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Duck eggs sure are good for breakfast...

Even the green ones...

Put a little dill weed in them-- VERY tasty!

Welcome and good luck! OL JR :)

PS. Agree ducks are nasty hygiene-wise, and IMHO are too greasy to eat for meat, but the eggs are very tasty...
 

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Welcome to the forum Jan, I guess grits is a acquired taste or I've never had them done right lol and I was in Ft. McClellan Al. for 14 weeks never got to liking grits, maybe its cause I am a yank lmao
Meh... I don't like grits neither...

Jerry Clower, country comedian extraordinaire, used to have a bit where he decried the loss of grits on the breakfast menus of restaurants back in the 80's, I guess... (they're back in vogue now though).

Said the waitress said, "sorry, we don't have grits, but you can have hashbrowns"...

He told her, "Ma'am, I've been poor in my life... I mean POOR... Poor like I didn't have a proper pair of shoes of my own til I was eight years old kind of "poor". "Poor" like eating mustard greens and collard greens at the same meal because there wasn't nothin' else... I mean "poor" like Momma eatin' the chicken neck so us growin' boys could have them there good pieces... BUT, in all my years, and poor as we was, I ain't NEVER been SO poor that I had to eat an Irish 'tater for breakfast!"

LOL:)

Personally, I ain't never been so poor I had to eat ground up corn meal for breakfast... LOL:)

Though, it ain't that bad, so long as you have some good South Carolina fatback with it...

Later! OL JR :)
 

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It also keeps the place from growing up more. Amazing how quickly Mother Nature can reclaim a place.
Yep... looking at old photos and little switches coming up in the fences were full fledged trees now. We had the old fencelines bulldozed on the Needville place and chainsawed down trees straddling underground phone lines and stuff and let the stumps rot down, back when we were still row-cropping. Since we've re-fenced the place and gone all hay and cows, we ride the fences and pastures and spray Remedy/diesel mix to wipe out switches as they come up.

Same thing at Shiner, in places switches grew into trees and trees into thickets with greenbriar and crap that the cattle couldn't hardly even get through. Then the fences go to pot in there and you can't even fix them. Lots of old cross-fences that had gone totally to pot and needed to go, so we started spraying Remedy/diesel mix and wiping it out. Started with the perimeter fences (which were in pretty good shape as they'd been replaced over the past decade or so) taking out various trash trees that were growing up in them, most about 6-12 feet tall and usually no larger than 4-6 inches. Cleaned up a lot of mesquite and huisache and toothache trees (camphor trees) and hackberries and similar crap from the pastures and started doing the cross-fences. We rolled up as much crossfence as we could and pulled lines of old posts, but the heavily wooded/thicket areas we just hosed with Remedy/diesel mix. Needless to say it was a step-by-step process, that we did over the past five years. Spray, let the chemical kill the trees the first year, let the tree dry out and "loosen up" the roots the following year, push them out with the 5610S and FEL during the winter/spring when the ground was wet and soft, push into burn piles. We finally pushed and burned the last of it last spring-- we pushed the old fences out with it in the really brushy areas and burned it wire and all, then I'd come along with the FEL and roll the barbwire under the bucket to make a big "turd" of barb wire all balled up on itself and load that on the trailer-- hauled a load this past spring that was 5,500 lbs of barb wire and various old cow troughs and junk... Nothing nicer than turning a mess into money!

Now we can do one pass with the golf cart with my brother driving and me running the spray gun with Remedy/diesel in the late spring and wipe out everything that comes up with just a couple gallons of chemical at the most... but it's a continuous effort... if you think you'll just clean up brush and walk away forever, you're sadly mistaken!

I just shake my head at some guys around the area that spend boku big bucks bulldozing and root plowing mesquite and huisache and other nuisance trees and brush, disk it and spin some grass seed out, and think they're done forever... and in a dozen years it's grown up into a thicket of 10-12 foot tall brush and trees again... When all they had to do to keep it clean and brush/tree free was ride around on a golf cart or four wheeler with a TSC electric sprayer on the back with a couple gallons of Remedy in it and about 8 gallons of diesel fuel as carrier, and spray the bottom foot of the brush all the way around-- which for small switches 2-3 feet tall, is usually just a quick "spritz" with the gun on stream mode on both sides of the trunk... Couldn't be easier... Wait til they're a foot in diameter, it takes a gallon of mix to coat the entire trunk all the way around a foot or two up from the ground, but it WILL kill it... might take a year though.

And we did it all with a 70 horse Ford tractor and a golf cart...

Later! OL J R :)
 

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Good morning to all. I grew up on small (very small) animal farm and wife on tobacco farm, many years ago! Mules were still used to some degree on both farms. Do enjoy farming greatly and do farm what is her family farm for the joy and to take care of it. Have worked to get it up to about 38 acres in cultivation and rest of the land here and on what is left of my families is in timber.

For now near twenty years planted row crops some peanuts (for those who are blessed to like boiled peanuts and to know the cry in the tobacco warehouses of years ago) but really corn and soybeans. I have been looking at moving from row crop to hay for about twenty years with no background (unless you county loading with pitch fork onto mule pulled wagon) did not find the support needed. Blessed to have a very good friend who now with a few years experience and the necessary equipment to do all the cutting and baling have taken my first major step and had fifteen acres sprigged with Coastal Bermuda this March. Boy and I thought i was ready!

Finding weed problems did not know we had due to use of roundup ready crops, especially Johnson Grass. My concerns at present are first controlling the Johnson Grass in three month old Coastal. Then storage for the hay. After that will be hay equipment. My first hay equipment I think I need is a system to know where has been sprayed (no rows to count) and system to load the square bales.

Have read a good bit here and really do like Hay Talk. Have read many comments on Johnson Grass and also Guidance systems. Not firm on either of those two issues yet or hay grapple for square bales.

Pray you have a safe and blessed season.

Kenneth

PS: insurance is my full time business mainly in life, health but a few years experience in property insurance. Not in any mode other than recommendation glad to help with any question.
Best thing to control johnsongrass in bermuda-- three words-- SPIEDEL WEED WIPER. Google it and get you one, use 33% Roundup solution in it run a foot above your bermuda. Works great on a front end loader. OL J R :)
 
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