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You folks that have an asphalt floor in your barn to stack hay on - I have a couple questions.

1. How is the floor constructed, ie gravel base and asphalt on top, etc.

2. How thick the layers, asphalt and any gravel beneath?

3. When you park your heavy equipment or loaded wagons on the asphalt, are they leaving any dents (for lack of a better word).

4. I'm considering asphalt as I gather one can stack square bales on it with little fear as compared to concrete, etc. Has your asphalt/stacking hay directly on it delivering the mail in terms of reduced or no mold on the bottom layer of the stack?

Any other helpful advice/info is much appreciated.

Thanks!
Bill
 

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You folks that have an asphalt floor in your barn to stack hay on - I have a couple questions.

1. How is the floor constructed, ie gravel base and asphalt on top, etc.

2. How thick the layers, asphalt and any gravel beneath?

3. When you park your heavy equipment or loaded wagons on the asphalt, are they leaving any dents (for lack of a better word).

4. I'm considering asphalt as I gather one can stack square bales on it with little fear as compared to concrete, etc. Has your asphalt/stacking hay directly on it delivering the mail in terms of reduced or no mold on the bottom layer of the stack?

Any other helpful advice/info is much appreciated.

Thanks!
Bill
Hi Bill!

1. Yep, compacted roadbase gravel and then asphalt on top.

2. Want to say it was 4" for both.

3. Asphalt will take at least a year to really cure and harden. During that time, I'd try to avoid parking anything heavy on it as in lots of weight on a small surface area.

4. Yeah, we stack straight out of the field, on to the asphalt, and a lot of it stays there most of the winter and into the next spring. Absolutely no rising damp issues. If your hay is too wet, naturally, you're going to have mold, but that would happen regardless of your floor choice.

If you've got any questions, don't hesitate to ask!
 

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Hi Bill!

1. Yep, compacted roadbase gravel and then asphalt on top.
2. Want to say it was 4" for both.
3. Asphalt will take at least a year to really cure and harden. During that time, I'd try to avoid parking anything heavy on it as in lots of weight on a small surface area.
4. Yeah, we stack straight out of the field, on to the asphalt, and a lot of it stays there most of the winter and into the next spring. Absolutely no rising damp issues. If your hay is too wet, naturally, you're going to have mold, but that would happen regardless of your floor choice.

If you've got any questions, don't hesitate to ask!
So do they use a paver to lay the tar out and roll it like they do a road or parking lot.?seems like things would be pretty tight paving inside a building.
 

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Here is what I would do. Over dig by two feet, put in 16" of Pit run over some separation fabric, and then 8" of 3/4" road base. All compacted. That should make you a good base for putting your asphalt on.
 

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Thanks for your questions about using an asphalt floor for stacking hay in a barn.
1. The construction of an asphalt floor typically includes a gravel base, followed by asphalt on top. The gravel base provides a stable foundation for the asphalt layer.
2. The thickness of the layers can vary, but typically the gravel base is 4-6 inches thick, and the asphalt layer is 2-3 inches thick.
3. When it comes to heavy equipment or loaded wagons, the asphalt may show some wear and tear over time, but it is generally durable enough to withstand the weight.
4. One of the benefits of using asphalt for stacking hay is that it reduces the risk of mold growing on the bottom layer of the stack, as it is a non-porous surface.
If you're looking for more information and tips on building an asphalt floor for your barn, you can visit https://www.paveallohio.com/ for more resources. As always, it's a good idea to consult with an experienced contractor to get specific recommendations and guidelines for your project.
 
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