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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New Video!

AgriCompact Technologies GmbH: Company Presentation


We are looking forward to setting up YOUR hay bale drying project!

Have a good Hay!:)

Sabine Zastrow
Your AgriCompact haydryers Team

AgriCompact Technologies GmbH
we deliver hay bale drying solutions.always.also in north america.

www.haydryers.com
 

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Very good vid.....needs more coverage of the dryer I think but I enjoyed it, thanks
Glad I don't have to have one......
Thank you for your feedback, "somedevildawg" ! Good you liked our company presentation video. We will produce more drone videos - so stay tuned... more to come! Have a good Hay! :)

The AgriCompact haydryers Team

AgriCompact Technologies GmbH, Germany

we deliver hay bale drying solutions. always. also in north america.

www.haydryers.com
 

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Yes, I am glad I live in the Sunbelt. I can only imagine what kind of costs, maintenance, and payoff would be....and it would add another handling step before storage....it is hard to beat old Sol here.

Regards, Mike
 

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Beautiful scenery and those Germans appear to have mastered making hay.
Thankyou for your kind feedback "Tx Jim"! Yes, indeed we have been evolving our hay drying solutions since 1970! The results can be seen in any weather and climate condition and our customers´ success is our pride! :)

If you may be interested, here comes a link to our business philosophy:

http://www.agricompact-technologies.com/agricompact-about-us/
 

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Yes, I am glad I live in the Sunbelt. I can only imagine what kind of costs, maintenance, and payoff would be....and it would add another handling step before storage....it is hard to beat old Sol here.

Regards, Mike
Hi Mike!

Thankyou for your feedback! Your forage remains nice´n´green? Is the wonderful hay scent preserved and is it highly palatable? What about the nutrients (proteins etc.)? No development of mould/fermentation? No usage of chemical treatment to prevent mould?
 

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I Lived in Northern Germany for two years. The German farmers (and everyone else in Germany) know how to get the work done. Few people on the planet can work harder/smarter.

I can make some suggestions which are purely from my take on it, and not meant to be offensive.

1. Get straight to the facts about the dryer.

2. Americans are already drenched in the ideas that the Earth is a beautiful place, farming needs to be preserved, etc. Some call this propaganda.

3. I would guess that American science is responsible for well over 50% of all agriculture research, but Americans are only 5% of the world's population, so American farmers are smart.

4. Unlike Europe, the USA has a lot of vacant land. We don't need to squeeze-out perfect efficiency on every square foot of land. This might work against your business.

5. Also remember Euro farmers are heavily subsidized. See this from Yale U. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/european-subsidies-stray-farm

There is one question you can answer that will determine how well your dryer will sell here in the USA: Based on the costs of the dryer, the life of the dryer, and energy costs here in the states, "How much will it cost to dry a ton of hay from 35% moisture to 16% moisture, and how are these costs expensed (amortized) over 5 years, 10 years, 20 years, etc."

I suggest that you employ an American accountant that is an expert in agriculture to make a plan for you. This plan will be a financial kit the farmer can take to a bank. The farmer will then say: "Loan me the money for this dryer and I will be able to pay you back in____ years because my cash flow will be improved greatly."

Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I Lived in Northern Germany for two years. The German farmers (and everyone else in Germany) know how to get the work done. Few people on the planet can work harder/smarter.

I can make some suggestions which are purely from my take on it, and not meant to be offensive.

1. Get straight to the facts about the dryer.

2. Americans are already drenched in the ideas that the Earth is a beautiful place, farming needs to be preserved, etc. Some call this propaganda.

3. I would guess that American science is responsible for well over 50% of all agriculture research, but Americans are only 5% of the world's population, so American farmers are smart.

4. Unlike Europe, the USA has a lot of vacant land. We don't need to squeeze-out perfect efficiency on every square foot of land. This might work against your business.

5. Also remember Euro farmers are heavily subsidized. See this from Yale U. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/european-subsidies-stray-farm

There is one question you can answer that will determine how well your dryer will sell here in the USA: Based on the costs of the dryer, the life of the dryer, and energy costs here in the states, "How much will it cost to dry a ton of hay from 35% moisture to 16% moisture, and how are these costs expensed (amortized) over 5 years, 10 years, 20 years, etc."

I suggest that you employ an American accountant that is an expert in agriculture to make a plan for you. This plan will be a financial kit the farmer can take to a bank. The farmer will then say: "Loan me the money for this dryer and I will be able to pay you back in____ years because my cash flow will be improved greatly."

Best of luck!

Thankyou very much, Hugh, for your profound feedback. We do appreciate it. Just a short remark to the Euro farmers and the subsidies of which you spoke:

Our Hay Dryers, Compact are cost-efficient non-important if the farmer gets subsidized or not. This is a paramount point in our business philosophy. The farmer has to be absolutely on the safe side with our Hay Dryer, Compact and not depending on subsidies which "tomorrow" may not be granted any more. Just to let you know.

Thank you again for your good wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I Lived in Northern Germany for two years. The German farmers (and everyone else in Germany) know how to get the work done. Few people on the planet can work harder/smarter.

I can make some suggestions which are purely from my take on it, and not meant to be offensive.

1. Get straight to the facts about the dryer.

2. Americans are already drenched in the ideas that the Earth is a beautiful place, farming needs to be preserved, etc. Some call this propaganda.

3. I would guess that American science is responsible for well over 50% of all agriculture research, but Americans are only 5% of the world's population, so American farmers are smart.

4. Unlike Europe, the USA has a lot of vacant land. We don't need to squeeze-out perfect efficiency on every square foot of land. This might work against your business.

5. Also remember Euro farmers are heavily subsidized. See this from Yale U. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/european-subsidies-stray-farm

There is one question you can answer that will determine how well your dryer will sell here in the USA: Based on the costs of the dryer, the life of the dryer, and energy costs here in the states, "How much will it cost to dry a ton of hay from 35% moisture to 16% moisture, and how are these costs expensed (amortized) over 5 years, 10 years, 20 years, etc."

I suggest that you employ an American accountant that is an expert in agriculture to make a plan for you. This plan will be a financial kit the farmer can take to a bank. The farmer will then say: "Loan me the money for this dryer and I will be able to pay you back in____ years because my cash flow will be improved greatly."

Best of luck!
Thankyou very much, Hugh, for your profound feedback. We do appreciate it. Just a short remark to the Euro farmers and the subsidies of which you spoke:

Our Hay Dryers, Compact are cost-efficient non-important if the farmer gets subsidized or not. This is a paramount point in our business philosophy. The farmer has to be absolutely on the safe side with our Hay Dryer, Compact and not depending on subsidies which "tomorrow" may not be granted any more. Just to let you know.

Thank you again for your good wishes.
 

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Hi Mike!

Thankyou for your feedback! Your forage remains nice´n´green? Is the wonderful hay scent preserved and is it highly palatable? What about the nutrients (proteins etc.)? No development of mould/fermentation? No usage of chemical treatment to prevent mould?
My forage is nice an green usually....especially considering cost of investment....smell is pretty good according to my customers and it tests about like it should. No mold and of course no fermentation because it is dried properly.

I have answered your questions, now answer mine that I asked in another of your posts. What are the costs of the various unit sizes here in North America. If you cannot answer forthright, then we have heard enough about your product. If we want any more information each individual can contact you on their own. Product promotion does come with a cost....we welcome product information that is complete.

Regards, Mike
 

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It's a very interesting concept, but seems to have a small market. I'd have a hard time believing it is justifiable on a large scale, as most producers who would be interested in this unit, need it to be large enough to dry hundreds of tons at a time.
 

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I'll speak up in defense of pricing, it's like answering what a corn drying setup will cost. It depends on the tons per hour, energy sources available etc.
 

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I'll speak up in defense of pricing, it's like answering what a corn drying setup will cost. It depends on the tons per hour, energy sources available etc.
Well not exactly....they are offering specific units to be placed into your constructed metal or concrete structure. What do these specific units run is the basic question that I asked.

Compact Hay Dryer 1030 (suitable for 16/18 bales)

Compact Hay Dryer 1040 (suitable for 20/22bales)

Compact Hay Dryer 1050 (suitable for 24/28bales)

Compact Hay Dryer 1060 (suitable for 30/34bales)

Compact Hay Dryer 1080 (suitable for 36/44 bales)

Compact Hay Dryer 1100 (suitable for 48/56 bales)
 

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Yes but see the note below that, it looses something in the translation but you have to pick a fan power source, a heat source, recircuation if needed etc. The "hay dryer" base unit is the metal box you put the bales on. Lots of their competitors have to have ducts built into floors etc and don't offer the prefab box for sticking the hay on/in.

Edit - reading between the lines I'm assuming single or double combustion chamber is probably direct or indirect fired in english. Not sure if inverter is for variable speed drive fan or phase conversion.

Our COMPACT HAY DRYER models can be equipped with:

- Electric motor

- Diesel engine

- PTO of the tractor

- Inverter

- Single or double Combustion Chamber (for liquid or gaseous fuels)

- Single or double Combustion Chamber (for wood pellet burners)

- Hot Water Radiators for BIOGAS

- PLC with software for multiple work programs
 

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After posting the above I could not finish after pasting. The above sizes is for concrete for large squares and the models they offer, they also offer for rounds and metallic bases and they have different sizes for those also. Folks are interested in costs to see how they will pencil for their area. If I lived in a climate that was annually plagued by rain, I could be highly interested in this system. But one has to know the costs to see if you can warrant the additional costs that you would have to charge for your hay to produce and dry and pay for this system. They list model sizes so they could list the North American price for specific units if they wanted to....they already tell you what each different unit capacity is.

Regards, Mike
 

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Just from working a bit with other types of HVAC systems that aren't turn key and require finding out a clients use/needs, I don't think they would publish list prices, especially given the limited competition. I agree with you though, they need to publish some case studies of order of magnitude costs for a sample system and its capacities, and any options that may have boosted cost.

A PTO powered base unit with no heating is going to be about 1/50 to 1/25 the cost of a diesel powered, dehumidificaton, pellet heated model with PLC controls, there will be a huge span in pricing

After posting the above I could not finish after pasting. The above sizes is for concrete for large squares and the models they offer, they also offer for rounds and metallic bases and they have different sizes for those also. Folks are interested in costs to see how they will pencil for their area. If I lived in a climate that was annually plagued by rain, I could be highly interested in this system. But one has to know the costs to see if you can warrant the additional costs that you would have to charge for your hay to produce and dry and pay for this system. They list model sizes so they could list the North American price for specific units if they wanted to....they already tell you what each different unit capacity is.

Regards, Mike
 
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