Asphalt in Hay Barn - Barns, Buildings, and Storage - HayTalk - Hay & Forage Community

Jump to content




Photo
- - - - -

Asphalt in Hay Barn

asphalt floor hay pavement

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 thowle

thowle

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • LocationWestern Kentucky

Posted 31 December 2018 - 05:07 PM

Hey guys, I've heard that asphalt would be the better choice when used in a hay barn as opposed to gravel or concrete.

 

Does anyone here have asphalt in their barn?

 

I was quoted a "base asphalt #57 mixture" and a "surface pavement mix" -- both are way cheaper than concrete -- not entirely sure the difference or what would be the best option, though.

 

Thanks in advance!



#2 MrLuggs

MrLuggs

    Member

  • Members
  • 180 posts
  • LocationStockbridge, Michigan

Posted 31 December 2018 - 05:42 PM

Yep, I have a 4" asphalt floor in my hay barn and love it, no moisture permutation, bottom bales sit right on the asphalt and look as good as the day they were baled when they come up.

 

#57 is courser aggregate with more recycled asphalt, while the surface is finer for a smoother finish.


  • HayMike, JD3430 and thowle like this

#3 thowle

thowle

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • LocationWestern Kentucky

Posted 31 December 2018 - 05:48 PM

Yep, I have a 4" asphalt floor in my hay barn and love it, no moisture permutation, bottom bales sit right on the asphalt and look as good as the day they were baled when they come up.

 

#57 is courser aggregate with more recycled asphalt, while the surface is finer for a smoother finish.

 

Good stuff!  What mix do you have?  4" of the surface mix, or just the #57 base?  Did you have it sealcoated after having it installed?

 

Thanks!



#4 MrLuggs

MrLuggs

    Member

  • Members
  • 180 posts
  • LocationStockbridge, Michigan

Posted 31 December 2018 - 05:57 PM

Mine is 2"/2" for base/surface (after rolling) - I haven't sealcoated mine in the 8 or 9 years I've had it, but likely will if I notice any permeation issues.

 

A couple of things to not with asphalt floors:

- You don't want to store heavy equipment on it if it's got a small contact surface (at least for the first year or so until it fully cures)

- Diesel/hydraulic fluid etc will eat into it if it's left there, so if you're using the barn for equipment storage as well, you will want to ensure you've got buckets/pans under anything that could leak.

- They take a long while to really cure - up to a year before they're 100% set up, while you can store hay on it before then, tractors etc can leave tread/lug marks in it.

 

I'm sure Larry has a few more things to add here, since he just got his floor put in his new barn this year.


  • thowle likes this

#5 endrow

endrow

    Junior Member

  • Members
  • 4301 posts
  • Locationcentral pa

Posted 01 January 2019 - 09:48 AM

For us It did not hold up to the skid loader . At least half our hay barn is semi  commercial type use . Our findings were black top did not produce a perfect bale edge after storage 



#6 thowle

thowle

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • LocationWestern Kentucky

Posted 01 January 2019 - 10:26 AM

Yeah, I actually heard some bad things about the asphalt mixes last night containing too much RAP and liquid AC or lime rock instead of granite.

 

I think I'm just going to pour concrete on half for equipment and work, and then put down plastic and #57 rock where the hay will be.



#7 Hayjosh

Hayjosh

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • 980 posts
  • LocationKalamazoo, MI

Posted 01 January 2019 - 01:16 PM

I have an asphalt driveway that is sealcoated, and the sealcoating is really inexpensive...even professionally. My driveway was installed about 4 years ago now and while it is ok for heavy equipment to drive over it, I can keep my tractor parked on it for a few hours but if the loader is resting on the asphalt, it will leave imprints or gouges on the asphalt. Asphalt gets softer as it gets warmer. If there's not direct sunlight on it as is the case in a barn it might be better.



#8 r82230

r82230

    Hay Master

  • Members
  • 3981 posts
  • LocationThumb of Michigan

Posted 02 January 2019 - 01:25 PM

3" of asphalt (top coat material, not base layer of material) on top of 10-12" of 21AA, all setting on subsoil (removed top soil first), have natural drainage away from 3 sides (one end is basically level with floor, 2" drop).  My asphalt was laid in two courses (lifts?), basically 1 1/2" finished layer at time.  I was told compaction is what is important, with asphalt.

 

All bales stored on edge (un-cut side down), on 80' of asphalt. The last 40' of my shed is 6" concrete floor, this is were I try to concentrate traffic (especially turning).

 

Bales stack directly on asphalt, zero mold problems, placed a layer of straw bales under hay (thank goodness) that were temporarily stacked on concrete, within a week straw bales had mold on bottom.  As did 3 hay bales that I placed on concrete just to check for myself. :huh:

 

BTW, the 6" of concrete had 10-12" of sand put down after topsoil removed.

 

The asphalt guy, told me asphalt doesn't cure, but cools.  Comes out of the plant at over 350 degrees, being it is made of petroleum based products, there is evaporation.  BUT I should see minimal evaporation, being my floor is not in the direct sunlight (he claims asphalt can re-heat in direct sunshine in the summer to over 150 degrees, here in Michigan).  I should never need to coat my floor with anything, for this reason (lack of evaporation), for a long, long time.

 

Leaving impressions/marks in the asphalt with tractor tires does happen, hasn't been a problem since colder weather has arrived here.  I don't have a skid steer, just tractors and telehandler (being the telehandler is the heaviest at over 18,000#, you can guess what leaves impressions the fastest).  I chose to go the telehandler route, because I didn't want to tear up my hay fields with skid steer (I use a 15 bale accumulator/grapple system).

 

I was also told that turning on asphalt tears it up, so I try to have equipment (tire) turning/moving would help reduce this situation.  Seems people have a tendency to turn the steering wheel while vehicle is stationary.

 

One of the 'do overs' at this time, would be I would have used crushed lime stone that my asphalt guy recommended instead of 21 AA.  His told me this after I had the 21AA delivered/rough graded.  I would have saved a few coins, even. :(  The second 'do over', would be 72' wide (instead of 64').  It's surprising how much room it takes to turn stuff around. :o

 

Lastly, my asphalt guy is also a local beef cattle/hay farmer.  Knowing that everything he told me could be questionable at best.  :D

 

I got a lot of good info from the great folks here on HT, their advice/opinions are invaluable. :)

 

What sold me the most on asphalt, is here in Michigan, with a concrete block (or pour wall), they always 'coat' the outside with tar to stop moisture migration.  I believe tar and asphalt are both petroleum products (even possibly closely related).

 

HTH

 

Larry


  • siscofarms and bbos2 like this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: asphalt, floor, hay, pavement

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

× Sponsors