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Frost seeding clover into standing winter wheat?


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#1 GregN

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Posted 26 January 2021 - 05:53 PM

Does anyone have any experience frost seeding Ladino clover into an existing stand of winter wheat.

 

 

I have found some literature that suggests that it is possible.  

 

Wheat harvest for us is typically the last week in June.  (SE Indiana)

 

 

How many cuttings of hay could I expect to get, and what kind of tonnage, if you have done this sort of thing.

 

 

Thinking I could possibly come out better than the gamble of double crop beans, although if the weather is dry that will affect the tonnage of hay as well.  Also thinking of a better nitrogen credit if I terminate the clover the next spring immediately before planting corn, possibly even getting an early spring cutting, although that might be overly optimistic.

 

 

 


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#2 HayMike

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Posted 26 January 2021 - 09:26 PM

That was common around here in the 50's-70's.  Yield would vary a great deal with the weather.  It was the way to establish hay fields, with the timothy sown with the wheat.


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#3 endrow

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 06:55 AM

That was common around here in the 50's-70's.  Yield would vary a great deal with the weather.  It was the way to establish hay fields, with the timothy sown with the wheat.

Yes indeed I lived in a time in my younger years when that was very common . I would not do it because you sure cant maximize your wheat  yields and it will probably be a forage stand that would not live up to be profitable in the long run . ........ Only thing i can say todays weeds are not yr gpaws weeds . IMO if you got heavy henbit chickweed or wintergrasses you cannot spin a couple of pounds of clover on  and expect cure all  . Thoughts like this will very over the next couple of months and depends if you are, putting out a crop to provide livelihood for you and the family or  you have a good day job .



#4 r82230

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 08:24 AM

I've seen it done in MY area, but usually by dairy guys, so they can chop it (haylage or balage, clover hard to make dry hay).  The following spring will again chop it in late May and follow with corn that is also going to be chopped.  Similar to what they do with old hay fields, chop in May and put into corn for silage.

 

As Endrow mentions, a whole different set of weed pressure in today's world. YMMV 

 

Larry


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#5 mstuck21

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 08:48 AM

I had a neighbor that did teff after wheat.. guys are usually itching to start wheat around Father’s Day here.. might only allow for 2 cuts waiting until end of June to get started .. don’t know how well it pencils out but it could be done... he no tilled straight into it the following spring

#6 siscofarms

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Posted 27 January 2021 - 09:31 AM

Are YOU keeping that hay ? You can harvest the wheat and if youve put 8lbs or more of clover down , you should have a hell of a stand . But the first cutting will be a lot of straw . Not much for selling but is alright if for yourself . The clover will probably go dormat after that because of the heat , ladino just doesnt like it  . If hay is that important , red clover will do better , it will handle summer heat around here better . I have seen guys do this , wheat , hay , then planted milo . It handles heat and dry pretty good .


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#7 ttazzman

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Posted 02 February 2021 - 12:33 AM

That was common around here in the 50's-70's.  Yield would vary a great deal with the weather.  It was the way to establish hay fields, with the timothy sown with the wheat.

are you saying they frost seeded the timothy into the wheat? or frost seeded clover into a timothy wheat mix? ........can timothy be frost seeded?



#8 siscofarms

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Posted 08 February 2021 - 09:51 AM

Timothy can be frost seeded but results may vary . Where most of the time clover will catch and grow pretty good , Timothy is a real hit and miss . Timothy should be in the drill with the wheat , either mixed in or preferably in a small seed box .


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