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#1 NDRancher8

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 01:24 PM

OK oats has has never made sense to me me as far as seeding rates are correlated to test weight. say wheat for example is 60#s/bushel so most seed it at 2 bushels an acre or 120#s, but in more recent years big wheat farmers are saying 1.5 million seeds per acre not 2 bushels. anyhow oats is suppose to weigh 32#s/Bushel but a lot of times its 36,38, even 40+ so when you decide you want to plant it at 3 bushels/acre, do you seed at 96#s no matter the test weight? I know its probably a simple answer but I cant seem to get a straight forward one from anyone local. thanks



#2 stack em up

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 01:34 PM

I never worry about test weight on oats as drill seeds by volume not weight.Seed 3 bushel per acre
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#3 danwi

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 02:10 PM

Kernel size would also be a factor in the seeding rate. Also how well your seedbed is prepared and when sowing in early spring weather affects stand. I know not a real good answer. Start seeding with the drill set at 3 bushel and adjust from there, for your own needs. Also would matter  if you are just spreading seed.


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#4 r82230

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 03:08 PM

I never worry about test weight on oats as drill seeds by volume not weight.Seed 3 bushel per acre

+1

 

Larry



#5 NDRancher8

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 04:35 PM

thanks guys, yeah i guess maybe i should have clarified a little more. I run a jd 1560nt 15' box drill, with fertilizer in furrow, I do no tillage, just set the drill and go. another big question would be seeding depth and date. in central ND sometimes the ground doesn't reach 47degrees until middle the of March, also I've  been told 1" is optimum seeding depth. Is your best bet to seed as soon as the ground temp reaches that 47ish degrees. and then with depth (I'm always very dry here, with a very sandy loam soil) go down until you hit moisture even it is say, 2". thanks



#6 danwi

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Posted 28 November 2020 - 10:07 PM

Snow on oats is poor mans fertilizer. Usually plant as early as you can if the ground can be worked. Have planted oats a time or 2 when you couldn't plant  next to a tree line because all the snow hadn't melted yet. 


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#7 endrow

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 03:30 AM

OK oats has has never made sense to me me as far as seeding rates are correlated to test weight. say wheat for example is 60#s/bushel so most seed it at 2 bushels an acre or 120#s, but in more recent years big wheat farmers are saying 1.5 million seeds per acre not 2 bushels. anyhow oats is suppose to weigh 32#s/Bushel but a lot of times its 36,38, even 40+ so when you decide you want to plant it at 3 bushels/acre, do you seed at 96#s no matter the test weight? I know its probably a simple answer but I cant seem to get a straight forward one from anyone local. thanks

You make a good point and we are finding seed count is important and can pay , as you  say 40# oats  will not be a bushel when you buy seed it will be a 32# unit .. Thus oats could vary from 11,000 to 17,000 seeds per pond . So you seeding rate could vary from 1million to greater than 1.5 million  per acre .  Here 1.5 would be to much and would lodge and also lower test weight . Also at 1M even , with oats ,you  usually deduct 10% for germ and another 10% for survival of the fittest in seed bed . So    1M would be a bit light and down goes the yield from day 1  not to mention weed control . Or you can set the lever at 36 and when your done look at how much seed is left over or short etc . 

              We weigh  1/5 of a pound and manually count unless seed tag  gives a count . we make germ and other adjustments and come up with a number for us usually close to 1.3 million . On our JD1590, 24 rows. We measure planting .5 acre with GPS and catch seed from 1 row ,and weigh and multiply x2 and multiply that x24 and make adjustments .  You would not believe where that lever on the box often ends up .   

              Most will guess and I am glad it helps with the surplus grain .  


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#8 NDRancher8

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 07:53 AM

Hey guys, thanks for the responses. I like that! dawni (poor mans fertilizer). endow that's also a good idea, I usually set the handle then do the turn the drive tire method and and weigh the seed, which has proved to be pretty accurate but it is time consuming and slightly laborious. I'm defiantly going to try driving .5 acres and and gathering seed.

- now I know there's no silver bullet to 100 bushel oats but most people don't think its to hard to hit. if I was to count seeds in a row what kind of number am I looking for? 24 seeds per foot?



#9 r82230

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 08:36 AM

Snow on oats is poor mans fertilizer. Usually plant as early as you can if the ground can be worked. Have planted oats a time or 2 when you couldn't plant  next to a tree line because all the snow hadn't melted yet. 

 

Snow being poor mans fertilizer is what I always heard from my Dad and Grandpa.  Never paid any attention to soil temp.  If you can work the ground, you did and planted 1 1/2" - 2" deep. 

 

Larry


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#10 endrow

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 10:09 AM

Snow being poor mans fertilizer is what I always heard from my Dad and Grandpa.  Never paid any attention to soil temp.  If you can work the ground, you did and planted 1 1/2" - 2" deep. 

 

Larry

Thats right you can plant oats in late February here . But you cant put your alfalfa  with it , to early for that! Dont ask me how I know


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#11 stack em up

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Posted 29 November 2020 - 10:17 PM

You make a good point and we are finding seed count is important and can pay , as you  say 40# oats  will not be a bushel when you buy seed it will be a 32# unit .. Thus oats could vary from 11,000 to 17,000 seeds per pond . So you seeding rate could vary from 1million to greater than 1.5 million  per acre .  Here 1.5 would be to much and would lodge and also lower test weight . Also at 1M even , with oats ,you  usually deduct 10% for germ and another 10% for survival of the fittest in seed bed . So    1M would be a bit light and down goes the yield from day 1  not to mention weed control . Or you can set the lever at 36 and when your done look at how much seed is left over or short etc . 
              We weigh  1/5 of a pound and manually count unless seed tag  gives a count . we make germ and other adjustments and come up with a number for us usually close to 1.3 million . On our JD1590, 24 rows. We measure planting .5 acre with GPS and catch seed from 1 row ,and weigh and multiply x2 and multiply that x24 and make adjustments .  You would not believe where that lever on the box often ends up .   
              Most will guess and I am glad it helps with the surplus grain .


+1 to what encore said. If you don’t calibrate your drill, you’re basically pissing in the wind.

#12 sprout

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Posted 30 November 2020 - 10:29 AM

 A drill is just a controlled spill!  :)






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