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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks PA, yes I read there are a lot of bearings on the plunger. I pulled my 336 plunger for new crank bushings and found 2 locked up bearings, I expect with the acid use this has had it would be good to check.

One thing I'm curious about, Agco touts these things as being made in the US but there are 1840's being being made in China now too, wonder if the Chinese parts will get into the parts supply?
 

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I'm not sure what the Chinese are using for bearings in their balers, but I know that while they were still being exported to China every 1840 came with a spare set of bearings because the Chinese would go through them like candy.

Granted, they'd also mount a speed-up gearbox on the tongue and operate the balers at 750 rpm too. Color me baffled.
 

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Was that a speed up box for sure? 750 pto rpm is common on Asian tractors so I'd expect a step down box on those models to run the 1840?. I saw a video of the Chinese baling corn stalks and another of what looked like bio fuel / mulcher chopped brush being baled up. Rough and dirty stuff.

I'm not sure what the Chinese are using for bearings in their balers, but I know that while they were still being exported to China every 1840 came with a spare set of bearings because the Chinese would go through them like candy.

Granted, they'd also mount a speed-up gearbox on the tongue and operate the balers at 750 rpm too. Color me baffled.
 

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Was that a speed up box for sure? 750 pto rpm is common on Asian tractors so I'd expect a step down box on those models to run the 1840?. I saw a video of the Chinese baling corn stalks and another of what looked like bio fuel / mulcher chopped brush being baled up. Rough and dirty stuff.
I know I have seen a photo of a gearbox attached to the tongue, but I think you're right that some of their tractors also natively run that speed. You could be right, that one might actually have been a step-down. I think that gearbox was a rarity though, most are just connected right to the tractor.
 

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That's a nice looking baler. It ought to deliver the mail!

I'd be surprised if all of the balers produced today don't use some chinese component, i.e. bearings, etc to some extent. It's a global economy now days.

You're getting rid of the JD 336 and I gather keeping the JD 348.

Do you typically run 2 balers in the field? Is this what drove you to the 1840, a higher capacity baler than the 336 or is the goal to pair down to the 1840?

What kind of hay are you producing? How are you getting up your bales? For some reason I was thinking kickers and wagons?

That should be an interesting comparison as JD and Hesston/MF inline balers are such different designs. I'm looking forward to a progress report come June!

Good luck,

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Yes I'm just hoping they aren't gonna displace American manufacturing with the Chinese components, I'm sure it's tempting to just ship some container loads of parts over.

We used to run both balers in the same field but I haven't had an extra driver to rake for me the last two years. Also short drivers as we had 3 trucks delivering baskets to customers while the balers ran. I'm looking for a Vermeer r23 or similar that I can add the rake and bale setup to as we bale right behind the rake already.

If the 1840 performs well, and a rake falls in my lap, I'll add acid and run just the one baler so I can get the bales per day I need.

The 348 will probably stay as I have no neighbours to borrow a baler from if mine goes down. I have a round baler but the bales are worthless to sell here.

We grow all grass hay, all mainly timothy. We use hay baskets at the moment but I'm trying to figure out other options. I can stage my six baskets and work alone but then I'm done at 600 bales. I will then dump groups of 250 bales to load onto our flat racks to make it until I have help to deliver hay and bring me back empty baskets.

That's a nice looking baler. It ought to deliver the mail!

I'd be surprised if all of the balers produced today don't use some chinese component, i.e. bearings, etc to some extent. It's a global economy now days.

You're getting rid of the JD 336 and I gather keeping the JD 348.

Do you typically run 2 balers in the field? Is this what drove you to the 1840, a higher capacity baler than the 336 or is the goal to pair down to the 1840?

What kind of hay are you producing? How are you getting up your bales? For some reason I was thinking kickers and wagons?

That should be an interesting comparison as JD and Hesston/MF inline balers are such different designs. I'm looking forward to a progress report come June!

Good luck,
Bill
 

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We used to run both balers in the same field but I haven't had an extra driver to rake for me the last two years. Also short drivers as we had 3 trucks delivering baskets to customers while the balers ran. I'm looking for a Vermeer r23 or similar that I can add the rake and bale setup to as we bale right behind the rake already.
Get an R2300 if you can swing it. If you have many small parcels to rake the time savings folding and unfolding will about pay for the price difference.
 
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Just for interest as well, the old CIH models had the bolt on axle stubs, so at some point in the MF's they were deleted and now brought back. Smells like a bean counter mucking around with things to me.

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Tread
 

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Just for interest as well, the old CIH models had the bolt on axle stubs, so at some point in the MF's they were deleted and now brought back. Smells like a bean counter mucking around with things to me.

491646269.jpg
What model of Case is that? I think it's a Hesston 4655, not a 4590/1840. The 4590 has a bent axle frame; not a straight member.
 

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Huh, it's a 4570. I checked the parts book and, sure enough, even the 1837 (and 1835) has bolt-on spindles.

Seems a bit bizarre that the two cheapest balers they sold would have bolt-ons, but the 4590 would be welded.
 

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So we finally got it up and running, put a few hundred bales through. It doesn’t like wads but it hasn’t broken the stuffer bolt, always the main flywheel shear bolt. I’m thinking the knife clearances are too large. Last person to go through it set the needle stick through to wire tie specs so I got that all sorted out. Replaced broken twine guide. Got a sillage chopper style quick hitch put on the back which has been nice for changing baskets.
 
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