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Older model baler for baleage


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#1 del1

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 12:23 PM

Good day to all, I would like some advice on a baler for baleage. Is anyone running a 6,000 to 8,000 dollar baler for making baleage? If you are what baler do you have? Or what advice would there be for a baler in this price range? Would we need to look at 8,000 to 10,000 dollar range, to get a baler that will perform good for baleage. Will be making around 150 to 200 bales. Thanks for your input.

#2 8350HiTech

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 01:12 PM

You could do that with a 90s model silage special NH easily.
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#3 TJ Hendren

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 06:38 PM

I'm planning on doing it with a 95 model NH 650. Everyone says it will do it so we will see. They run around 5K now.

#4 r82230

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 06:52 PM

Welcome Del,

 

I agree with Hi Tech, but I'm not certain whether or not you would need a net wrap or not.  I have to defer that part of the equation to those much wiser than I.   But along with thinking a silage special (no matter what color) would be wise.  What is your local dealer support looking like might also fit into the equation.  If you are close enough Mike10 could be an excellent resource, too.  Hopefully, you got the ponies to put in front of a silage special. 

 

Larry



#5 del1

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 07:20 PM

Thanks for the responses. Local dealers here for us in southern Indiana would be John Deere, Vermeer, New Holland, and Case IH. Net wrap would be great but doesn't need to be.

#6 slowzuki

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 09:13 PM

Gehl / class fixed chamber roller balers work too. Chain and slat fixed chamber ones mostly do too.

#7 8350HiTech

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 09:53 PM

Welcome Del,

I agree with Hi Tech, but I'm not certain whether or not you would need a net wrap or not. I have to defer that part of the equation to those much wiser than I. But along with thinking a silage special (no matter what color) would be wise. What is your local dealer support looking like might also fit into the equation. If you are close enough Mike10 could be an excellent resource, too. Hopefully, you got the ponies to put in front of a silage special.

Larry


I doubt he needs a bigger team unless he’s running knives.

#8 U Lazy V Ranch

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Posted 12 January 2021 - 11:29 PM

One of the guys here in the valley still runs 3 of the old NH 849's for his haylage and swears by them.  He got all sweaty when I told him I still have one sitting in the shed....up until then, I figured it was going to be scrap some day.  :confused:

John



#9 AndyH359

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 06:43 AM

I run a JD 335 (4x4 from the early 90's) on a MF4608 (85 HP, 65 HP on the PTO) and put up 200-300 silage bales of grass hay a year.  Baler does twine only.  Only thing to be careful of is not to use treated sisal twine on bales you are going to wrap.  The sisal treatment is supposedly not good for the plastic.  So I run poly twine on my round bales.  Been running this setup for about 4 years.  (I won't tell you that I have not had a lick of trouble with this setup because then the fates would be after me and will kick my a$$ this summer.  Whoever said hay farmers are not superstitious never met a hay farmer.)

 

The baler has the 'silage extras' which are some scrapers added to a front roller and some more along the inside of the bale chamber.  They were on the baler when I bought it from the original owner in 2012.  (I swear I saw the old man crying as I was pulling out of his driveway with the baler.)  I did dry hay with it for a few years and then bought a bale wrapper and started doing silage bales also.

 

My only issue is if I try do wetter hay (50-60% moisture) on some of my hills the sticky hay has too much drag on the side of the bale chamber when the baler leans on the hills and the belts slip when I get about 3/4 of a bale in the chamber.  So I have just adjusted my hay production to do square bales on the hillier fields and save the flatter fields for silage bales.  (That also makes it easier to keep the round bales in the field and out of the creek and my neighbor's lawn.)

 

I paid $6k for the baler in 2012.  I see plenty of 335's floating around in the $6k range still.



#10 del1

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 08:52 AM

Thanks for the responses,its very helpful. Keep them coming. If anyone got more good experience to share.

#11 pettibone

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 08:53 AM

I use a NH 648 to do between 5- 6 hundred bales a year and it does a good job. Had a JD330 for quite a while before the NH and would shy away from anything like that



#12 Gearclash

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 09:09 AM

Couple years ago I used my late model but non silage round baler to make some baleage.  It was alfalfa with moisture in the low 30s.  No problem with the baler at all.  I did run a little more pressure than we usually do, and slowed down a gear to improve bale density.  Also made the bale less than full size to fit the wrapper (inline) and keep the total bale weight safe for the baler.


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#13 IH 1586

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 11:58 AM

I did custom baleage with a non silage JD 458. It did have a high moisture kit in it. 10,000 plus bales The biggest thing I recommend is make sure the top of the windrow is dry (no dew). Twine only could get you in your price range.


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#14 Gearclash

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Posted 13 January 2021 - 07:01 PM

Regarding your budget, I’ve got a 2007 New Holland BR780A wide pickup with netwrap setting on my yard that I would be happy to get $4,000 for.  It needs a couple thousand in work, then it would run for while again.  Even has endless belts.



#15 Tx Jim

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 07:38 AM

$4000 sounds cheap for 14 yr old rd baler even if it needs $2K in repairs. I would not sell my '05 baler for that amount.

 

May I ask what is the advantage of endless belts over laced belts other than no need to change pins or lacings? I've never experienced any bad issues with the lacings my baler utilizes if I change pins on bale count described in operators manual.

Thanks, Jim



#16 Gearclash

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 08:22 AM

As far as I know the big thing is as you say no need to mess with pins and lacings.  Keep in mind that until the New Holland 560 was introduced, the only belt lacing NH offered was the Clipper, which, as I understand, needs more frequent freshening up that what you are probably used to with the Alligator lacing on Deere balers.  I know from experience if I wanted to really stay on top of lacing maintenance while baling crop residues, I would be changing pins every 2-3-4 baling days. Baleage puts more stress on belts so the endless belts are more desirable for that.



#17 Tx Jim

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 09:31 AM

Thanks for reply. I agree Mato/Alligator type lacings are way advanced to clipper lacings. Granted I haven't baled near as many stalk bales as you Northern baler operators but I didn't know stalks affected pins that much. I can envision the advantage of endless belts if you're needing to change pins every 2-3-4 days! How many stalk bales do you normally average baling a day with 1 baler?  



#18 Gearclash

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 10:16 AM

Thanks for reply. I agree Mato/Alligator type lacings are way advanced to clipper lacings. Granted I haven't baled near as many stalk bales as you Northern baler operators but I didn't know stalks affected pins that much. I can envision the advantage of endless belts if you're needing to change pins every 2-3-4 days! How many stalk bales do you normally average baling a day with 1 baler?  

Clippers have one big virtue and that is the ability to easily survive a belt flip.  That is worth quite bit to me as I sometimes operate in conditions conducive to flipping belts.

 

My thought is that the soil dust that tends to be higher in two crop crop residues causes the pins to wear faster than what would typically be seen in hay.  Clipper pins really should be replaced every 1000-1500 bales in the conditions we run.  If pins don’t get replaced they will start to fail in the 3,000 bale area, and that also seems to be hard on the lacings too.

 

Average bales per day per baler is probably 2-300.  Depends a lot on the weather as sometimes fall weather doesn’t get dry enough to run very long in a day.  The record stands at 950 bales in one loooong day with both 560 balers, and before that the record was 900 bales in two very long days with my first BR780A.  


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#19 r82230

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 01:42 PM

Average bales per day per baler is probably 2-300.  Depends a lot on the weather as sometimes fall weather doesn’t get dry enough to run very long in a day.  The record stands at 950 bales in one loooong day with both 560 balers, and before that the record was 900 bales in two very long days with my first BR780A.  

 

Wow, now I better understand why you created carriers for extra rolls of net wrap.  Must have been pretty short poddy breaks too.

 

Larry


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#20 Tx Jim

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 03:41 PM

I can't remember how yrs/bales since my baler had a flipped over belt & I'm definitely not interested in going back to clipper lacings after utilizing Mato lacings for yrs!

 

But I realize I operate on virtually level ground with very small inclines.






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