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Resicore residual - Ah, to plant or not to plant?


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#1 GWHunter

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 10:19 AM

Howdy everyone,

 

I'm a real neophyte to all this herbicide/pesticide stuff but I've learned enough to ask questions first! I've picked up my neighbors field and intend to plant alfalfa but, I found out from my agronomist that previous tenant used Resicore herbicide 2 1/2 pints  (I assume that is per acre) on 6/13/2020. Agronomist seemed to think that at that dosing level (without too much overspray) that I may be fine to plant alfalfa. From the Resicore label reading I've done that doesn't quite add up. What says you guys?

 

Next question: what does a guy plant in the interim? I'm looking for some hay crop that ideally I can sell to my horse folks.(oh, and I know- straight up alfalfa for horses? Ya that's what they want, lots of competition people want "Jacked up hay") Any ideas for a Minnesota annual crop?

 

Thanks in advance for your help

 

Brad



#2 TJ Hendren

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 04:23 PM

I am not familiar with that herbicide but i would have a bioassay done before i put a crop as expensive as alfalfa in. Some of that residual herbicide hangs around for a long time at high rates. It would be a whole lot cheaper than lost alfalfa seed.  



#3 weedman

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Posted 08 April 2021 - 05:48 PM

The main active in that product you have to worry about is clopyralid.  It generally only persists a few months, but it is hard on legumes, and I don’t believe I would chance spending that kind of money only to have it fail.

 

Im not very up to speed on MN forage crops, but don’t believe Timothy or orchard grass do too well that far north.  Hopefully one of the others will chime in.



#4 Vol

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 05:56 AM

Looks like Resicore is a 10.5 month wait before going to alfalfa in your region.  So, the first step would be to find out when the previous tenant applied Resicore. If that does not work out for you to plant alfalfa you need to pull up and read the Resicore product label as it will tell you what other crops would fit in your available time frame. 

 

It is always critical to learn how to research and read product labels so that you can have this information at your fingertips.

 

Regards, Mike

 

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#5 GWHunter

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Posted 09 April 2021 - 09:58 AM

Thanks for the responses guys,

 

The problem is I did read the product label, that's why I was questioning my agronomist suggesting that I could plant alfalfa normally like we do in April or May. Label actually indicates that I should wait 18 months - we get 30+ average rainfall here. 

 

Just trying to find an annual that I can produce hay and get some production this year. Looks like a millet - leaning more to Japanese millet as the best choice - sounds like a PITA to get dried down! Probably not a great seller for the horse folks though.

 

Not listed is any of the grasses. Timothy and Orchard do well up here but because they are not listed, I speculate that Resicore will kill (not allow germination) all grasses. I'm guessing all grasses would fall under the 18 month restriction. 

 

These long residual herbicides are great for the corn/soybean producers but they make it hard to rotate in other crops.

 

Brad



#6 Vol

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Posted 10 April 2021 - 06:08 PM

Thanks for the responses guys,

 

The problem is I did read the product label, that's why I was questioning my agronomist suggesting that I could plant alfalfa normally like we do in April or May. Label actually indicates that I should wait 18 months - we get 30+ average rainfall here. 

 

 

 

Brad

 

The more rainfall you get, the less time is your replant interval. The label says "all other states" (other than the five specifically listed) have a re-plant wait of 10.5 months. The label language does read a bit confusing.  

 

Regards, Mike 



#7 swmnhay

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Posted 12 April 2021 - 12:40 PM

higher organic matter in soil may require longer planting interval.So depending on soil types could cause more of issue.Clay knobs could be worse yet,I've had that happen on some herbicides.

 

Maybe a bit late but could of planted some seed in a coffee can of soil from the field.But some herbicides effect germ and then others as the plant grows bigger it takes in more herbicide and can kill or stunt it then

 

So many variables!

 

3? different herbicides in Resicore so it gets confusing what carries over and what doesnt



#8 endrow

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Posted 13 April 2021 - 05:19 AM

The main active in that product you have to worry about is clopyralid.  

 

 

You are correct we call that herbicide Stinger here and in our dirt it does hang around . IMO because it was applied 6/13/2020 it missed last years spring rains , had it been applied maybe something like 4/25/2020 or earlier I would plant the alfalfa , but with a June application date that would be a no for me. 

       This scenario is being run into quite often , as weeds are becoming more resistant  ,we are looking to more powerful residuals , that often cause problems the following season.   






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