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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Fattening up a beef. In the past we have always used cracked corn, but I thought that maybe I would try something different this time, so I was thinking of using distillers grain. What do you guys think of distillers gain vs corn? I have not bought either as of yet, not really sure where I would buy the distillers grain yet. What say you?
 

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Local dairymen have fed distillers grain for yrs where I live. Without researching I think palatability of DS grain would be better than cracked corn.

Last yr I had a yearling slaughtered that was only fed grass that suits my taste-buds better than high $$$$$ meat from grocery store & my home grown meat cost significantly less per #.
 

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Compared to cracked corn, distillers grains are going to have lower starch and higher protein content. If it is dried distillers products, storage won’t be a concern. If it is a modified or wet distillers product, it will have a shelf life, wet deteriorating faster than modified. I have fed many truckloads of both wet and modified; at the moment we are feeding a blend of DDGs (dried) and cracked corn to calves. Distiller products help balance out the protein side of the ration and improve palatability.
 

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Back on the old dairy farm whenever the cows got loose they'd head right for the brewer's grain and wade right in knee deep and pig out. It was a decently priced, high protein way to get them to eat more TMR feed for higher milk production.
 

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An ounce of doing is worth a pound of talk
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Would they gain faster, or more on the distillers grain?
 

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I don't think of distillers as equivalent to corn but as an alternative to soybean meal. Couple things we have noticed. If you feed to much distillers regardless if it is dried or pelletized, you can cause some damage to the liver. Our butcher would say it was a hot liver meaning showed stress. We normally have our steers on feed about 6-8 months, we always have free choice hay, water, and sodium bi-carb available to them in addition to the steer stuffer. Starter ration is about 3 or 4 pounds to 1 pound corn to gluten but we transition to about 6 to 1 for the last 3 months. I tried feeding it to a few butcher pigs several years ago and the fat was yellow but I have never had that issue with cattle. I accidentally let the bi-carb slip a few years ago and lost two 800 pounders. I put bi-carb in the feed and keep it free choice too.
 
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