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High tensile electric fence


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#1 CowboyRam

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 03:45 PM

I am planning building a five wire electric fence.  I am not sure how far to space my all my line post.  I have searched the internet and it seems that the spacing is all over the place, from 20' to 90'.  I am thinking of spacing my post at 30'.  

 

What's your thoughts.  

 



#2 stack em up

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 04:24 PM

I space all my hi tensile posts at 30’. It costs more than wider spacing but there is no need for stays that way and allows for more uneven terrain and still keep an even distance between the ground and bottom wire. I’ve planted literally hundreds of posts at 30’ for thousands of feet of fence and never been less than happy with it. Good luck!
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#3 Farmerbrown2

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 06:40 PM

If you’re realitively flat and want to save a few bucks poly stays work great. I haven’t had cattle in years but deer sometimes break a post for me. I had to replace three posts this spring two of them right next to each other. I keep the fence up to keep the honest crooks out. Most of my fence has been up over thirty years it’s amazing how well it holds up. Pay the extra for quality wire it’s not all created equal.

#4 CowboyRam

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 06:42 PM

My plan is to make the wires from the bottom up at 8", 6", 8" 10", 10" with a total height of 42 " 
I am going to make the second line from the bottom and the second line from the top a ground line, and the other lines hot.  



#5 Farmerbrown2

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 07:46 PM

I always made the bottom ground second one hot so the cattle would maintain the fence for me . But you have a complete different environment then I do .
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#6 CowboyRam

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 08:49 PM

I always made the bottom ground second one hot so the cattle would maintain the fence for me . But you have a complete different environment then I do .

Actually I typed that wrong, I had planned on making the bottom one the ground, and the next two lines up hot, and the top wire hot.  



#7 r82230

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 09:04 PM

Some places I got 3 wires, some places 2 wires and a few places 1 wire.  They are all hot.  I place posts anywhere from 15' (on even terrain) to 50'-70' (level terrain), I let the wire 'tell' me what's needed. Single wire is across marsh areas, so I know cows have a pretty good grounding source.  ;)

 

Perhaps I'm in a 'wetter' area so I don't run a ground wire at all.  But I do have 4 or 5 ground stakes (10' in length) from 4' to 6' apart on both fencers.    One fencer's grounding rods are on the drip line of a pole barn.  The other one I will run a garden hose on for 6-10 hours once in while, IF I get into drought conditions.

 

Larry


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#8 CowboyRam

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Posted 21 June 2020 - 09:51 PM

Some places I got 3 wires, some places 2 wires and a few places 1 wire.  They are all hot.  I place posts anywhere from 15' (on even terrain) to 50'-70' (level terrain), I let the wire 'tell' me what's needed. Single wire is across marsh areas, so I know cows have a pretty good grounding source.  ;)

 

Perhaps I'm in a 'wetter' area so I don't run a ground wire at all.  But I do have 4 or 5 ground stakes (10' in length) from 4' to 6' apart on both fencers.    One fencer's grounding rods are on the drip line of a pole barn.  The other one I will run a garden hose on for 6-10 hours once in while, IF I get into drought conditions.

 

Larry

The summers get pretty dry here.  Although most years the cows should be out on pasture during the summer; this pasture should only get used in the spring, and fall before I turn the cows out on the alfalfa field.  I plan in putting in three eight foot ground rods.  



#9 stack em up

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Posted 27 June 2020 - 10:39 PM

A few things I’ve learned over the years building hi-tensile.

1. For every joule of output, it’s best to have 4 feet of ground rod.

2. Bigger isn’t always better in energizers. Size appropriately for the length of fence and what you’re trying to keep in. I’ve run 30 miles of fence on 6 joules for cows but also had a guy that had llamas. We seriously needed 24 joules for about a 4 acre dry lot. Seriously. That sumbitch snaps when you touch it too!

3. Don’t be like me and be cheap on spinning jenny’s. If you’re building a 5 strand fence, buy 5 jennys. It saves lots of headaches and trips across the pasture.

4. Make sure when you add your fin tube insulators, add a couple extra than you have fence posts. You’ll be glad you did, cuz somehow they disappear and I’m not sure how. I think it’s like socks in the clothes dryer.

5. Don’t waste your time with twitch sticks on h-braces. Use a Kiwi strainer and you can snug them up a lot easier from year to year.

6. Make sure the wire you get is Max 10 from US Steel. Kencove has some stuff that’s a bit cheaper that looks appealing but when a branch falls on it it snaps, and in turn pisses you off.

7. Buy a 50’ roll of wraparound insulator from Powerflex Fence. Sometimes you need a wraparound that’s a bit longer than the standard length of 10”

8. Take your time driving the posts. In 50 years no one is gonna remember how fast you built that fence but they will know you did it right and made it straight.

9. This is a long term investment. The first hi-tensile dad put in 30 years ago is still standing strong. The crap posts he used at the time have long since rotted off but the wire is strong as the day we stretched it. (Without all the cool gadgets like a hydraulic post pounder and spinning Jenny. Just Dad and I and a hand post hole digger)
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#10 CowboyRam

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 12:04 AM

A few things I’ve learned over the years building hi-tensile.

1. For every joule of output, it’s best to have 4 feet of ground rod.

2. Bigger isn’t always better in energizers. Size appropriately for the length of fence and what you’re trying to keep in. I’ve run 30 miles of fence on 6 joules for cows but also had a guy that had llamas. We seriously needed 24 joules for about a 4 acre dry lot. Seriously. That sumbitch snaps when you touch it too!

3. Don’t be like me and be cheap on spinning jenny’s. If you’re building a 5 strand fence, buy 5 jennys. It saves lots of headaches and trips across the pasture.

4. Make sure when you add your fin tube insulators, add a couple extra than you have fence posts. You’ll be glad you did, cuz somehow they disappear and I’m not sure how. I think it’s like socks in the clothes dryer.

5. Don’t waste your time with twitch sticks on h-braces. Use a Kiwi strainer and you can snug them up a lot easier from year to year.

6. Make sure the wire you get is Max 10 from US Steel. Kencove has some stuff that’s a bit cheaper that looks appealing but when a branch falls on it it snaps, and in turn pisses you off.

7. Buy a 50’ roll of wraparound insulator from Powerflex Fence. Sometimes you need a wraparound that’s a bit longer than the standard length of 10”

8. Take your time driving the posts. In 50 years no one is gonna remember how fast you built that fence but they will know you did it right and made it straight.

9. This is a long term investment. The first hi-tensile dad put in 30 years ago is still standing strong. The crap posts he used at the time have long since rotted off but the wire is strong as the day we stretched it. (Without all the cool gadgets like a hydraulic post pounder and spinning Jenny. Just Dad and I and a hand post hole digger)

 

I'm going to put in three 8' ground rods.  My wire is wire from Oklahoma steel, in fact by the time I figured in the shipping, it was cheaper to buy from my local lumber yard than Kencove.  Besides I don't have to worry about trees where this fence is going.  

 

I only going to use a single spinning jenny, I only have about 1800 feet of fence to put in; I guess I will get my exercise.  

 

I plan on using railroad ties for my corner and H braces, and my line post will be t-post.  

 

I bought a bit to put on my hammer drill to drive the the ground rods.  Dad thought we could we could use the post ponder to drive the ground rod, but I think we would just bend the rod.  

 

Thanks for the info.  



#11 r82230

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 07:32 AM

Here water is a lot like grease.  Where I plan on driving ground rods, I soak the area first. 55 gallon drum, 5 gal bucket (both with small holes in them or small stiffen hose) or slowly running water hose.  With the ground saturated the rod drives much easier.  Might have to start a day or so before, but it really seems to help. Unless I'm doing this in a wet spring, then nature has helped me out.  ;)

 

Larry


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#12 BWfarms

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 08:19 PM

I use t posts as little as possible with an electric fence, they are a pain to find shorts. I will only use them when I can't get a tractor in there to pound a wood post. I prefer wood posts spaced 30-40'. I have spots where span is 60-80' and no stays and some where I put a stay. Depends on the cow's natural flight, along trees not a problem but next to an open area I like stays just to keep a step through from happening.

All spacings depends on the terrain but I wouldn't be afraid of 30-40 as long as you are using 12 gauge and springs to set tension to allow give when a deer hits. The purpose is to keep the cows in and the wildlife to pass through.
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#13 CowboyRam

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 08:30 PM

I use t posts as little as possible with an electric fence, they are a pain to find shorts. I will only use them when I can't get a tractor in there to pound a wood post. I prefer wood posts spaced 30-40'. I have spots where span is 60-80' and no stays and some where I put a stay. Depends on the cow's natural flight, along trees not a problem but next to an open area I like stays just to keep a step through from happening.

All spacings depends on the terrain but I wouldn't be afraid of 30-40 as long as you are using 12 gauge and springs to set tension to allow give when a deer hits. The purpose is to keep the cows in and the wildlife to pass through.

Do you put springs on every strand? 



#14 BWfarms

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Posted 28 June 2020 - 08:45 PM

Do you put springs on every strand?

Yes and I stagger their position on the line so they don't hook should an animal run through. I do sections; imagine a big square, a set for each line if long or 2 lines with a corner if short. If a line has a bunch of turns or elevation changes the more frequent I make a new section. Helps maintain the integrity of the fence.
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#15 Supa Dexta

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 06:19 AM

8-10 paces, just a good walk pace  by a 6 ft man. , not a long stride.

 

(pick a number and repeat)


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