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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going to see how good my fences are. The articles I have read through make no mention of a recommended time frame to reintegrate the animals back together and not have the calves go back to nursing. Was curious if anybody has done this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
12 hours of bellowing and all is well. today will be 48 hrs. Calves spent last night outside while the rest of their group was bedded inside. other than that calves could care less. There are only 2 calves this year. Have not decided how long to keep them separate but thinking at least 4 weeks before putting them back together.
 

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Put the herd back together Saturday and everybody is good, no attempt to go back to nursing. Ended up with only doing one, week after putting them out I brought the black one(not the one in picture)in to milk and left the dun one on pasture with the steer. Brought the other heifers in early as I felt bad forcing them to slop around in the mud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This years attempt was a failure. Had 5 calves separated for 5 weeks within 15 min one went right back to nursing. Mom did not like it and was hoping that would end it. No, within an hour 3 of the 5 were back at it. Not setup to redo the process this time of the year, going to put the rings in now.

Which ones have you had the best luck with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If a calf is determined enough and mom don't mind they will nurse with a ring or flap in without too much issue.

I weaned calves off in late October and the few retained heifers I kept back from the sale barn will stay separated until breeding time next July. Even then have to keep an eye on them to make sure they dont steal milk.
That is what my research found as well. I'm hoping they don't. I have some ordered and time will tell. Not sure why this year is different. The only thing I did different was this year I kept only the calves together and last year everybody but the cows. Not sure if that would make a difference. Will find out next year.

We're somewhat limited on space and where I have running water so really hoping to keep together but, yes I may have to separate if rings don't work. This will be the first year of not having to carry water, looking forward to that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thought I would add onto this thread. Borrowed the water tank for a different project so decided to send the cows to the furthest pasture and keep the calves at the barn. Let me tell you, I much prefer the fence line weaning even if we do have to listen to them. The main perimeter fence (4 wire barb) is keeping them in but the temporary fence is no match (single strand electrified twine). Been over a week and they are still pissed. There are 5 cows and have gotten themselves into 2-3 different groups.

I believe fence line weaning is considerably less stressful based on what I saw. Calves seemed stressed and cows most definitely stressed pacing the fences for days.

Our fence line weaning consists of just 2 strands of electrified tape or twine splitting the barnyard in 2. Each group can go to pasture as they want. Zero issue with anybody going through it.

Next year we will be fence line weaning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
So far so good, my cows are still laying where they can be close to their calves and everyone is respecting the electric fence.

How long will I need to keep them separated so they won't nurse again ?
As long as possible. Had one that never quit. Longer than a month if you can do it
 

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Any weaning issues I have mentioned has been narrowed down to a Jersey issue with the calves unable to break the bond. Even after 6 months. The one jersey I milked, her calf had no contact with her or nursed on any other cow he was with from October to May. When I put the herd back together briefly I caught her calf nursing. It's interesting and I'm sure the why will never be figured out.

The weaning process works otherwise.
 
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