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I have sheep and have never had good luck with electronetting. I had about 1000 feet given to me and I loved it so much, I gave it to someone else who was up against it. In that regard it is better than nothing, but not by much.

In my opinion, the most expensive fencing is the cheapest. I know Page Wire is not cheap, but you put it up once and it stays up...for 30 years. That is cheap fence. Fence you have to constantly move, constantly keep void of weeds and brush, chase sheep back into, and have the liability of animals on the loose...it is a huge time-suck. I am a full-time farmer so time is not so much of an issue, but for the small farmer who has a job in town...it is another matter altogether. How will your boss like it if you have to go home to constantly put animals in your cheap fence?

And never forget that a fence's job with small livestock, is to not only to keep them in, but other animals out. I have invested heavily in fence, but it has been well worth it. Honestly, Page Wire fence 4 feet tall, with strong corners and pressure treated posts is really cheap when deducted over a 30 year life-span.
 

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A Custom Hire job from hades!

It was only 18 acres of turning forest into field, but it was on top of a mountainside with most of it being exposed bedrock. Some hummocks of soil allowed all but 5 acres to be covered over, but was it ever rocky and a long push for the bulldozer. I ended up throwing the track once on the big excavator, twice on a smaller one, and the big bulldozer (a 700 John Deere) literally broke in half... twice! Once the track broke in half, and the other time the rear sprocket shattered; all from operating on ledge rock; day in, and day out.

The job also included building a rifle range, two roads that totaled a half mile in length, 5 culverts installed, a pad for a 80 x 100 haybarn, demolishing two houses, and digging two ponds.

Next year I have to finish grade it, pull the stumps off the ledge rock that still remain (those 5 acres) and sow it all into grass, but the bulk of it is done. Some 600 hours on equipment and over 50,000 yards of earth moved. Yesterday was the first day I had off in months, and by work days I mean starting before sun-up and finishing after sun down since the equipment had lights enough to work. (I did not work up on the ledge rock though under lights as it was too dangerous).
 

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No, no money to be made.

It was for a Christian Camp for kids, though the place operates year round. The 18 acres of clearing was for their horse program and to expand it. Its a tough thing; it takes more activities to attract more kids so that more kids hear the gospel. But this year was great; 110 children accepted Jesus out of 770. Yes my equipment broke, BUT with 110 kids walking the streets of gold in heaven someday, what is a few breakdowns pushing nasty ole earth down here? It is all about perspective.

I cut the camp a break on price. Basically it was an absolute cut-rate price. The nearest bid was $64,000 and right now I am at $22,500, but I am not done yet. Still the $64,000 would not have included demolishing two houses, building two ponds, building the rifle range, and the roads, so it really is comparing apples to oranges. I figure the total cost will lie around $30,000.

Right now I am at $955.55 per acre where as on flat ground it can be as low as $201.01 per acre.
 

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I am kind of wondering if this machine might be able to reduce the overall cost per acre of land clearing. Its no doubt expensive, but it would eliminate a lot of labor, other expensive equipment, and removing the stump from the ground. Just drive over clearcut land and level it with a dozer or grader. It would not work on that most recent land clearing job, as it was filled with ledge, but most jobs it would be okay.

I average 3 acres per day with a bulldozer, and 2 acres per day with an excavator at 350 stumps per acre (on average).

I would love to hear your thoughts on it...

 
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