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I'm a trial attorney in Kansas City. I'm in need of someone, preferably in the Pittsburg, Kansas area, who can provide expert consultation about the qualifications and duties of a hay hauler / driver and the complexity of grading and evaluating hay. Please contact [email protected] for additional information. Thanks!
 

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Well im sure someone would enjoy to do that. Heck if I was more knowledable and knew the ins and outs id surely spout off all the information I'm an expert in lol. But sure sounds like someone has there hands full.
 

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This sounds like an interesting case and the results and details of the case would be of interest to all of us here on haytalk. And complexity of grading hay. Wow. To determine that is going to be interesting because sometimes one person's good hay is another person's bad hay.
 

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Most dairy quality hay is sold as tested hay usually testing the RFV,HERE.

As far as untested hay there are some guidelines BUT what a seller consider primes hay and what a buyer considers prime hay can be 2 different things.Esp in the case of some horsey folk.On the other hand you have some includeing hay jockeys misrepresenting the hay,but in most cases they will only sell one time to a person.So as far as I know there are not any legal standards to go by with un tested hay.If a guy got some bad hay should of refused it and put on his black list is about all you can do.I've seen and heard of guys getting blacklisted at hay auctions for bad bales in the load or crooked weights.

SO if it was sold as tested hay or not it is 2 different deals.As far as legally speaking.

http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_circulars/CR-641.pdf
 

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Most dairy quality hay is sold as tested hay usually testing the RFV,HERE.

As far as untested hay there are some guidelines BUT what a seller consider primes hay and what a buyer considers prime hay can be 2 different things.Esp in the case of some horsey folk.On the other hand you have some includeing hay jockeys misrepresenting the hay,but in most cases they will only sell one time to a person.So as far as I know there are not any legal standards to go by with un tested hay.If a guy got some bad hay should of refused it and put on his black list is about all you can do.I've seen and heard of guys getting blacklisted at hay auctions for bad bales in the load or crooked weights.

SO if it was sold as tested hay or not it is 2 different deals.As far as legally speaking.

http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_circulars/CR-641.pdf
It would have to be a large amount of hay being potentially misrepresented to get to the point a trial attorney is needed.
 

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I'm a trial attorney in Kansas City. I'm in need of someone, preferably in the Pittsburg, Kansas area, who can provide expert consultation about the qualifications and duties of a hay hauler / driver and the complexity of grading and evaluating hay. Please contact [email protected] for additional information. Thanks!
Can you give us more information? By the way, I am not an expert at anything!
 

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Maybe some Low budget Hay Jockey hauled some hay across state lines for a customer said the hay was no good an didn't pay for and told the customer it's not his fault... OOOR chances are with a attorney involved there is a horse person in the picture some where.... Anyway hopefully the attorney will share the story with us when it is final, in the meantime it makes for good posts on the forum
 

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Cant you just see the "hay expert" in the courtroom. "Well the hay looked a little mature. And I gave it the sniff test. It sorta smelled ok, so I reached in and pulled some out. It looked like it might have been baled a little tough. Hard to say for sure though..." You would have to pay me a lot of money to get in the middle of this pissing match....
 

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Cant you just see the "hay expert" in the courtroom. "Well the hay looked a little mature. And I gave it the sniff test. It sorta smelled ok, so I reached in and pulled some out. It looked like it might have been baled a little tough. Hard to say for sure though..." You would have to pay me a lot of money to get in the middle of this pissing match....
I am just guessing that there must be a fair amount of money involved to make it worth an Attorney being hired. This is going to be interesting to watch.
 
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LOL You told that like you have been with me when selling hay to a horse Farm the only thing you forgot to mention was the pair of leather gloves in his back pocket an the apposing attorney ( OJ's attorney )yelling "THE GLOVE DON'T FIT...THE GLOVE DON'T SEE IT DON'T FIT "
 

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The alfalfa market in the west has grading rules doesn't it? Maybe an export case. Local guy ended up in a middle eastern jail for years over a load of misgraded potatoes.
 

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Pittsburgh Kansas might as well be considered in Missouri. Lot smaller operations over that way. Haven't seen a whole lot of hay move from that area, feel like a lot of their hay goes east. Big prairie hay country with lots of rainfall and of course lots of horse people in that populated part of the state.

Trey
 

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As Kansas was settled, the growing population supported a small community of lawyers. One lawyer became quite successful, handling disputes between ranchers and farmers. He sent his son away for college, and was pleased when his son returned after graduation, seeking to work in his office to figure out if he wanted to be a lawyer. The lawyer welcomed his son into the firm, and gave him a job as a clerk.

On his son's first day, the first client to call on the lawyer was a man,deeply tanned from years of toil under the Kansas sun. His hand were rough and calloused, and he was dressed for the range. The man explained, "I am a ranch hand at the Smith Ranch, where I have worked since I was very young. For all of those years, I have tended to all of the animals on the ranch, including a small herd of cows. I raised the cows, fed them, and cared for them. It has always been my understanding that I was the owner of the cows. Mr. Smith died, and his son has inherited the ranch. He believes that, as the cows were raised on his family's land and were fed his family's hay, that they are his cows. I need you to help me."

The lawyer smiled, and put his hand on the man's shoulder. "I have heard enough, and I will take your case. Don't worry about the cows." After expressing extreme gratitude, the workman left the lawyer's office.

A short time later, the next client arrived. He was young, and well-groomed, and appeared quite wealthy. He explained to the lawyer, "My name is Smith, and I own a ranch near here. For many years, one of my ranch hands has taken care of my family's herds, including some cows. The cows were raised on my land, fed my hay, and they are obviously my cows. Yet the hand believes that, as he raised them and cared for them, they are his. I would like to resolve the matter of the ownership of the cows.:

The lawyer smiled and said, "I have heard enough, and I will take your case. Don't worry about the cows."

After the man left the office, the lawyer's son came over to his father, looking puzzled. "I don't understand," he said. "I may not know much about the law, but it seems to me that there is a serious problem with the cows, and you just told both sides not to worry."

The lawyer replied, "I told them not to worry about the cows, son, and they shouldn't worry about the cows." Chuckling, the lawyer explained, "The cows will be ours."
 

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I would say maybe a bunch of high dollar horses got sick on some supposedly good hay provided not by a hay jockey, but by a farm that is worth something....... I haven't seen to many hay jockeys that have large assets. Mostly young guys and an old truck and trailer. Or new truck and trailer with hefty payments.
 
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