Hay & Forage Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just noticed that there is a pressure gauge option for the JD hydraulic bale tension system (see Part #5 in the image below). This looked to be an intriguing addition to my baler, until I noticed it was a $165 part...

With that in mind, here is my question. Does anyone have this gauge on their baler, and could tell me the pressure range of the gauge? I checked with my dealer, but they were not able to get this detail from the parts description. Obviously, there are cheaper sources for hydraulic pressure gauges, but I want to be sure I get one with the appropriate range.

Rectangle Font Parallel Circle Screenshot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I attempted to put a non-Deere gauge on my baler but I ended up not having the right fittings and didn't want to make a few more trips to the store. I was going to come back to this after baling season. My system has worked well after I installed it. Once dialed in, I haven't messed with the setting. I wanted to make note of the various settings in varying hay conditions for my son to make it easy to return to the correct settings in the future. I did notice that in order to take your readings you want the RPMs to be at what you normally bale. I use 2200. Seems the tension changes as the RPMs changes since it is a chain driven pump. Report back if you get something installed. I will too. Go Boilers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Been baling hay since the 1970's never saw a baler out here in California without hydraulic chamber pressure. With how dry it always is and baling with the dew you change the pressure many times during the few hours a day that are fit to bale. Start at just showing your off 0 to 700 or 800 is time to stop generally. But cannot tell you how much more the range on a gauge is. The more moisture the better the hay packs so we keep adding pressure to make solid bale for machine pickup. Soft mushy bales are way more trouble than extra heavy ones. But since the hay market is more and more by the bale than by the ton, nobody want them to heavy. Just part how it is different in the dry west.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top