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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi HayTalk community it a great honor to be part of the community, my name is Peter Pinda and I'm from Tanzania Dodoma Africa, I have taken a great interest in the hay industry and would like learn more and since I leave in a semi arid country alfalfa has been my choice of hay to try t
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I’m sure you’ll be able to get one nice cutting dry land for sure maybe even two. Assuming the ground should hold all that moisture from 23in of rainfall. My neck of the woods is 17in of rain a year and we usually get 2 cuttings but we do get snow in the winter which really helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I’m sure you’ll be able to get one nice cutting dry land for sure maybe even two. Assuming the ground should hold all that moisture from 23in of rainfall. My neck of the woods is 17in of rain a year and we usually get 2 cuttings but we do get snow in the winter which really helps.
What is the production rate per acre and how does snow help there
 

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Yes. it would. If you can get ot established it will happily sit there through a long hot summer. As for irrigation and water requirements, it really depends whether your talking flood or spray. Flood uses around 1 megaliter per acre per watering. 2 watering 2 weeks apart per cut is required. As for spray, that also depends. I might use 8 laps of a pivot over a cut and that uses roughly 32 megs for 65ac. All depends on in crop rainfall as well. Trouble you will have is without irrigation during your dry season you will be trying to make hay during your wet season. Not ideal for curing as you will need 4 to 5 days after cutting. And that's without humidity. Watering in your dry season will give you the best opportunity to make good hay without weather damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes. it would. If you can get ot established it will happily sit there through a long hot summer. As for irrigation and water requirements, it really depends whether your talking flood or spray. Flood uses around 1 megaliter per acre per watering. 2 watering 2 weeks apart per cut is required. As for spray, that also depends. I might use 8 laps of a pivot over a cut and that uses roughly 32 megs for 65ac. All depends on in crop rainfall as well. Trouble you will have is without irrigation during your dry season you will be trying to make hay during your wet season. Not ideal for curing as you will need 4 to 5 days after cutting. And that's without humidity. Watering in your dry season will give you the best opportunity to make good hay without weather damage.
That's alot of water and what about tropical climatic condition does alfalfa thrive cause I been reading too much water is not good either
 

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Won't grow without it. But yes, too much and hot temperatures will lead to scalding or cooking the plants, particularly if the water ponds on the paddock for too long. I try to avoid watering in temperatures above 36°c with flood irrigation. Spray, can be more forgiving as you are not pending so much water during irrigation. You want to avoid watering if rain is due as well. Good drainage is imperative if you intend to irrigate.
 

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Alfalfa or LUCERNE as the rest of the world know it, grows from tropical Queensland to Tasmania here in Australia (Think from top to bottom of the country). Tassie might only get a couple of cuts whereas Queensland can see up to 11 cuts per year. That said, I find it enjoys a spell mid season to get good yields.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Alfalfa or LUCERNE as the rest of the world know it, grows from tropical Queensland to Tasmania here in Australia (Think from top to bottom of the country). Tassie might only get a couple of cuts whereas Queensland can see up to 11 cuts per year. That said, I find it enjoys a spell mid season to get good yields.
Really greatfull for the inside knowledge you gave me
 
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