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JD 530 loose twine


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#1 Havoc

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 06:14 AM

Hello,

 

I have a new to me JD 530 round baler with a single twine arm that I am trying to put into service.  All of the belts are brand new and are installed as per the manual.  This is my first time using a round baler so everything is new to me.  Anyway, started making bales last night and there is one issue I am not able to figure out.  The photo shows a typical bale and most of my bales have a section of loose twine on the left side of the bale.  When I say left side, I mean the side behind the twine arm when the twine arm is in its home position (right side in the photo). Hope this makes sense.  I got out of the tractor and watched the tying process a few times and the twine arm appears to move at a consistent speed although hard to tell with the hay dust.  I checked the twine arm gears and they seem tight and are meshing well.  I went ahead and finished baling but I would like to try and resolve this issue for my next baling adventure.  I will get the baler back in the shop this weekend and take a closer look at the twine arm and gears.  Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated.

 

Thanks for your time, John.

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#2 Tx Jim

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 06:54 AM

Congratulation on making a level bale of hay.   Check to be sure a hay compression rod on LH side of baler isn't bent up blocking good twine spacing.

 

With tail gate locked closed,hydraulically raise tension arm to the point where 3+ appears in bale size window on RH side of baler. With engine operating,pto engaged pull rope on baler RH side to engage twine arm mechanism then watch twine arm for any irregularities in travel across baler then back to home position  .



#3 Texasmark

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 07:31 AM

Congratulation on making a level bale of hay.   Check to be sure a hay compression rod on LH side of baler isn't bent up blocking good twine spacing.

 

With tail gate locked closed,hydraulically raise tension arm to the point where 3+ appears in bale size window on RH side of baler. With engine operating,pto engaged pull rope on baler RH side to engage twine arm mechanism then watch twine arm for any irregularities in travel across baler then back to home position  .

Jim, doesn't the 530 also have the spring loaded flat plate tensioner that forces the bale to "pull" the twine out of the roll rather than it "floating" out.  Don't they develop a grove from usage that allows the twine to move up in the grove lessening the tension and possibly aiding this problem?



#4 Tx Jim

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 07:34 AM

Mark

Yes you're correct. The twine tension plates have been known to get a groove worn in them therefore not putting much tension on the twine while it's being applied to the bale.



#5 Edd in KY

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 11:40 AM

I had that problem when I was learning to use a round baler (totally different brand baler). My neighbor who had be round baling for 30 years said...."you need more tension on the twine so the baler has to drag it out of the box". I cleaned the dirt and chaff out of the tension plates, adjusted the bolts and springs...problem solved. seemed too simple, but it worked and also made cutting the twine much easier.



#6 Havoc

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 09:10 PM

Congratulation on making a level bale of hay.   Check to be sure a hay compression rod on LH side of baler isn't bent up blocking good twine spacing.

 

With tail gate locked closed,hydraulically raise tension arm to the point where 3+ appears in bale size window on RH side of baler. With engine operating,pto engaged pull rope on baler RH side to engage twine arm mechanism then watch twine arm for any irregularities in travel across baler then back to home position  .

Thanks Tx Jim.  The hay compression rod appears to be in the right position but I will take a closer look.  I do have a manual for this baler and I have performed the manual twine arm procedure a few times prior to baling but now I will do it again when I get it back in the shop and watch it closely for irregular movement.



#7 Havoc

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 09:16 PM

Jim, doesn't the 530 also have the spring loaded flat plate tensioner that forces the bale to "pull" the twine out of the roll rather than it "floating" out.  Don't they develop a grove from usage that allows the twine to move up in the grove lessening the tension and possibly aiding this problem?

Thanks Texasmark and Edd in KY.  I did clean all of the crud out from behind the tension plates and I did not see any grooves in the plates but I agree, the twine does seem to pull out with very little effort.  Another thing that will be checked once it is in the shop.



#8 Tx Jim

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 06:54 AM

Later model JD rd balers such as my 467 has thumb nut adjustable twine tensioner in lieu of only spring tension. 435/535 rd balers had bolt/nut adjustable twine tensioners.  It is surprising that the twine tensioner on a 530 doesn't have a groove worn in it.



#9 Havoc

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 10:28 PM

I will take a closer look for grooves on the tensioner after I get the bales stacked.  I did notice a few fairly deep grooves on the twine entry end of the twine arm.



#10 Havoc

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 11:48 AM

So, upon a closer look, there indeed was a groove in the twine arm tension plate and the twine arm itself.  After a little welding and grinding, these were fixed.  Now the tension plate coming out of the twine box has a plate and two pins but only one of the pins had a spring on it. I am not sure if each pin needs a spring or not but I found and installed a second closely matching spring anyway.  The twine is now much harder to pull out of the twine arm and I am afraid it may too tight to be pulled out by the twine catching on the bale.  My book does not give me a value (lbs of force) to pull twine from the twine arm. 

 

First question.  Should I have two springs installed on the twine box tension plate?

Second question.  Any guidance on the correct amount of force that should be required to pull the twine from the twine arm?

 

Thanks for your time, John.



#11 r82230

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 12:07 PM

Your second question might be answered in your baler's manual (amount of force needed to pull twine).

 

The first question, you'll have to wait for Jim, he can access parts manual much faster than this old fart.  :cool:

 

Larry



#12 Tx Jim

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 12:32 PM

One spring is shown. I think your balers twine tension will be much better with no grooves in tension plates. I think tension being too tight won't be a problem if you don't slam on the brakes when yellow light illuminates solid

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#13 Tx Jim

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 12:36 PM

 

The first question, you'll have to wait for Jim, he can access parts manual much faster than this old fart.  :cool:

 

Larry

Larry 

I might be older than you. I'll be 76 if I live until my next BD in October. I'd venture to guess I've had many,many more hrs of experience looking up JD parts than you.



#14 r82230

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 12:40 PM

Larry 

I might be older than you. I'll be 76 if I live until my next BD in October. I'd venture to guess I've had many,many more hrs of experience looking up JD parts than you.

  Jim,

 

I wasn't calling you an old fart, I was calling myself one.  :o   The looking up parts was supposed to be taken as a complement, sorry if you didn't.

 

Larry



#15 Tx Jim

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 01:24 PM

Larry

WHOA you misunderstood me or I didn't state it correctly. 

I knew you were referring to yourself as an "old fart" not MYSELF. I thought I was just stating that more than likely I'm older than you.

Thank you for the complement. I've been regularly looking up JD parts for 55 yrs.

Jim



#16 Havoc

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Posted 18 July 2020 - 04:24 PM

Thanks fellas.  I will pull one spring out and put it back how I found it.  It will be a few weeks before I can give the baler another test drive.



#17 Havoc

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 06:13 PM

Well I was finally able to try and bale some hay.  About two minutes after I started making the first bale, a down pour hit but I finished the bale anyway.  It is very wet but I will just put it off by itself.  Anyway, before I started the bale, I increased the bale density, increased bale size a little and I had already adjusted the little twine guide rods under the baler that keep the twine from getting to close to the edge of the bale.  I had also fixed both twine tension plates. 

 

Everything seemed to go ok but when I dumped the bale I noticed it had that same loose twine section on the left side of the bale.  The rest of the twine wraps were very snug on the bale and appeared to be just fine.  Most were spaced about 3" apart but on the loose twine section, the few wraps in that section were 5" to 6" apart.  I have cycled the twine arm a few times and checked for slop in the gears and hydraulic cylinder linkage as the arm is moving across but all seems well. I am baffled.

 

The weather was good today and should be good tomorrow as well and hopefully I can make more bales and see if I can see anything that make be causing this issue.

 

Thanks, John.



#18 Tx Jim

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 06:39 AM

Has twine arm pivot area been regularly lubricated?



#19 Havoc

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 07:56 AM

When I had the twine arm off in order to weld up the twine groove, the twine arm pivot shaft looked well lubricated with grease.  I did not check the shaft for the mating gear but I did grease it.  I will take a second look at the other gear pivot shaft and make sure it moves freely.  That zerk is a little harder to get to so it may have been lacking grease from the previous owner.  Thanks Tx Jim.



#20 Havoc

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 01:11 PM

Twine arm mechanism looks good.  Everything lubricated well and pivot points do not have any slop. 

 

While a bale was tying and I was right under the baler watching, I noticed that the twine did a little jump as it was being pulled into the bale right between the 2nd and 3rd belt.  When the bale was dumped, sure enough, the twine was cut.  This may be why I have that loose section of twine on some bales.  I checked a few other bales and the twine was cut as well.  Something may be snagging and cutting the twine at that point every once in a while. I will have to take a look.

 

Also, how do you know if the twine guide rods are adjusted right.  How close should the end of the twine arm pass by them?  My twine still seems really close to the edge but if I move the guide in much more, the twine arm will hit them.






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