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I bale several thousand bale of straw a year and I am currently looking to add another baler. I run a 540 CIH right now which is the same as the NH 575. I love the capacity of this baler but isn't the most consistent baler I've seen. Also looking into the maneuverability of the inline as I have bought a Kuhn accumulator to run this year thought that might be another advantage. Ive read most all the threads on this site concerning the 1840 and noticed guys complaining about clumps in windrows and heavy conditions shearing pins often. However, these were mostly in hay. We run a stripper head and a 21' swather to cut the straw, so straw is full length and windrows can be pretty hefty. So my question is will this new inline have the capacity in the straw vs the NH. I could handle a little less capacity for the better bale quality. Also, will the bigger windrow be a problem with the shear pins? Havnt seen any discussion of these balers in straw so any input is appreciated!
 

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I know of only a couple of fellas here that have used a 1840, but I have not heard anyone say anything about baling straw. I would expect capacity wise for the 1840 to approach NH.

Regards, Mike
 

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I have a 1840 and did 13000 hay bales last year. 1-3rd cuttings. I have not read anything on here about the 1840's breaking shear bolts or having clump problems. Your confusing it with the 1835,37, and 39's. They re-engineered the stuffer geometry on the 40's. I didn't break one sheer bolt in the 13000 bales and I baled some really big windrows. Hell, I baled a full size shovel and didn't even know it until the hay crew pulled 18 inch pieces of the handle and the shovel head out of the bales.You wont have any problems with straw.
 

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Yeah, I think everyone hit the head on the nail; sounds like you're mistaking the 1839 for the 1840.

When the 1840 came out, there were two big changes in the feeding area:

-they changed the stuffer geometry as was pointed out earlier. This was largely just to improve capacity; I don't think it had much to do with breaking shear bolts.

-the feeding augers were reversed; from down-turning to up-turning. There's an earlier thread (linked below) where I linked some videos, the down-turning augers would pinch crop into the pickup pan which made it difficult for the stuffer to pull crop in. This put a lot of load on the stuffer and would cause it to break shear bolts if you were in the right crop. When the 1839 came out, it was aimed at the alfalfa market and never had any problems in those crops, but the 1839 began to bleed into other markets and it was necessary to make changes to help it out. The 1839 can be fitted with an auger reversing kit, but still lacks the better stuffer geometry and longer bale chamber of the 1840.

http://www.haytalk.com/forums/topic/49377-thinking-of-getting-hesstonmf-1850-have-question/
 
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