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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

Last year i bought a completely rebuilt New Holland Super Hayliner 69. The baler works fairly good and almost never misses a bale. What are some good tips for keeping this machine up in shape? I plan on running quite a bit of hay through this machine next year around 10000 bales. I bale mostly grass mix and alfalfa I really need this machine to run flawless. I know it is not a high capacity machine but it should do what i need it to do! My main problem is i cant seem to get a tight enough bale and they want to "horseshoe". What can I do to stop this? It also makes a fairly "hairy" bale. The knife is brand new and sharp. any advice would be great!!!

Thanks in advance!!!
 

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Hi everyone!

Last year i bought a completely rebuilt New Holland Super Hayliner 69. The baler works fairly good and almost never misses a bale. What are some good tips for keeping this machine up in shape? I plan on running quite a bit of hay through this machine next year around 10000 bales. I bale mostly grass mix and alfalfa I really need this machine to run flawless. I know it is not a high capacity machine but it should do what i need it to do! My main problem is i cant seem to get a tight enough bale and they want to "horseshoe". What can I do to stop this? It also makes a fairly "hairy" bale. The knife is brand new and sharp. any advice would be great!!!

Thanks in advance!!!
your knives aren't close enough instead of cutting the grass it's pulling it through
 

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Depends where the bale is hairy if the problem is the knife set or not.

To get a nice composed bale, it requires nice composed windrows.

For a time I had an International 175 (IH) windrower/ mower/ conditioner.

They were made in the "60s, the 1960's that is (I may be old but not that) with a draper front and a finger tine wheel to lay the cut crop onto the draper belts which brought the hay into the centre and out through a pair of conditioning rollers.

The windrows had every stalk laying in the same direction, side by side.

When baled with a NH 317 baler the stalks were not entangled with each other and they sprang out from the bale, a really bad hairdo look. The 317 has a feeder transfer system not unlike the Super 69. That sytle of feeder does not mix the hay much from windrow to bale. A NH 575 on the other hand with the rotors and packer fork does mix the hay up more from windrow to bale.

My point is the hay material should have a reasonable amount of entanglement to prevent a hairy bale.

Cutting long material like a cereal oat crop with minimal conditioning or raking could give a hairy bale out of a Super 69. ie not much entangling of the long material.

Getting a firm density bale has two sets of adjustments and one other possible cause..

First adjustment, the Super 69 had hydraulic tensioning available, check that is working. A blown O ring in the control valve will result in soft bales. A pressure guage on the pressure line can be useful to see if it is working and to assess relative pressures/densities.

I guess the baler you have may have had the hydraulic system removed or not supplied so it could be used with a thrower. Throwers are a mystery to me.

Any way if no hydraulics there will be a screw tension adjustment to vary bale density. Incidentally even hydraulic tension systems have a screw adjustment in addition to the control valve.

Second adjustment, there should be wedges in place in the side of the bale chute and these can be varied in number and placement to alter density and shape to a degree. More wedges gives a slight increase in bale density.

Now to the other possible cause. Frozen hay dogs or broke hay dog springs.

There are pictures on the topic referred to below showing the bale wedges in the chute of a super 69 and showing the bottom hay dog and as a bonus showing the hay dog springs.

I have made an extensive post yesterday on "re New holland super 69 hay baler" topic about the remedies for banana bales. I presume the horseshoe shape you refer to is a bent shape when the bale is viewed from above as it first comes out of the baler. ie no quarter turn in place.

If the bend in the bale is up and down when viewed from the side as it comes out of the chute please give a post so the cause can be identified.

Pictures would be great and there are instructions on the same topic referred to.

I would be a bit wary of a "completely rebuilt " baler of the age of a Super 69 for a 10,000 pa task.

You need to check the bale chamber floor in particular, that is very difficult to rebuild and wear of years of baling and maybe a few years of rust and neglect could result in very little metal left in the floor. No floor, the baler is useless.

If the other mjor components needed a complete rebuild then then to me the unrebuildable bit would be very suspect.

Good luck with the 10,000 pa task as that would in practical terms represent close on 50 hours continuous baling without major breakdowns. Not impossible as the Super 69's would have fronted up to that in their day.
 

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Your reply about hand pickup was posted while I was toiling with my hunt and pick keyboard technique. I would be questioning how long you can go on with that sort of arrangement, unskilled, untrained junior workers are a recipe for injury and from my understanding of the USA, everyone has an itchy litigation finger. Insure well and check the insurance company is aware of the risk involved. Insurance companies will soon hide behind the doctrine of "uberrimae fidea" or "uberrima fides".

An insurance company loophole to avoid payout.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The top and bottom tensioners are fairly worn but not to the point of wearing through. Im sure the haydogs are good as I inspect them every time i use the baler. Other than those thin tensioners the baler is like new
 

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The top and bottom rails that apply pressure to increase density are not what would be the most concerning issue to me.
THe floor of the chamber and the start of the chute. This area wears out and could possibly be the same wear status as the tension rails. This area is also liable to suffer rust damage particularly if wet bales remain in the chamber/chute at seasons end.

Look at the chamber floor where the hay dog comes through, but be careful to assess floor thickness because there is often reinforcement around openings.

One of the usually unwritten terms of insurance is contained in the doctrine of uberrimae fidea which means you have to declare ANY factor in your knowledge that COULD increase the risk to the insurance company. Although unwritten it is the foundation of insurance and overrides the written terms of your policy.

If there is an increased risk for whch the company could apply a higher premium or choose to not insure the company can avoid the policy.

I am not saying it will happen, but homework never went astray. Except of course when the dog ate my homework. I still do not understand, the teacher did not believe me. I thought the excuse was original. :rolleyes:
 

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Ya pickin by hand is not worth it on that many bales. I got impatient when I was young and dumb and dropped 1400 on the ground to pick by hand and there is a reason that didnt happen again. If you are close to home get an automatic stooker then you can set them on a trailer and haul them home. Or get an accumulator. As for the baler sell it and upgrade. Dad had a nh 68 when I was a kid for one year. If he could have got his hands on dynamite it would have got it.
 
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