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My soil testing report is supposed to be emailed to me today! I have 30 acres of coastal Bermuda, where I baled last week and aerated the fields as well. There is a BIG rain event starting on Sunday and lasting until Wednesday of next week. I am highly motivated to fertilize today or tomorrow!

My dilemma! In the event I do not get the soil email report I have the premixed choices below...

Helena Chemical has given me these two choices of blends

1) 30-10-10 -1 Sulfur

2) 21-7-14 -9 Sulfur

***Both at a recommended rate of 250 pounds per acre

***Price difference is $132.00

Very simple questions;

1) Which would you go with given it's a Coastal Bermuda Hay Field near Wallis Texas?

2) How many pounds per acre?

3) What's with the Sulfur difference?

4) Be patient, miss the rain event and wait for the soil analysis?

Thanks and Be Safe!

Mark
 

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I agree with Colby, I'm in Schulenburg and am holding off until after the rain. That stuff is too expensive to end up in the pond. I've been doing 150 lbs. per acre of 30-10-10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, all my area is super flat and aerated all of them... I'm believing my combo will end up deep in the soil...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Question, my entire property is about a 5.4 to 5.8 acidic. Recommendation is 1 to 1.4 per acre...

The rep said best to do in January. Opinions? Wait or do it after my next cut which will be mid May?
 

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Well, all my area is super flat and aerated all of them... I'm believing my combo will end up deep in the soil...
Which is good for phosphorus because it doesn't move through the soil with water (leaching). Nitrogen is water soluable and WILL move where the water does. We get a flood, most of your N goes down the creek. ALSO, nitrogen tends to go away in waterlogged soils. It's prone to denitrification. Of course some formulations of nitrogen are better than others (urea is particularly prone to such problems as I recall).

When it's calling for 95 lbs, that's 95 lbs ACTUAL N per acre-- not 95 lbs of fertilizer. That means you multiply your fertilizer analysis number like a percentage by the pounds of actual N needed. Say a 12-24-12 fertilizer would have 12 lbs of ACTUAL N, 24 lbs ACTUAL P, and 12 lbs of ACTUAL K per 100 lbs. Course a lot of fertilizer is blended to more closely approximate the proportions you need. Quick example-- if you're applying 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer, that's 32 lbs actual N per 100 lbs. So for 95 lbs ACTUAL N per acre, you's have to apply 300 lbs per acre, since 300 x .32(%)= 96 lbs ACTUAL N per acre.

It doesn't take much rain to carry N down into the soil. If you've aerated your pasture (what did you use?? Shank style ripper renovator or a rolling type like an Aer-Way or what?-- just curious) it should help but I STILL don't think I'd risk putting out all that expensive fertilizer and risk have it going to pot if we get a big flood.

Hope this helps! OL J R :)
 

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Question, my entire property is about a 5.4 to 5.8 acidic. Recommendation is 1 to 1.4 per acre...

The rep said best to do in January. Opinions? Wait or do it after my next cut which will be mid May?
You could put a ton out fairly easily. Thing is, lime takes time to work. The finer the particle size, the faster it'll work, but the more expensive it is. You could probably spin out some fine prilled lime if you want to see any results this year, but it'll be expensive. If you go with other forms of lime, it'll probably be next year before you really see a lot of benefit.

Later! OL J R :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You could put a ton out fairly easily. Thing is, lime takes time to work. The finer the particle size, the faster it'll work, but the more expensive it is. You could probably spin out some fine prilled lime if you want to see any results this year, but it'll be expensive. If you go with other forms of lime, it'll probably be next year before you really see a lot of benefit.

Later! OL J R :)
Thanks! Great info! The aerator is an aerway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Which is good for phosphorus because it doesn't move through the soil with water (leaching). Nitrogen is water soluable and WILL move where the water does. We get a flood, most of your N goes down the creek. ALSO, nitrogen tends to go away in waterlogged soils. It's prone to denitrification. Of course some formulations of nitrogen are better than others (urea is particularly prone to such problems as I recall).

When it's calling for 95 lbs, that's 95 lbs ACTUAL N per acre-- not 95 lbs of fertilizer. That means you multiply your fertilizer analysis number like a percentage by the pounds of actual N needed. Say a 12-24-12 fertilizer would have 12 lbs of ACTUAL N, 24 lbs ACTUAL P, and 12 lbs of ACTUAL K per 100 lbs. Course a lot of fertilizer is blended to more closely approximate the proportions you need. Quick example-- if you're applying 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer, that's 32 lbs actual N per 100 lbs. So for 95 lbs ACTUAL N per acre, you's have to apply 300 lbs per acre, since 300 x .32(%)= 96 lbs ACTUAL N per acre.

It doesn't take much rain to carry N down into the soil. If you've aerated your pasture (what did you use?? Shank style ripper renovator or a rolling type like an Aer-Way or what?-- just curious) it should help but I STILL don't think I'd risk putting out all that expensive fertilizer and risk have it going to pot if we get a big flood.

Hope this helps! OL J R :)
Thanks JR, I understand it now!

I did put it out... A 27-27-0-1

The chemicals were Ammonium Sulfate, Diammonium Phosphate, and Urea... Put out 7,540 pounds over 30 acres or 250 pounds per acre, 3.77 tons x $433.36 = $1,633.77

Well, lesson learned if a washout... Knowing my property it would have to rain 5 or 6 plus inches in one period of time to see water running or flooding my hay fields... I'm hoping for 2 inches and then a break of a day and then believe I would be good...

Thanks,

Mark
 

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Where would I be able to get that lime? Helena orders Limestone and then another company puts it out...? Seems like too many middle men...

Thanks,

Mark
As for "quick lime" or "pelletized lime". That is what it is called here for lime that will raise PH quickly (and therefore will leave quickly) 100 lbs per acre would probably tide you over until the regular lime has time to work.

73, Mark
 
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Texas Crushed Stone Co. in Georgetown is your best source for the fine limestone (ECCE 100%). Limestone can be applied anytime you can get someone to haul and spread it. The sooner you get it applied, the sooner the pH will be corrected. With the pH test results that your samples showed, one ton per acre on all fields would be sufficient this year.

Once again, soil pH does not go down faster when corrected by using fine limestone. The opposite is true because finer limestone raises soil pH faster and to a higher level than does the same amount of a coarser limestone. Since the finer limestone raises pH to a higher level, it takes linger for that higher pH to come back down.

The larger particles in coarse limestone are really not effective in changing soil pH. If you purchase an ECCE 100% limestone for correcting soil pH, all that limestone will be reactive. If you purchase a corarser ECCE 64% limestone, 36% of that limestone will essentially be ineffective for increasing soil pH. That means that for every ton of limestone you have hauled to your farm, you could consider that 720 lb of each ton will be ineffective for neutralizing soil acidity. For each ton hauled, you might consider it has a 720 lb rock in it that you could just as well drop off at the field gate and use for a better purpose than applying to your soil to increase pH.

One more point, finer limestone purchased from most quarries is possibly $2 to $4 per ton more expensive than the coarser limestone. If you are told otherwise by your limestone dealer, he isn't being truthful. The difference in price may be due to the finer limestone having to be transported by covered truck, whereas, the coarser limestone can be transported by rail and dumped at a dealership for a cheaper rate. There are cost trade offs in the freight costs.
 

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According to Luke S:

When it's calling for 95 lbs, that's 95 lbs ACTUAL N per acre-- not 95 lbs of fertilizer. That means you multiply your fertilizer analysis number like a percentage by the pounds of actual N needed. Say a 12-24-12 fertilizer would have 12 lbs of ACTUAL N, 24 lbs ACTUAL P, and 12 lbs of ACTUAL K per 100 lbs.

This is mostly correct except that in each blend of fertilizer the 2nd number is not actual P, but is represented as P2O5,, and the the third number in the blend is not actual K, but is repersented as K2O. Don't ask me why this is so, but it is the way the fertilizer industry wants to represent P and K in a fertilizer blend. Perhaps the industry wants to show a higher percentage of nutrient in the blend by using P2O5 and K2O.
 

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One more point regarding fertilizing Coastal bermudagrass. This grass uses nearly as much potassium as it does nitrogen. Shorting Coastal bermudagrass on its need for potassium will lead to stand thinning and eventual loss of stand.
 

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One more point regarding fertilizing Coastal bermudagrass. This grass uses nearly as much potassium as it does nitrogen. Shorting Coastal bermudagrass on its need for potassium will lead to stand thinning and eventual loss of stand.
This is preached to us here by our regional extension agent.

Our rule of thumb is that for each ton of bermuda removed we need to add 30 lb. of potassium.

Does that sound right? I know locations may vary.
 
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