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#21 JD3430

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Posted 23 July 2020 - 11:10 PM

I would have no problem with that.  I tear out concrete with my runty little 1835Bs.  I found that a pallet fork frame with 4 forks on works very well for that.  

I use rentals for concrete work all the time, but I mean extracting boulders buried in fields, sticking up maybe a foot?



#22 r82230

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 07:21 AM

I use rentals for concrete work all the time, but I mean extracting boulders buried in fields, sticking up maybe a foot?

 

I do what Gear mentions with my tractor mounted pallet forks, except I only have two forks.  Just put them together and dive in.  Not much dirt moved, just have to pick the time of year you do it.  I do mine in late fall or early spring, when ground is damper (more forgiving :cool:). 

 

My pallet forks are skid steer type mount BTW.

 

Larry



#23 Gearclash

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 07:47 AM

I use rentals for concrete work all the time, but I mean extracting boulders buried in fields, sticking up maybe a foot?

Yup, that is what I’m thinking of.  4 forks on a frame will have that out shortly.  Nice thing is you don’t have to pay for a fancy purpose specific tool that can’t do much else.  With 4 forks on, you can take a few bites of dirt out of the way as firm soil will stay on the forks long enough to pile it to one side.  

 

The key to making pallet forks work for this kind of stuff, and to not kill the forks or the machine using them, is to use the forks as a 2nd class lever when initially popping the rock or concrete loose. That means getting the forks as far as possible under the object, then using a lift and dump action.  It may take a few repetitions of that to get the stone or piece of concrete free of the soil, but it works.  I use this technique extensively for taking out concrete flat work with my 1835s and I’ve seen good solid 6” concrete that was 6 or 8 feet wide break from the force, and not at an existing crack.


  • JD3430 and stack em up like this

#24 stack em up

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 08:33 AM

Dug out many a rock with pallet forks. Also used a manure fork in a pinch. Best friend has a root grapple that seems to work as well.

#25 dvcochran

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 03:32 PM

I hear you on using forks for the bigger rocks & boulders but the OP is talking about small 3" rock. Hopefully the OP will respond again with more information. I wondered if they are moving larger gravel .



#26 r82230

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 05:16 PM

I hear you on using forks for the bigger rocks & boulders but the OP is talking about small 3" rock. Hopefully the OP will respond again with more information. I wondered if they are moving larger gravel .



How good are skid steers for digging up 2-3’ rocks?
 

 

I use rentals for concrete work all the time, but I mean extracting boulders buried in fields, sticking up maybe a foot?

 

Plus he mentions sticking up a foot above the ground.  Unless I'm reading wrong, he's talking about feet not inches.  But won't be the first time I'm wrong.  :huh: If it is, I'm sorry. 

 

Larry



#27 dvcochran

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Posted 24 July 2020 - 09:09 PM

How good are skid steers for digging up 2-3’ rocks?
 

 

 

Plus he mentions sticking up a foot above the ground.  Unless I'm reading wrong, he's talking about feet not inches.  But won't be the first time I'm wrong.  :huh: If it is, I'm sorry. 

 

Larry

You are correct sir; I went back and checked and it does say 2-3'. Forks sound much better now. ;)  I stand corrected.


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#28 paoutdoorsman

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Posted 28 July 2020 - 12:02 PM

I also buy and sell some machines so I have run a wide variety of machines. Currently have too much inventory, and not enough buyers. Have Case 450-3, 440-3, NH L160, NH 190 all at the farm at my disposal. Kinda nice..

 

Have you noticed a slow down in skid load sales PaMike?






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