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Trusses for New Hay Barn


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#1 RockyHill

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 10:06 AM

Need thoughts on steel vs wood trusses for hay barn.  Will be built with wood posts in ground.  Have used wood trusses in other barns.  Know will need to have carpenter's input but I value all the knowledge Hay Talk folks have.

 

Thanks,

Shelia



#2 r82230

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 12:44 PM

Wood posts, what is the rational for steel trusses, distance?  Seems steel would be more $$$. 

 

Are you putting wood (OSB) then steel roof? If so, seems wood (post) fastening to wood (trusses) fastening to wood underlayment (OSB) would be simplest fastening.

 

Thing to remember about steel expands/contracts around 1/8" every 16 or 20', with a temperature change of around 80 degrees.  IDR the exact percentages but I think I'm in the ball park.  Wood doesn't seem to have this feature.

 

Now, it there are other reasons for steel (height considerations or need for truss strength) then you might be able to live with the expansion/contraction of steel.

 

Might be short on my two cents worth.   :cool:

 

Larry



#3 RockyHill

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 01:34 PM

Steel are about twice the cost of wood but use about half as many so looking like that would equal out. 

 

I don't speak the language well  :)  but the steel fasten directly to the posts, don't have to have a header running the length of the barn.  Steel have a bracket for the purlins to fit in and be fastened to instead of measure, fit, secure on wood.  Wondering if labor would be less along with some less lumber for the header.

 

Our roofs don't have OSB; the enclosed barns have the foil backed bubble insulation but the open hay barn doesn't have anything but trusses/purlins/metal roof.

 

Larry, we'll work on your two cents worth more as time goes on. :cool:

 

Shelia


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#4 r82230

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 02:02 PM

I like the OSB for a couple or reasons, it's much quieter during a rain storm and I don't have the 'sweating' (read water off the underside). 

 

If here is savings, because of spacing, would there be cost to adding more 2 x 4's (or would you use 2 x 6's) underneath the steel roof (with or with out OSB).  My trusses are on 4' centers, so I'm guessing you are looking at 8' (or more) on center. 

 

With all things being equal cost/labor wise.  Advantage to steel, less places for birds to land, could be a deciding factor.  Maybe they are not a problem in YOUR neck of woods.  :P

 

Larry

 

PS wood advantage in my case, easier for me to fasten electric wire/lights.  :rolleyes:


Edited by r82230, 24 June 2020 - 02:04 PM.

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#5 leeave96

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 06:44 PM

When we built our barn last year, we used engineered trusses.  One of the questions I asked was - we know what the vertical load down is going to be, but what about when the doors are open and a huge wind blows in and tries to inflate the barn.  What is the upward load?  They redesigned the gable end trusses based on my question.  We have hurricane ties holding the trusses down.

 

We over built our barn, but IMHO, it gets really windy here.  Our posts are in the ground 4 ft with a concrete pad under them.  Crusher run back fill.  Roof eves are 2ft over hang on the sides and 1 ft on the front and rear.  Posts are 6x6 and are old type CCA with a higher precentage of treatment.  I can't remember if it is .80 or .95, but it was not expensive to add the additional treatment since we had to special order the posts anyway.  CCA is still allowed in agricultural buildings.  Our roof is 5/8 - 5 ply - plywood.  When the screw goes through, I wanted plenty of plies holding it in.  Metal roof w/gutters.  Vented soffits all the way around and a ridge vent.  Doors wide and tall enough to easily drive a loaded kicker wagon through.  Doors on both ends and one on the side.  We also put a small clear plastic window along the length of each side for some ambient light.  At some point we are going to do an asphault floor.  We built the barn bigger than planned, but easily fill it.  It is tall enough (16ft) that we can add lean to's later.  We used a waistcoat (sp?) around the perimeter and left an exposed treated 2x6 along the bottom perimeter so a weed eater string wouldn't tear up the metal.  White barn, green waistcoat and green roof - it is a beautiful building IMHO.  Local contractor built it.  I tried and tried to get Morton to give me a quote and warranty details (read fine print), for whatever reason, they wouldn't, they never took us serious.  After the barn was built, I contacted them to let it be know that we in fact built a barn.  The guy was shocked IMHO.  I then told him to give me a quote for basically an identical barn, a second barn on the farm - I wanted to know how much an equivalent Mortan building would cost.  The quote was substantially higher than the local contractor and materials.

 

Good luck with the barn and ping me if you have any questions, I'll tell you what I think I know...

 

Bill


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#6 somedevildawg

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 07:26 PM

Sheila are you talking about the angle iron steel trusses that I see advertised? 40-50’ clear span? Have attachments to install on to 6x6” posts?

#7 somedevildawg

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 07:32 PM

I bought a Morton building, I think it’s like 40x60....(I know I should know that :( ) haven’t went and picked it up yet.....damn time flies, that’s been 6 months ago :o they appear to be nice buildings, apparently they have more business than they can handle....

#8 somedevildawg

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 07:39 PM

Bill, have you posted pics of that barn before? I don’t remember, but nothing unusual about that, but it sounds interesting and nice. Btw, its wainscot....and I bet it’s purty
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#9 RockyHill

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 08:24 PM

This shows the kind of trusses.  Looks like should be simple to build.  Will have lean to on one side.  We don't use gutters, have tile/gravel drainage along each side.  Will use our geotextile fabric/10 mil plastic/crushed rock floor.

 

barn-big.jpg


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#10 somedevildawg

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 08:59 PM

Ya, I like those trusses....let us know how they work out if you use them, purty economical, 10’ centers works out good too....

#11 Palmettokat

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 09:03 PM

Sheila, I looked in some detail at barn in coastal South Carolina and we had to meet something about 125 mph rated roofs. Well not sure since ag building had to meet it but the code person strongly recommended it. Ran into some metal trusses from Florida and maybe Georgia and South Carolina that were not engineered, so you had no real idea of their capacity.  If memory is correct the local builders mostly if not all used wood trusses. Those using the metal were I think all from out of town. The price difference was not much. 

There was also argument in the style of the metal whether angle iron was better and moisture would not be caught in it or if tubing was better due to strength to weight. 

Would not want to use any truss there was not engineered specs on it. 


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#12 leeave96

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 09:22 PM

Bill, have you posted pics of that barn before? I don’t remember, but nothing unusual about that, but it sounds interesting and nice. Btw, its wainscot....and I bet it’s purty

A few pics of our barn...

Attached File  8E7FE78E-4097-42BD-A3C6-764C87B5A2B0.jpeg   311.76KB   0 downloads

Attached File  FAD391ED-6EB2-42A1-80E6-86DF5000CBF5.jpeg   153.7KB   0 downloads
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#13 somedevildawg

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Posted 24 June 2020 - 09:25 PM

Wow, really nice.... congrats!

#14 JD3430

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 04:25 AM

This shows the kind of trusses.  Looks like should be simple to build.  Will have lean to on one side.  We don't use gutters, have tile/gravel drainage along each side.  Will use our geotextile fabric/10 mil plastic/crushed rock floor.

 

barn-big.jpg

I have those trusses in a building built in 1983. 
Still holding up well.

Goes up real easy and the labor & dangerous task of standing up the wood trusses then bracing them is avoided. 


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#15 slowzuki

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 05:34 AM

Houle used to sell those style steel trusses here, easy to erect, had tabs for purlins. Good reputation.
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#16 RockyHill

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 07:27 AM

I have those trusses in a building built in 1983. 
Still holding up well.

Goes up real easy and the labor & dangerous task of standing up the wood trusses then bracing them is avoided. 

 

Thanks.  Any suggestions on the process?  

 

Shelia



#17 r82230

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 11:56 AM

I bought a Morton building, I think it’s like 40x60....(I know I should know that :( ) haven’t went and picked it up yet.....damn time flies, that’s been 6 months ago :o

 

Dawg, I'll help you out, send me your ID, I'll "store" your building for you.  ;)  I will even check the 'snow load', just in case we have a reverse climate change.  :rolleyes:   And I'll even do it on the 'cheap' side, I'm thinking a couple of pecan pies every couple months would be mighty fair.  :D  :lol:  :D  :lol:

 

Larry


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#18 r82230

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Posted 25 June 2020 - 04:04 PM

Sheila,

 

I like the steel trusses with the open end, a lot of head room.  Even in my enclosed building there would be a benefit of more clearance. I've only hit one of my trusses so far at 20'.  :o  I'm thinking not only higher but less 'targets' too.  ;)

 

Larry


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#19 Ranger518

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Posted 26 June 2020 - 09:43 PM

I have used both wood trusses when I built my shop and metal trusses when I built my hay barn both on 10’ centers and both pole barn style with wood post and purlins. I like the steel trusses much better as they are easer and faster to install plus you get more ceiling space.
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#20 JD3430

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 06:57 PM

Steel are about twice the cost of wood but use about half as many so looking like that would equal out. 

 

I don't speak the language well  :)  but the steel fasten directly to the posts, don't have to have a header running the length of the barn.  Steel have a bracket for the purlins to fit in and be fastened to instead of measure, fit, secure on wood.  Wondering if labor would be less along with some less lumber for the header.

 

Our roofs don't have OSB; the enclosed barns have the foil backed bubble insulation but the open hay barn doesn't have anything but trusses/purlins/metal roof.

 

Larry, we'll work on your two cents worth more as time goes on. :cool:

 

Shelia

 

Yes theres less labor and its a safer job than standing up trusses. I think I can build one of those with just one helper and a Genie lift. The one Im in now has your typical painted steel roof. I like the way they go together. More idiot proof. 


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