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Now that is a good idea.
So back before I had a tracked skidsteer and my feeding area was nothing but a big mud hole I used to feed with a wheeled skidsteer at a round bale feeder. What a mess. Big ruts,getting stuck halfway to the feeder with a bale on the front. Huge mess. Then one night I am going to feed in the dark and the starter goes out on the skidsteer. So here I am, its dark, cold and muddy. I got cows fussing cause they are hungry and a broke down skidsteer. That's when I realized I have a 6k lb mini ex sitting in the barn. I use the hoe to roll the bale onto the top of the backfill blade. I then lift the backfill blade to lift one end of the bale up while pinching and lifting the other end with the hoe. I can then track up to the feeder. Once there I can use the thumb to pinch the bale and lift it up into the feeder. Works pretty slick in a pinch.

What I would really love to do is find one of those cranes like off an old truss delivery truck. That would work real slick for moving and setting bales in a feeder.
 

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I'm siderailing this a bit... @PaMike, this is why I'm getting ready to build fenceline hay feeders. No more muck and mire. The panels will be portable as well. Unhook them to use elsewhere when needed.
 

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I'm siderailing this a bit... @PaMike, this is why I'm getting ready to build fenceline hay feeders. No more muck and mire. The panels will be portable as well. Unhook them to use elsewhere when needed.
Yup, I kind of did the same thing. I build a "peninsula" out into the field with a feeder at the end. I can then store bales in the fenced out peninsula and never get my skidsteer/tractor/mini actually in the manure. I've been doing it this way for probably 5 years now. Wish I would have done it this way 15 years ago..
 

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We had a contractor here on and off the past couple years, removed hundreds of trees some very large and also leveled off a large area for a riding arena on a side hill all with a JD excavator. With the trees they always pushed them over first before cutting them to get the stump out. He also stacked a lot of boulders with it and the thing is that excavator didn't even have a thumb. I have pushed out a lot of trees with JD450 loader and CAT D6 dozer but I would have to vote for an excavator. Wish I had one. I mean the dozer and loader work good as long as the trees aren't that big. Also liked the way the excavator was able to strip away all the branches.
 

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As someone who's been around a lot of heavy equipment I would suggest a stump grinder (hire someone with a good size one on tracks not a skid steer), next choice excavator (hire someone with experience even though they're not that hard, you'll save not trying to learn on a big machine), and I agree with the others a push blade is much better, you'll rue the day with a 6 way blade (and again, if you know nothing, your better off with someone who has experience and is good based on the costs of learning). Youtube can even be your friend in learning to operate heavy equipment if you choose to do the work on your own, Komatsu actually has some good videos for learning novices.
 

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There are many things that you can do with an excavator! My dream is to own one, but they are very expensive. Some models cost as much as a house. Until then, I am going to rent them from companies like mayxaydungmh.com or ask some of my friends who have them in order to make sure that everything is okay. A good piece of machinery is needed on every farm and I cannot even imagine my life without them at the moment. Everything gets done faster and everyone is satisfied. At least, this is my opinion
 

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Over the years I’ve bought a D6H LGP dozer and a Cat 320C excavator to clear land here on the farm. An excavator with a thumb (I have a mechanical/stiff arm) Is best for cleaning up trees. Trees can be grubbed up and piled or windrowed to the side as you move along. Much more versatile. A dozer works but it takes longer and you end up with a lot more dirt removed and in your burn pile. Big stumps you will work all around it getting dug up and end up with a big hole. On smaller trees, a dozer tends to just shear em off at ground level. With an excavator and thumb you can pull those small ones out, give it a couple shakes and swing it onto a pile in just about one motion. I’m also of the opinion that a 6 way blade dozer is not a good idea for grubbing trees. A tractor with a C frame and hydraulic tilt is best. When you put that blades end bit into a tree and push you wanna be pushing on something solid. The C frame and trunnion mounted on the side of a tractor. With a 6 way blade your pushing against a hydraulic cylinder. Have to watch you p’s and q’s then.
 

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Go someplace dry like most of Wyoming, Idaho, eastern Washington and Oregon where they get like 6 inches of yearly rainfall and they can stack round bales like that with no concern of moisture related loses.
 
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