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· Hay Master (Supposedly)
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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Another thought in the "positive" column:

A 5x6 would be 1000RPM.

My 4x5 is 540 RPM.
5x6 can be either. I've had both and I'd rather have 540. Less vibration if things are getting a little loose and the 540 CV will last about twice as long as the 1000. The 1000 pto is too light on the BR series balers.

5' wide baler means you should have a uniform 5' wide windrow. That can be difficult to accomplish in light crop. Depends a lot on crop conditions and your rake. The other thing related to this is you should have your tractor wheels set for at least 5' between the inside of the sidewalls, 6' is better.
 
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· “Not a real farmer” farmer
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5x6 can be either. I've had both and I'd rather have 540. Less vibration if things are getting a little loose and the 540 CV will last about twice as long as the 1000. The 1000 pto is too light on the BR series balers.

5' wide baler means you should have a uniform 5' wide windrow. That can be difficult to accomplish in light crop. Depends a lot on crop conditions and your rake. The other thing related to this is you should have your tractor wheels set for at least 5' between the inside of the sidewalls, 6' is better.
Wow, thats solid info! Thanks. ]

If making a smaller 5' diameter bale, will having the lighter-duty 1000 PTO be less of a problem than making 6' bales? Or is it more of an issue with simply engaging the PTO and turning that prematurely wears it out?

I guess I'll give back some fuel economy on the weight of the baler and higher PTO HP requirement, too. Thinking that might negate the 1000PTO fuel savings?

Found this: https://www.tractorhouse.com/listings/farm-equipment/for-sale/150469505/2013-new-holland-br7090
 

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Personally I'd want a 540 baler also. Any wear in a 1k shaft shows up as a huge vibration.

As for that baler at Swiderski in Appleton take everything their sales dept says with a grain of salt. Last year they had a BR7070 that was low bale count, perfect condition ready to go yadda yadda yadda. So i made the 4 hour trip to find the baler in question missing parts in the pickup, chain tensioner sprocket replaced with a chunk of oak, welding all over it, etc. Salemans said "it is what it is take it of leave it" and walked away.

After looking over all 4 of the BR7070s they had on the lot ranging from expensive to very expensive I wouldn't have given 100 bucks for anyone of them.
 

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I prefer the 540 also, but there are some considerations for going 1000. The biggest is weight, the 1000 is much easier to handle. Many larger tractors only come in 1000 so that will be a consideration in future tractor purposes. The cons are you can expect the 1000 to wear out faster since it is making two revolutions for each on revolution of a 540. The lightness of the shaft should not be much of a consideration as far as holding up since you can put twice the torque through a 1000 than a 540 of the same size. So theoretically a 1000 only needs to 1/2 as strong as the 540.

Why the 5x5 NH is 1500 lbs lighter is a matter of small differences adding up. The rolls are the same the pickup is the same for a standard 5x6. The 5x5 also has one less tailgate roll, I am thinking without looking. the belts are shorter and the frame is shorter. The standard wheels are smaller on a 5x5. The net system is the same as is the gearbox. The pto drive shaft is smaller though.

After a customer had 3 5x5 balers over the 10 years, I finally convinced him to go with the 560. He was in recently and said he hated to admit it, but I was correct. Baling with a 5x6 baler is much better. His problem was tractor also. It wasn't that he did not have a big enough tractor, but the tractor he wanted to use was smaller. When you are limited in the number of big tractors, you have to make decisions on where to use it. He did get a new ts3.130 or 140 so he uses that on the baler now. That would compare to your Kubota, JD. He does a lot of custom work in the area so he gets on some steep hills, I seen it. FWD is a must in those cases and that size tractor.
 

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Better have a good hitch too. There is a lot of hitch weight on the newer 5x6 JD and Vermeer balers. I don't know about the NH balers.
My current BR7060 weighs in at 5615lbs

BR 7090 weighs in at 6920 (+1,305)

But I don't have a spec on the weight of a BR7090 "specialty crop" model. I would think even heavier.

Bale is going to weigh more, too.

Man I wish they offered brakes. It would be incredibly helpful and safer on steep hills

One of the reasons I thought the 5x5 is ideal is because its a lighter baler.

Pretty sure Deere has a 5x5 silage special baler.
 

· Hay Master (Supposedly)
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Discussion Starter · #111 ·
Time for another update on the 2018 New Holland Specialty Crop 560 balers. Last fall our stalk baling season got cut severely short by the weather and the crop conditions. In the last 12 days we have been able to complete most of the baling work that should have been done last fall. One year ago today, each baler had about 1500 bales on the counter. As of today, each machine has about 7,000 bales on it. For the most part, the balers have been trouble free. A few net wrap hiccups here and there. One baler needed the net roll brake release linkage tweaked, and we also had some trouble with ferrous dust building up on the duckbill home position sensor and causing wrapping errors. We did have a starter roll chain break this week. I sharpened the follower roll scraper and so far we have not had problems with trash hair pinning on the scraper. The declutch delete has worked out well so far.
 
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· Hay Master (Supposedly)
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Discussion Starter · #113 ·
Have you any idea where the ferrous dust was coming from. What were the symptoms when this occurred? I would think there would have to be alot of the dust to make the sensor sense the duckbill was always in the home position.
The ferrous dust comes from our soils. I was warned about this problem by the dealer tech when he came out to set the balers up when they were new. It seems to be a problem mainly when baling cornstalks in very low humidity conditions when the raking and baling processes can significantly aerosolize soil dust. The symptom of this problem is the wrapping cycle will start normally but then shortly after it starts the monitor will show an error and say to stop the baler. The baler will not stop wrapping if the PTO is not shut off. There will be an error code, I can't remember any more what it was. It is not a code that gets stored. All the magnetic sensors on the baler will get this buildup on them, it seems the duckbill home sensor is the first to get fooled. It takes at least a couple hundred bales for that dust to build up to levels where it causes problems. I'll see if I can get a picture of a sensor with dust buildup on it.
 

· Hay Master (Supposedly)
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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
I would say this is at least halfway to malfunctioning. The duckbill must be lowered somewhat manually to see and clean the sensor.

Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Vehicle door Door
Automotive lighting Bumper Gas Automotive exterior Tints and shades
 

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· Hay Master (Supposedly)
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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
Another update on the 2 2018 New Holland 560 Specialty Crop round balers. Never in my life have I made so many bales in one year! As mentioned above, we baled stalks this spring, then baled some hay this summer, but not a large amount really, then made a lot of bales this fall. Looked at the bale counters today and one baler has just over 10,000 bales and the other just over 13,000 bales. No serious problems so for. Tweaked some things this summer, most notably welding the starter roll rods fully. It was very dry this fall so ferrous dust buildup on the sensors was a chronic problem. Sensors need to be cleaned daily to guarantee trouble free operation. Also learned that the net roll counter sensor attracts ferrous dust and will malfunction. Had a bearing on a net roll counter lock and cause an over wrapped bale. Couple chain idler bearings needed to be replaced as well. Pretty easy to keep them on hand and replace them as needed. The ones to watch are the on the starter roll drive chain and the sledge roll drive chain. They get net wrap in them which takes out the seal.

A note about the declutch delete. It turns out that for whatever reason, even a declutch that is not being used as a declutch will fail. Presumable at some point during the baling cycle the jaws separate and slam back together again and over time the jaws will begin to chip out until there is no jaw left to engage. We replaced the declutch style drive with the one piece sprocket that I think is from the 2019 models. So far so good on them.

Ran across one other bit of idiocy, the first smooth roll that the net runs across after coming off the net roll. The bearing system that holds it in place is pitifully weak and fails. Fortunately it is not a crippling failure, just one of those things that can be put off till there is time to fix it.

Hate to think about it but I think the CVs in the PTO are wore out and need to be replaced. Really wish I could just scrap the CV idea. They are nice when they are new but just don't last long enough.

Pick up tines are getting near the end of their useful life as well. Those of you that bale only hay will get far more life out of them that I do. For what it's worth I have not replaced a single tine yet. Each baler is missing a few. By comparison, my first baler made it to about 8,000 bales before I tossed the whole set of tines (NH OEM steel tines) and replaced them.
 

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What are warning points?
Big brother is watching.... waiting for you to call someone a guy (when it was really a female) or perhaps callling someone a sissy (which makes you a bully, can't have those..) or maybe you once said that someone like, say....Nancy Pelosi, was ugly when everyone knows she's way more beautiful than Melania. Things like that....Big Brother will come down from on high and place warnings on your account, any guns in the household are subject to seizure and to re-education camps you will go......
(I'm just speculating but in today's upside down world, anything is possible. :( )
 

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Did welding the starter roll rods take care of the net wrapping on that roll?

I have yet to see net get into the idlers on the 560 balers. I would suspect dull knives or low net tension.

Counter roller bearings I have seen some lock up. What I have seen is the extra net put on the bale is not form the counter roller not turning and thus not counting, but the locked bearing adds additional drag to the net roll and the duckbill motor will stall.

The small smooth roll bearing problem, I have not seen. I did not think the net made much contact with that roll, but I have not sat down and actually watched what purpose it serves.

The declutch was probably worn by the time you disconnected the linkage, but the one piece sprocket will solve that issue.

1000 rpm cv drive lines wear out twice as fast as 540 cv drive lines and you are probably right the end of their life is near.

The rubber mounted pickup times seem to go on forever without a failure. In your less than optimal conditions, I was wondering how they were holding up.
 
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