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#1 r82230

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 02:40 PM

I'm looking at buying a small roto tiller 5' or 6'l,will be running it behind a 35-40 HP Utility tractor.  Looking for some wisdom/insight to which rotation to purchase and why.

 

Should I get a rear turning roto tiller (turns opposite way of travel)?

 

or

 

a forward turning (turning same direction of travel)?

 

Will be used for tilling up food plots & possibly gardens (custom work), so I'm looking for quality/longevity.

 

Any brands that are recommended or to stay away from that you are aware of?

 

TIA

 

Larry 



#2 Trillium Farm

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 02:55 PM

IMO a roto tiller with the tines running backwards does a better job of turning the soil with less passes especially if you have low range.


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#3 JRehberg

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 03:53 PM

We have a 6' Malletti with the rear turning tines we purchased used 3 or 4 years ago.  My dad uses it for gardening and leveling out high spots around the farm; it's been a great tiller.  We looked at several brands but the Malletti seemed a little heavier built in the frame and body panels.  It's pretty stout for a 6' model.  We looked at several brands at the Sunbelt expo before purchasing ours and most of them were using beer can thickness metal for the body panels.  Rocks, sticks and roots would have really dinged them up.  You'll find all kind of "treasures" when you start putting that thing down in the dirt.  Pay close attention to the framing as well, when you hit a hard patch the frame will want to torque and you want stout enough framing/bracing to withstand those forces.  A close friend of mine has a 9' Malletti (it's a beast) and we use it for food plots at his farm.  We've worked it hard for 15 years and have never had any trouble with it.  That's what led dad and I to the Malletti brand based on my experience with my friends unit. 

 

Jesse    


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#4 r82230

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 05:05 PM

Is that brand (Malletti) still available/made? 

 

The preliminary p[an is to use a enclosed car hauling trailer for transportation of equipment, so 5' - 6' maybe 7' is also a limit.  Plus only 40 ponies, really only has maybe 32 ponies at the PTO.

 

Larry



#5 r82230

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 05:07 PM

IMO a roto tiller with the tines running backwards does a better job of turning the soil with less passes especially if you have low range.

 

Probably will be a hydrostat drive, so.................... slow speeds shouldn't be a problem.

 

Larry



#6 Snow Farmer

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 05:19 PM

We run a 7' Maschio rotovator with forward turning tines, mainly for the vegetable garden, it does a great job.

Smallest tractor we have used with it is a 53 hp (engine) diesel, so probably 40 something hp at the pto, no problem.

 

I don't know why forward or reverse turning tines would yield different results.

 

I have also used the Maschio out in the hay fields, once to prep an old 10 acre pasture for planting to hay,

another time  to prep a 20 acre field that had been plowed the previous fall, for the same reason,

worked out well in both cases, albeit quite slow.


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#7 Tx Jim

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 05:51 PM

I've owned a King Kutter ll for nearly 20 yrs. Only maintenance I've performed on it is replacing the blades. The blades were pointed similar to a toothpick. No telling how many acres this tiller been over.  As long as tractor has a low speed low gear that one utilizes when tilling I see no need for reverse rotation of tines.


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#8 Stxpecans123

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 06:45 PM

We have a mohawk 6 foot tiller. It was a cheapo. It's probably 10 years old maybe older. It has alot of acres on it. Like 100 acres worth 6 or 7 times a year for 6 or 7 years. So say conservativly say 500 acres x 6 years so 3,000 acres. Put it this way it was on a new Holland workmaster 75. It was put on that tractor and not taken off for 5 years it was all the tractor was used for. I think the tractors tach read 1500hrs when I took the tiler off it but the tach had been broken for a year or so. And we used it on another tractor before that.
Only use it here and there mostly for our personal garden now and I let my neighbor use it in his chicken houses, not sure what he does with it don't really care.
It has had 0 repairs. And I have used and abused that little guy. I thought a few years back the gearbox had gone out or somthing as it was making a horrible noise so we parked it and a few months later I was going to get the last few hours out of it to till my garden. All it was was about 100 foot of barb wire in it. Can't say enough good things about the cheapo brand mowhawk tiller we have. I am sure it cost less than. $1 an hour. Maybe less than 50 cents.

Edit to add
The tines had been replaced 4 or 5 times atleast. But I wouldn't call that a repair. The chinaman who built ours did a good job that day.

http://ag-meier.net/tillers.asp

That is the one we have looks the same. I had no clue it was forward or reverse rotation. I want to say ours is forward as I think it would try to push the tractor if you pushed the clutch in? Not sure if you can change direction? News to me.
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#9 bool

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 07:00 PM

I have a Krone 8 foot forward turning machine. It is heavily built. I have used it on a JD 2130 (70 hp) no problems. Since I started using it I have rarely bothered with disk harrows.

 

I have never heard of rear turning machines and cannot see the point of them. Surely you would want the machine to help with forward movement if it can.

 

Make sure the slip clutch is working properly.

 

Roger


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#10 HayMike

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 09:00 PM

Have a Landpride 6 foot, works better than the name brand Howard I had 35 years ago.  Forward rotation keeps the tractor moving in poor traction situations.


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#11 Farmineer95

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Posted 14 November 2020 - 08:35 AM

I have a 6’ Howse. Can turn the hitch around to get tines to go either way, can offset it he hitch to one side too. I’m thinking that there are a few companies that make the grounds engaging components for all the brands. It works, had it maybe 10 years, put it on a 65hp tractor which is plenty. It’s on the cheaper side, but if you are going to do gardens and not railroad beds, probably last a while.
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#12 Trillium Farm

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Posted 14 November 2020 - 08:44 AM

I have never heard of rear turning machines and cannot see the point of them. Surely you would want the machine to help with forward movement if it can.

Roger

The old Troy Built used to have the reverse running tines. It was done so that One wold not use it to propel, but only to work the soil and it worked independently from the traction wheels and one could select the speed of the tines. Perhaps on a tractor it may not be needed and I can see if one has the new spinning ones (spin horizontally parallel to the ground) where it isn't needed at all.



#13 JRehberg

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Posted 14 November 2020 - 09:04 AM

Larry, I think Malleti now builds roto tillers for several other brands now a days.  I don't think there labeled as Malleti anymore but I could be mistaken.  There used to be a place in Savannah or Brunswick, GA, that imported/distributed them.  We've bought some newer tines from them several years ago but for the life of me I can't find their website now.   Sorry, I'm not much help.

 

Jesse



#14 r82230

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Posted 14 November 2020 - 03:54 PM

The old Troy Built used to have the reverse running tines

 

My only two observations of roto tillers was a Craftsman (3HP?? maybe), that was forward turning with stake in the rear that you pushed down on to help hold it in place somewhat.  That holding in place is when it would dig some, if the ground was to dry or hard.

 

The other was a Troy-Bilt, that you could walk beside using one hand verses wrestling with machine. 

 

The machine both belong to my BIL, and it was quicker just to hook the tractor up IMHO to work the garden up.  In both cases, you could create a compaction layer (similar to a plow pan), that was shallow.  But both of these observations were many, many, moons ago. ;)

 

With absolutely no experience with a tractor mounted tiller is the reason for the inquiry.  Reverse turning seem to do a better job of digging down.

 

Land Pride and King Cutter are both sold locally.  And parts do wear out, although slowly it appears.

 

Thanks for the wisdom.

 

Getting closer to spending money time. ;)

 

Larry



#15 Stxpecans123

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Posted 15 November 2020 - 02:29 PM

I agree about the hrs pan. So we plant pecan trees and we tilled with a tiller on both sides for 4 years. I do think that helps the tree. Also had terrible coastal Bermuda in that field and tilling and roundup I got it under control next to the tree.
So after 3 years of tilling I was taking a soil sample and there was indeed a hard pan left by the tiller.
We stopped tilling 4 or 5 years ago in that orchard and just spray herbicide. And keep it bare dirt. Just took a soil sample in there and now with just the herbicide the hard pan is gone. Guessing from weeds and such growing then getting killed by the herbicide.




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