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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The burndown (Roundup, dicamba, 2, 4-d on July 21) stunted it but didn't kill it (last photo). It's also in my lawn (first photo), and the photo with sky is to show the seedhead.

What is it and how do I kill it???


Plant Terrestrial plant Grass Grass family Tree
Cloud Sky Plant Natural landscape Tree
Plant Terrestrial plant Grass Agriculture Flowering plant
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, folks, it's been an interesting day. Turns out those are photos of two different weeds. My first clue was when I dug up the roots and they were not the same. The nice green one with the lovely purple seedhead (in the lawn, not sprayed) appears to be greasegrass which has nice, simple roots. I didn't find it in the burndown residue to I guess the herbicide killed whatever greasegrass might have been in the field.

The one that was sprayed but not killed appears to be beaked panic grass (panicum anceps).

The beaked panic grass had roots with rhizomes. It also had a different color seedhead but I put that down to the herbicide changing the color as the plant died.

Now, how to kill it? I'm told it takes a non-specific herbicide like... glyphosate! Been there, done that, it didn't kill it, now what? The local extension agent who helped me identify these two weeds suggested trying paraquat or another round of glyphosate. He said beaked panic grass is not known to be resistant to glyphosate but because of their extensive rhizome network, they can pull additional self-sustaining nutrients from one plant to another.

So at this point, I'm not sure how to proceed. Would a stronger concentration of glyphosate knock it out? Additionally, there is some nice, new dogbane popping up through the residue, the horsenettle was not completely killed first time around, and there are a few milkweed plants (which I thought I'd just dig up).

This is on 30 acres that I'm hoping to seed with orchard grass within a couple weeks. I contracted out the original spraying, but intend to spot spray myself where necessary. What else do I have to do, right? : /

If anyone is dying to see photos of the roots, I'll post those tomorrow.

Thanks, all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I would have thought that rate would’ve killed it. If it were stressed from drought, all bets would be off. Otherwise, I would’ve expected it to work. You are using relatively new glyphosate?
I contracted the spraying out to a large, well-established and respected outfit. I'm confident they use fresh product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
In one picture, it looks like Johnson grass.

Johnson grass is highly invasive and EXTREMELY difficult to kill. It is one of the plants that grows from rhysomes, seeds, and tillers. Disking or plowing causes it to double/triple because it only takes about an inch of the root to start a new plant.

The mistake most people make went spraying Johnson grass is to go too heavy. Too heavy and it kills the top of the plant but leaves many root segments alive and you end up with more plants. One recommendation, which I follow myself, is to use a half rate which gets more of the roots.

Around here, it is spread mostly by the road districts who mow the roadsides after it has gone to seed but not yet dropped. It's a major problem hereabouts.

Johnson grass also produces cyanide when stressed, making it poisonous to livestock.

If I was to design the perfect plant--it would be Johnson grass.

Ralph
I've dealt with small patches of Johnson grass in the past. This is NOT Johnson grass. I am certain about that. I can see Johnson grass in my sleep. The rhizomes of this weed are much smaller, and the leaves are more delicate.
 
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