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I'm talking about relative to the life cycle of the plant, weather, etc. This is probably a laughable question, but this is my first year haying and managing my fields so I'll step up and ask what is probably a silly question. And do I have to contract this out to someone who's licensed to apply fertilizer (Maryland) or can I apply it myself? FWIW, I'm growing orchard grass on about 35 acres and I'm wondering if there's something I can do in November to benefit my fields for next year. Freeze warning tonight!

Thanks everyone.
 

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I would have no problem with liming this time of year if it's not too soft (it is, here) but would wait to fertilize in the spring, at least for nitrogen, otherwise you're just wasting it. P and K take longer to work down to the root and do promote root health, so I wouldn't feel bad about getting them on in the fall, but fertilization is typically done NPK in bulk at the same time and most often in the spring. Soil nutrients have higher bioavailability to the root when the soil is at the correct pH, so it's more beneficial to get your pH correction rolling first, and then fertilize later. It will take several years to get soil pH corrected with a single application of lime (needs time to work down into the soil), and nitrogen application acidifies the soil so will always be counteracting your lime to some extent.

If prices are going to be nutso in the spring, I may find a spot to do P and K this fall yet.
 

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I think October and November are the best months to spread lime. Easier to find a day or so the is not muddy, ground isn’t frozen, and not blowing a gale.

Va Tech has recommended fall application for p and k for years. I did mine this fall due to price and availability concerns projected for next spring. i don’t spread n in fall on hay per Hayjosh’s comment
 

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Hay Master
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Ls,
Regarding your situation, you don't need a license to apply lime or fertilizer. You can borrow a fertilizer buggy from the fertilizer dealer and spread the fertilizer yourself, but spreading limestone at the much higher volume usually requires someone to spread it who has the proper equipment. Another point is that it is difficult to maintain the proper distance from the previous pass so that you don't overlap or not properly overlap to get good coverage. Also, dealerships who spread lime and fertilizer charge a spread fee per acre covered, so even though it may be okay to spread phosphorus and potassium in fall, it is more economical to spread the P and K with the spring nitrogen application and not pay two spreading fees.
You didn't mention that you had a soil test done on the field soil. This is important to do before considering when to spread lime and fertilizer.
 

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I'm talking about relative to the life cycle of the plant, weather, etc. This is probably a laughable question, but this is my first year haying and managing my fields so I'll step up and ask what is probably a silly question. And do I have to contract this out to someone who's licensed to apply fertilizer (Maryland) or can I apply it myself? FWIW, I'm growing orchard grass on about 35 acres and I'm wondering if there's something I can do in November to benefit my fields for next year. Freeze warning tonight!

Thanks everyone.
For MD you do need a nutrient applicators license along along with a nutrient plan and current soil tests. If using commercial fertilizer you also need to file an annual implementation report (AIR) of the nutrients applied.
 
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