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Replacing JD 7410 A/C compressor.... HELP

7410 A/C compressor Replacing

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#1 sunnyblueskies

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 06:50 PM

John Deere 7410 

 

Of course the A/C compressor clutch has to burn out during winter in Canada. And of course on a Saturday afternoon when stores are already closed........ 

 

I've never replaced an A/C compressor. We charged the system ourselves and all that, but never played around with the compressor. How hard is this to do and what is the best way to do it. Keeping in mind it's of course freezing outside and we have snow on the ground...... oh how much fun that will be. =(

 

Really would appreciate some input before I start the job to avoid an ' I wish I would have known before' situation. 

 

Thank you.



#2 dvcochran

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Posted 21 November 2020 - 07:36 PM

To clarify, are you replacing only the clutch or the whole compressor? If the system was working fine and the compressor is still good I would suggest just changing the clutch. 

If the compressor has mechanically failed that usually means contamination has gone into the system. You should check with more JD savvy folks but most A/C guys are going to say replace the condenser, dryer, and expansion valve when replacing a compressor. There is no good way to flush the condenser so it needs to go since it is the lowest mounted component and will accumulate contaminates. While you have the system apart inspect and flush the evaporator and clean everything up really well. You will be glad you did.

I am hearing more and more people say Not to use flush solvent and only use nitrogen to flush/purge the system. 

Make sure you get the same style compressor, make sure it is shipped with the correct amount of oil (normal) or know how much oil to replace. If you are handy with a wrench and have a reasonable amount of experience the parts replacement is straightforward. There will be several O-rings to replace. You will need a vacuum pump, charge hoses & gauge set. I suggest finding the stated charge amount to have an idea of charge. Then the rest is up to the ambient temperature, how clean the system is on reinstallation, and any charge losses. 

Changing  compressor and getting the charge right in freezing temperatures could be tough. Again, it you just need the clutch that is the way to go. 


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#3 Tx Jim

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Posted Yesterday, 07:57 AM

 If compressor requires R&R I recommend changing expansion valve, receiver/drier along with good flushing of system. I evacuate system for several hrs then check to be sure gauges stay where the were after vacuum pump is turned off. I've replaced the compressor on my '91 4255 twice since I purchased it in '93 & it has original condenser @ 11,900 hrs. Since I don't have refrigerant scales I fill AC system by gauge observation.

 

I wonder if comp clutch removal requires any special tools?


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#4 chevytaHOE5674

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Posted Yesterday, 08:18 AM

If just the clutch failed I would suggest just replacing it to save having to evac and vacuum down of the system.

Like said above if the compressor itself failed then you need to replace at a minimum the rexiever/drier and expansion valve, I usually recommend the condenser and sometimes the evaporator depending on age and ability to flush it out completely.

#5 sunnyblueskies

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Posted Yesterday, 11:46 AM

After reading Dvcochrans last night I spoke with a neighbour who works at a Ag shop. He is coming over to evac the refrigerant. 

 

The A/C didn't work anymore since last summer, but that's no big deal. This time around the clutch burnt out. I agree, it would be nice to just change the clutch, but since it is winter and the cows need to be fed it is an emergency repair and the dealer didn't have a clutch kit in stock. ( Of course) 
So the plan is to evac the refrigerant, put in the new compressor but not re-charge the system or plug the electrics in. This way the clutch will not engage but only run neutral. 
This way we can replace, flush and re-charge the whole system when winter is over and we can do it right. At least that's what the dealer suggested. 

It absolutely sucks that the 7410 only uses 1 belt for everything. At least with the older models, like 4440 one could simply take the belt of the A/C compressor and be done with it until there is time and outside temperature to fix it. With only one belt you're done when the A/C clutch craps out.


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#6 somedevildawg

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Posted Yesterday, 11:56 AM

Well, at least it’s easy to get the one belt off.....:o
Sounds like a plan....
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#7 Tx Jim

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Posted Yesterday, 12:16 PM

Why not just complete the compressor installation with correct amount of refrigerant now instead of allowing internal AC system to hopefully remain evacuated/moisture free for months??? This would be a "no brainer" if it was my tractor,

With the "global warming AKA climate change" you may need some AC this Winter!!!  :D  


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#8 JOR Farm

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Posted Yesterday, 12:46 PM

A 7410 does run 1 serpentine belt but the one on your cab model is a little longer than my open station 7410. You could Always run a belt for my model till spring.
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#9 chevytaHOE5674

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Posted Yesterday, 02:49 PM

Personally I would either run a different belt eliminating the compressor or change the compressor and vacuum down the system and recharge it now. The longer it sits without a charge is longer moisture can find its way in.
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#10 sunnyblueskies

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Posted Yesterday, 04:04 PM

We wanted to go the 'shorter belt' route, but up here in the north no one runs a 'newer style' tractor without cab. So the dealer doesn't even carry those shorter belts for the 7410 w/o cab.

 

Recharging the system: It's right now daytime high of -10 C or 14 F, not sure how recharging to a proper pressure would work in freezing cold. Won't need the A/C until next year June or July anyway and the dealer says running it like this shouldn't really hurt the compressor......... I hope he knows what he's talking about.....
As to global warming TXJim, bring it on, I'm freezing my ass off and it's only November. =D

 

Thanks for all your input guys.



#11 chevytaHOE5674

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Posted Yesterday, 05:06 PM

I guess as long as you replace the reciever drier before vacuuming the system and recharging it should be fine leaving it all winter. No issue recharging at cold temps just set your hi/lo pressures accordingly.
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#12 mlappin

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Posted Yesterday, 05:22 PM

I’d not worry about changing the condenser. I’ve had numerous compressors grenade over the years from the previous owners neglect/abuse/ignorance and just don’t be stingy with the flush, also works well to remove the condenser and lay it flat to clean it out. 1st replacement I did may have been running longer than 15 years now? Absolutely suggest recharging with nitrogen to find leaks, it also helps to scavenge any moisture out then pull a vacuum on it for hours. Old Oliver/White AC manual even suggests taking a LP torch and gently heating any metal components to help drive water out while its under a vacuum.


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