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Wool market


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#1 Cult45

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 09:12 AM

Anybody have their finger on the market in the midwest to upper South?



#2 Hayjosh

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 10:48 AM

my wife does...she's an avid spinner, knitter, and weaver.


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#3 carcajou

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Posted 29 December 2019 - 12:42 PM

Not sure about the US market but our market prices are down from last year.  Seems China doesn't like us after the Huawei  BS.



#4 Cult45

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Posted 01 January 2020 - 09:45 AM

my wife does...she's an avid spinner, knitter, and weaver.

Does she buy her raw product from a local feed store type co-op?



#5 Hayjosh

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Posted 01 January 2020 - 12:02 PM

Does she buy her raw product from a local feed store type co-op?

 

This is all her answer:

 

She gets hers from fiber festivals, purchasing directly from producers raising fiber breeds, which is something spinners and knitters are pretty picky about. She is paying up to $20/lb for good quality fleece.

 

She says she doesn't even know what happens to the wool from meat breeds because most of the processing plants have closed, and the cost to shear the sheep is more than the value of the wool, especially since meat breed fiber is not very desirable to fiber crafters. It gets gathered up by a collective and then disappears somewhere.

 

Unless people are processing the fiber and dying it themselves-which she will do--most of the dyed fiber is coming from China. She speculated that the wool from the meat breeds might be making its way to China to get processed and then sold back to the US, especially in light of the closure of fiber processing plants.

 

If you are wanting to find a market or outlet for your wool or get better answers, go to the Ravelry website. It's a social network for anybody in the fiber crafting hobby or business and has a membership of 8 million users.



#6 stack em up

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Posted 01 January 2020 - 10:51 PM

Hayjosh is right, costs us more to shear a ewe than what it’s worth. Ours used to go to clean up oil spills, not sure what the buyer does with it now.

#7 carcajou

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 12:42 AM

Ours last year paid for 3 years shearing per ewe, but i did have some range wool in there.



#8 Cult45

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 10:28 AM

Our woolies get sheared yearly but are decent fiber producers. I just didnt have to time to have it graded and bicker with costs or contracts, so have been dumping it all in the trash. But now that I am more established, I might revisit the idea of selling it.



#9 slowzuki

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Posted 07 January 2020 - 11:23 AM

Here you can trade clean fleeces at a woollen mill for yarn, something like 25 lb of fleece for 1 lb yarn if its the type of wool they are buying. Don't know the exact rates off hand. Hard to keep pasture clean enough, a few burdocks will ruin everything.  We use them basically for mowing the rough / poor pasture and cleaning up around sheds etc.

A family member does some shearing on her own and for others flocks. I sheared two shetland sheep 10 years ago and that was enough for me to know its a pain in the butt.
Attached File  869F38D5-6906-4AA6-8CDE-D6BE2DF02D93.jpeg   207.66KB   6 downloads



#10 Cult45

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 04:43 PM

Ours are primarily for meat, but if we can make a few bucks off the wool, thats a bonus.



#11 carcajou

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Posted 18 January 2020 - 05:57 PM

Here you can trade clean fleeces at a woollen mill for yarn, something like 25 lb of fleece for 1 lb yarn if its the type of wool they are buying. Don't know the exact rates off hand. Hard to keep pasture clean enough, a few burdocks will ruin everything.  We use them basically for mowing the rough / poor pasture and cleaning up around sheds etc.

A family member does some shearing on her own and for others flocks. I sheared two shetland sheep 10 years ago and that was enough for me to know its a pain in the butt.
attachicon.gif869F38D5-6906-4AA6-8CDE-D6BE2DF02D93.jpeg

whats with the c clamp?



#12 slowzuki

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Posted 19 January 2020 - 06:29 AM

The c-clamp? Oh the baler monitor is clamped to the loader joystick bracket. Awkward location but was in a hurry last time it moved tractors.
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#13 stack em up

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 11:43 AM

Sold wool this morning, averaged $.10/lb

The sack the wool was in was worth more than the wool. About 225 pounds in a bag....

#14 carcajou

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 12:37 PM

Serious? Sold our range wool in Jan for $ 2.00/lb. Tags and bellys 25 cents/lb
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#15 IHCman

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 12:45 PM

Did the Coronavirus screw up that market also?

 

I sure like wool clothes so I'm glad you guys keep raising them. I helped shear angora goats one time and I rank that up there in one of the top ten worst jobs I've ever done. Stinky buggers.



#16 r82230

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 12:50 PM

Sold wool this morning, averaged $.10/lb

The sack the wool was in was worth more than the wool. About 225 pounds in a bag....

Reminds me of the story of the guy wheeling a wheel barrel of junk/trash out the plant door every week.  They finally figured out he was stealing the wheel barrels.

 

You should have use cheaper bags, keep your cost down. :D

 

Larry


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#17 stack em up

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Posted 11 March 2020 - 01:54 PM

Serious? Sold our range wool in Jan for $ 2.00/lb. Tags and bellys 25 cents/lb


The fella I bought a Heininger remanufactured handpiece from said his bread and butter is selling Merino wool to hand spinners in the Twin Cities. He’s been getting ~ $18/lb, that’s cleaned and carded I believe.

We sell ours to a fella who ships directly to China, said he hasn’t shipped anything in over a year. Chinaman can’t pay he said. “No wool for you!”

#18 Cult45

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 04:27 PM

Showed off a sample to a potential buyer. Too much vegetation. Plus I am not good at shearing the wool into "sheets". Shearing the excess off helps stay cool and for the weathers, they gain more weight through the summer.






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