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Stumbled onto something with fertilizer


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#21 JD3430

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Posted 02 July 2020 - 08:28 AM

Am I reading that correctly, 1" is applying over 800# of N and 900# of K?  And it's free?

 

And the second table is doubled but still 1" (typo?, should it be 2"?).

 

Larry

It is free. Even the delivery is free. They can’t get rid of it fast enough.

Its not a perfect answer, nothing is. 

 

One other thing I have noticed is it keeps the top of the ground more moist when it’s dry and it seems to attract more earth worms. I would think this might have an affect of breaking up compacted soil to some extent.
 

I probably put one large Hagedorn spreader heaped up pretty good per 3/4-1 acre. Can’t imagine there’s more than 15 tons per acre.

75tons/acre would be 5” thick and kill everything. 

Corn farmers put down a LOT of it. I’d guess they’re doing 3-4” thick based on visual observation.

 

In the first picture below, look under the tractor & spreader. That’s about how thick it normally gets applied 

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#22 dvcochran

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 11:57 AM

It wasn’t spread on frozen ground.

 

There was no run off.

 

It happened on 2 smaller fields of the 15 or so fields I do. 

 

This is the first time I spread it >1” thick, due to over-delivery of the product and it averaged 1.5”. 
 

I don’t do it every year (5 of last 7 years)
 

My normal application is 1”

 

Although it doesn’t have the nitrogen of chemical fertilizers, it does have organic and microbial benefits chemical fertilizers do not have. 

Just curious; is this the by-product from a WWTP? We did it on/off for several years when it was free. It is not any more.

It has to be spread with an auger/slinger truck because it is moist and 'chunky' sometimes. I go over the fields with a chain harrow after it is spread. Sometimes the stuff is so rich is will burn if not harrowed and at least some moisture. If it is really hot where there is little to no morning/evening condensation it will burn. Ours is more grey than black though. 

I never did it without a soil sample first. 

 

Anybody else out there using WWTP by-product?



#23 JD3430

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Posted 05 July 2020 - 05:19 PM

Just curious; is this the by-product from a WWTP? We did it on/off for several years when it was free. It is not any more.

It has to be spread with an auger/slinger truck because it is moist and 'chunky' sometimes. I go over the fields with a chain harrow after it is spread. Sometimes the stuff is so rich is will burn if not harrowed and at least some moisture. If it is really hot where there is little to no morning/evening condensation it will burn. Ours is more grey than black though. 

I never did it without a soil sample first. 

 

Anybody else out there using WWTP by-product?

 

WWTP meaning "Waste water Treatment Plant"? 

No, it is not. I wont use that stuff. Ever. 

 

Mushroom compost is decayed hay, water, lime, poultry litter, horse manure, topsoil and possibly some sawdust. Different companies make their own blends, each unique to their beliefs on whats best.



#24 dvcochran

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 05:02 PM

WWTP meaning "Waste water Treatment Plant"? 

No, it is not. I wont use that stuff. Ever. 

 

Mushroom compost is decayed hay, water, lime, poultry litter, horse manure, topsoil and possibly some sawdust. Different companies make their own blends, each unique to their beliefs on whats best.

You have to get past where it came from and understand what it is. The process uses ag lime, different wood products coarser than sawdust, UV light and depending on saliency distillers grain. The water used is dechlorinated before use so it is cleaner than tap water. The solids come out first and fully; that is anything from automobiles (I have seen this), to bodies/parts ( I have seen this) to just what you expect. They have to come out so the liquid can pass through the various types of particle filtration used, which goes down to as low as 1 micron. Average pH starts at around <6 and comes out at 12+ from the processing. This is the problem with using it sometimes as it is too hot if you are not very careful. I little dab will truly do it.

Slake has little to no odor since there is no chlorine and smells closer to lime than anything I can describe. 

 

You have no problem using poultry litter (an animal that truly eats is own feces) and horse manure. Assuming neither is treated/processed before using it is not much of a leap seeing that using slake us safer and requires less. IMHO.



#25 JD3430

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 09:08 PM

You have to get past where it came from and understand what it is. The process uses ag lime, different wood products coarser than sawdust, UV light and depending on saliency distillers grain. The water used is dechlorinated before use so it is cleaner than tap water. The solids come out first and fully; that is anything from automobiles (I have seen this), to bodies/parts ( I have seen this) to just what you expect. They have to come out so the liquid can pass through the various types of particle filtration used, which goes down to as low as 1 micron. Average pH starts at around <6 and comes out at 12+ from the processing. This is the problem with using it sometimes as it is too hot if you are not very careful. I little dab will truly do it.

Slake has little to no odor since there is no chlorine and smells closer to lime than anything I can describe. 

 

You have no problem using poultry litter (an animal that truly eats is own feces) and horse manure. Assuming neither is treated/processed before using it is not much of a leap seeing that using slake us safer and requires less. IMHO.

Oh I know what it is.

I don’t know if WWTP is even allowed in my area. 
Thought never crossed my mind to use it. Too gross. 



#26 slowzuki

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Posted 06 July 2020 - 09:15 PM

It’s not a gross issue usually more the contamination issue. Like wood ash you can end up with stuff on your land like heavy metals that are hard to remove.




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