my exercise! but it is sure a good feeling to finally get the hang in the barn
 
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