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Shed Hay or Tarp


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#1 schayfarmer

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 08:15 AM

Good Morning I am new to the site and live in South Carolina I was just wondering what everyone thought about Tarping round bales or building sheds 



#2 Hayman1

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 09:23 AM

I  have done both.  Always on pallets in either case.  Net wrapped.  Would never go back to tarps if I could avoid it.  Mine were always for sale and the color retention of being in a shed was a big difference in sale interest.  Now if you are feeding them to your own stock, all you have to do is make yourself happy.


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#3 slowzuki

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 10:44 AM

Not sure what weather you have but I hate tarps from doing that storage method for a few years. They spend all fall getting ripped off in storms. Once the snow comes they get frozen into snow and ripped when trying to get bales out. Then the wind get ahold of the tarp and destroys it.
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#4 broadriverhay

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 12:09 PM

Search Clemson Hay Storage . They did research on this topic and published some good info. That was a topic covered by our Clemson Extension Agent one night . Good info.



#5 broadriverhay

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 12:10 PM

@schayfarmer. What part of SC you from? I'm in Fairfield county.



#6 mlappin

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 12:37 PM

Absolutely hate tarps for all the reasons already mentioned and what hasn’t been mentioned is the damn raccoons will get under them, shit every wire they can then get lazy and rip holes in em to get out. I have enough hoop buildings now to avoid tarps altogether.


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#7 SCtrailrider

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 04:25 PM

I'm outside Spartanburg ....   And I also hate tarps... I had a shed put up several years ago, love it....

 

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#8 DSLinc1017

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 07:57 PM

Tarps S......K !  particularly with snow.    

And that's all I have to say about that...


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#9 chevytaHOE5674

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 10:04 PM

Tarps aren't much fun in the snow but they pencil out a lot easier than a hay shed. Maybe down south where you can get away with a "cheap" building like SCtrailrider posted a hay shed is more affordable, UP here in snow country that building wouldn't survive past November.

I store nearly 1k bales under tarp and just accept it as part of the process. For what I have invested in tarps I couldn't begin to put up another building.

#10 Troy Farmer

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 10:31 PM

I have one customer who uses tarps and pallets. He is very meticulous with his stacking and tarping.  He uses 2 liter bottles tied in the eyes of the tarps to hold them tight.  He has had good results.  He is the only one I have seen around here who has had good results!  

 

I wouldn't use tarps myself.  Been there done that and it was a complete disaster!

 

A good area, higher than the surrounding ground, away from trees and use pallets.  Here in SC if you keep it off the ground you will save hay without the hassle of a tarp.  If you are determined to cover the hay invest in a "Latino Carport"  like SCtrailrider.  You won't regret it.



#11 slowzuki

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Posted 04 March 2021 - 10:55 PM

1000 bales under tarp - for me would be 22 tarps, 5500$. I never get more than 2 years service so 2250$ per year. Ruin about 10% of the hay under tarp from various damage. 100 bales lost, say 5000$. Plus the pain in the arse they are.

It’s about 30- 50,000$ to put up a tarp building or pole barn big enough for 1000 bales. Very fuzzy math but I’d say if you plan to do it more than 5 years put up the storage.
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#12 chevytaHOE5674

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 08:01 AM

10 tarps with a cost of less than 3k dollars. Oldest is 7 or 8 years old and still going strong.

50k won't build a building large enough UP here to withstand our environment. A fabric or hoop building is a pipe dream. Friend put this UP last fall salesman said it would handle out weather no problem. Well 60" of snow in 3 days, -30 degrees, and 60mph said that was a lie.

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#13 RockmartGA

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 08:29 AM

We have had a couple of previous threads about tarping.   From what I understand, tarping appears to be a regional issue.  Those in the Great White North seem to have better results than us down here in the South East, with moisture control being our biggest enemy in the South.

 

In the Southeast, we have to contend with ground moisture year round.  I've tarped round bales and square bales, with round bales faring much better than the squares.  Rounds are very forgiving and do very well if you can keep them off the ground - pressure treated posts or plastic pallets.

 

With squares, you also need to keep them off the ground and tarp in a way that you have good air circulation - you don't want to create a "moisture trap".

 

Since we don't have to contend with the snow load down South, a simple pole building with a shed roof is relatively inexpensive and works well.


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#14 cjsr8595

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 09:10 AM

I built a new hay barn last year, best money I've ever spent.  


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#15 Beav

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 11:59 AM

use tarps if we run out of space in the buildings, Inland tarp makes the ones we use several different sizes I think the last one we got was around $400 and covers 60 4x5 bales stacked 3-2-1 pyramid style it has been a while since we bought any new ones. These are sold as kits that include the tiedown ropes. If you are careful you can get 5 to 7 years out of them. https://www.inlandta...om/vc/hay-tarps



#16 CowboyRam

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Posted 05 March 2021 - 02:04 PM

I can buy a lot of tarps for what it would cost me for the materials to build a building.  I can buy a 15'x54' Mytee tarp for about $140 plus shipping, and they last about three years, depending on the wind.  I did lose a good tarp this year because the strings on one side broke and I did not catch early enough.  We had some pretty bad winds a couple weeks ago.  Took the entire roof of a building in town.  



#17 slowzuki

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 09:06 AM

I just can’t make tarps last, have tried several brands, several tensioning methods. If they survive the winds, which is rare, they get ruining removing them to feed if there is any snow around. If I’m lucky there is a big thaw and can remove tarp and move all the hay into indoor storage and save the tarp. Impossible to gradually remove tarp and feed from stack, even two bales stacked on loose end are not enough to pin it down.

Meanwhile I have the same type of tarp installed on a cheap used tarp building frame for my boat, it’s 7 or 8 years old, only a couple of eyes damaged.

#18 Hayman1

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 10:48 AM

I just can’t make tarps last, have tried several brands, several tensioning methods. If they survive the winds, which is rare, they get ruining removing them to feed if there is any snow around. If I’m lucky there is a big thaw and can remove tarp and move all the hay into indoor storage and save the tarp. Impossible to gradually remove tarp and feed from stack, even two bales stacked on loose end are not enough to pin it down.

Meanwhile I have the same type of tarp installed on a cheap used tarp building frame for my boat, it’s 7 or 8 years old, only a couple of eyes damaged.

Slow- you found the secret, less hay, more boats, more fun :D .  unless you listen to a prior boat owner, the best two days of their life, the day they got the boat, and the day they got rid of the boat.  Never owned one myself so no personal knowledge.



#19 slowzuki

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Posted 06 March 2021 - 11:35 AM

Boat is a little commercial fishing type fibreglass rig, ie hose out interior, no toilet or water system to maintain. Still a pain in the butt to keep maintained. The marine companies would give John Deere a run for their money in part prices too!




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