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AmeriGraze 600 RR alfalfa variety


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#1 vhaby

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 12:47 AM

Alfagraze 600 RR, not AmeriGraze...sorry.

 

Is (or has) anyone growing the alfalfa variety Alfagraze 600 RR? If so, what have been, or are your experiences using it as a grazing tolerant variety and possibly taking at least one cutting for hay each season? This is the variety developed by Dr. Joe Bouton for growth across southern states. Seed is contract produced and sold by America's Alfalfa.



#2 reede

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Posted 20 October 2020 - 06:37 PM

Hey Vincent, 

I have not used the Alfagraze 600RR, but I have used another out of the Bouton program, Bulldog 505.  Actually have 2 fields, one mixed with bermudagrass, and the other with novel fescue.  Mine are primarily hay fields, but I do graze them several times over the winter(here in piedmont SC, Cecil clay soil), it never goes completely dormant, and produces a bit through the winter.  Nice to be able to graze that and use it.  Also, I typically use grazing to help get my first cutting late enough that you have a prayer of making dry hay.  I'm a square bale only, non-baleage sort.  So, grazing about the first of April sets me up for a first of May first cutting, which is about the first chance we have of getting hay dry.  It has stood up well to the grazing.  I am grazing horses, strip grazing or running a leading fence.  


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#3 JOR Farm

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Posted 20 October 2020 - 07:51 PM

I planted 3 acres of it 2 years ago this Thanksgiving day. Unfortunately it was doomed from the start since it rained 4 inches the night after I planted.
1st year did pretty good down here it grows like crazy in the fall,winter, and early spring you know when no drying weather available. It was so hot and humid all summer you couldn't even find any of it till a few weeks ago. I am going to sprig the whole field in spring with coastal. But I am not giving up on the alfalfa I plan to plant a few acres that I am clearing up to run goats on they loved the hay and should make excellent winter grazing

#4 vhaby

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 11:05 PM

Thanks Reede and JOR Farm. I ordered the 600 RR earlier this week. $391 per bag for seed and license, including shipping.

 

The original AlfaGraze, FD 2, was the variety we conducted our earlier research with when trying to learn its growth requirements on our Coastal Plain soils at TA&M-Overton. The first planting in established Coastal Bermudagrass survived through two, 3 yr studies with our efforts to keep it growing. The stand lasted another two years after that with no fertilizer program on it before we took it out. I hope the 600 RR seeded in clean tilled soil does equally well or better.



#5 vhaby

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Posted 15 November 2020 - 02:03 PM

I re-inoculated the pre-inoculated, coated Alfagraze 600RR and planted it into moist sandy loam soil the day after a 2" rain using a double-disk opener John Deere 8300 drill set to seed no deeper than one-half inch with a water-filled roller in tow to repack the soil. Attempted to put out 12.5 pounds of coated seed per acre and covered the field east and west and then north and south in an attempt to plant a total of 15 pounds of pure live seed per acre. Within about six days the first seedlings appeared and at 13 days after seeding, the first unifoliate leaves began to appear. Today, 16 days after seeding, a green sheen shows across most of the field and the stand is approaching the time that it needs the first treatment with Glyphosate to take out weeds and any non-RR alfalfa plants. This stand has received no rain since it was planted. Weather predictions a week out are usually promising but by the time that promised rainfall arrives it has fizzled to nothing. Good thing I took the gamble and planted when I did. La Nina definitely is in play...


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#6 vhaby

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Posted 22 November 2020 - 01:06 AM

First trifoliate leaves began showing earlier this week. From a distance, with having seeded N & S and E & W, the alfalfa acreage is showing a light green sheen indicating that a good stand has established. Still no rain on the new seeding, but it is predicted for this coming week. Gophers and moles are invading the site and am attempting to control them with aluminum phosphide pellets.



#7 vhaby

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 01:45 AM

An update on my new seeding of Alfagraze 600RR; sprayed 22 oz Glyphosate/ac about 1.5 months ago to take out cool season weeds and non Roundup Ready seedlings, if any. Two weeks ago I fertilized the alfalfa seedlings with 422 lb/ac of 9-24-29 from DAP, potash, and KMag plus 3.75 lb of boron per acre. A week ago, four inches of snow covered the alfalfa and it survived. With having seeded E & W and N & S much of the field has solid cover of alfalfa.


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#8 r82230

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 09:41 AM

Vincent, you are the pro on fertilizations IMHO, but I have to ask, why so much phos after planting and not some before (1/2) before planting?

 

Larry



#9 Vol

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 09:47 AM

I am not Dr.Haby, but if I were to guess it was likely due to his soil variety. He probably wanted to make sure the plants would have plenty of uptake before the amendments moved too deep.

 

Regards, Mike



#10 vhaby

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Posted 17 January 2021 - 10:27 AM

Larry and Mike, I appreciate your question and responses.

 

This field's soil test results from October sampling of the 6-inch depth were pH 6.6, P 42, K 66, Ca 714, Mg 48, and S 10. The P soil test critical level is 50 ppm to move from a medium level into the high bracket. By adding 100 lb of P2O5 I may have gone overboard a bit on the phosphorus application, but that's all the phosphate this acreage gets this season. There, in my opinion, was ample P in the soil for seedling growth and I wanted to continue P buildup in this Coastal Plain soil. By applying this level of phosphate, I expect to have raised the P soil test by at least 5 ppm and maybe as much as 8 ppm with soil pH being near 7.

 

The pH might be a bit low for alfalfa, but remember that by sampling in October and the pH being analyzed using a 2:1 water:soil suspension, the test result is salt affected compared to soil samples collected in late winter when soil salts have been leached out of the soil due to winter rainfall. A salt affected pH can be 0.5 points or more lower than the same soil sampled in late winter/spring/early summer. In my previous research career, soils sampled in spring always tested higher in pH than the same soil sampled in fall.

 

Vincent


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