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Nh68 repair is it worth it?


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#1 Aaroncboo

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 10:41 PM

I have a NH268 that I just rebuilt the whole plunger and feeder assembly. Runs beautifully. But I was in the market for a second hay rake just for a backup. I even put all new tines on my rake this spring.

So I was talking to the neighbor about a rake he had. A international 15 side dump, interestingly the same exact model I have. It had the gearbox rebuilt 5 years ago and used on 7 acres a year for two years. Then he decided that 75 was a good age to stop baling himself and hire it done.

Back to the original topic. He had a Nh68 that had all new knotters put on 4 years ago to the tune of around $1000. He sold me both rake and baler for $450, says if it's gone he won't be tempted to do hay himself anymore. But the baler needs new plunger rails. Idk if it's worth the time and effort to replace it. Wife seems to think I'm spending money on a baler that I don't need to given the expense of the repair to the 268. I'd kinda like to fix it for a backup and if I decide to sell it if will be at least a decent little baler. I'd have hard time selling a subpar piece of equipment but don't want to put money into it and not be able to get it back at the end. Kind of a pro vs Con deal. What do you fellas think?

#2 Snow Farmer

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 11:03 PM

I guess it depends on how much it will cost to bring it up to par, of course.

I always thought it was good idea to have spare machines for making hay, if they are affordable and you have the space to store them.



#3 8350HiTech

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 05:57 AM

If it looks half decent, absolutely fix it as it will be mostly a time issue and not so much cost. Even if it only looks okay you’re still ahead of the game to make it functional.
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#4 r82230

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 06:23 AM

I guess it depends on how much it will cost to bring it up to par, of course.

I always thought it was good idea to have spare machines for making hay, if they are affordable and you have the space to store them.

 

 

 

If it looks half decent, absolutely fix it as it will be mostly a time issue and not so much cost. Even if it only looks okay you’re still ahead of the game to make it functional.

 

+2, price is right.

 

Larry


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#5 DSLinc1017

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 09:17 AM

It’s a win win!

#6 Aaroncboo

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 11:21 AM

I would imagine it would be easier than the 268 was. Maybe cheaper?

#7 bool

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 03:50 PM

It's worth the repair and you are the man to do it.

 

Roger



#8 rankrank1

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 08:53 PM

Are you positive it needs plunger rails as in the metal rails?  A New Holland 68 has wood glides for bearings on the plunger.  My guess is that wood is worn away. and not the metal rails  New Holland may still offer the wood glides but I imagine they are quite pricey if they do.  What I would do is make my own wood glide bearings for basically free from either sawmill lumber or go skid scavenging and find some good oak from a skid and make the wood glide bearings for nearly free.  Additionally the rails inside the machine are adjustable to compensate as the wood wears.

 

Yes I would fix the NH68 baler myself and keep it for a back-up machine.  It will easily pay for itself the first time you have a breakdown with the other machine and hay is on the ground and the rain is on the way.  Heck sounds like you got the baler for nearly free to me.  I would not take it in to a dealer and pay shop rates to fix though.

 

Use the 268 as your primary machine.  Use the 68 as the back-up.  If I am not mistaken a 268 will have several steel rollers on the plunger with ball bearings in each roller instead of the wood glide slides liike the NH 68 has.  Certainly a sligthly better system until you need to begin replacing those bearing type rollers.  They are about $40 bucks each and there are several on the plunger so it can add up very fast.  Conversely, the wood on the 68 can be made for nearly free and it will last a very long time if done correctly.  If the NH68 is going to sit outside a lot then do oil the wood and slides liberally.  The wood can swell if out in the weather making it hard to spin over as it will not glide freely in the track when swollen.

 

Capacity wise I would say there is not a huge difference between the 2 machines or at least not enough to worry about but if I just had to give an edge then I would give it to the 268.  


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#9 Aaroncboo

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 09:04 PM

I'm not 100% on the wood but if I have it out I might as well. The steel rails on both sides are loose. The bolts are broken. The pickup side looks like a piece of flat stock and the other one is angle iron. So I'd pull the plunger out and get all the rust out and rebolt the rails. Then with new wood it should be as easy as adjusting the clearance. Hopefully... Always sounds easy.

#10 rankrank1

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 09:46 PM

Do some google searching there is a site you can find an operator's manual for a NH68 or it may be a super 68 manual for free.  I found it when I bought a NH super 68 baler a while back.  The manual is interchangable between either model.  The Super 68 simply has an extra shaft that comes off the gear box the will raise or lower feeder tine pick up assembly by pulling a trip rope.  Not a needed feature for me at all.  Otherwise rest of baler is all the same.

 

The full parts list of detailed picture schematic is available for free viewing at AGCO site or alternatively a site like Messick's.

 

That all said you do have the right idea on your thoughts....






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