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New Holland self propelled baler


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#1 T.A.Farms

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 05:16 PM

I found a NH 1426 self propelled baler locally, I don't know anything about these things and was wondering if it would be worth getting my hands on. I will be doing about 2000 bales with it a year. Any info on theses would be great

#2 nhbaler282

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Posted 05 November 2017 - 09:30 PM

I have a 1282 and I really like it you do know it is a 16 +18 size bale don't you. They are real handy but it is expensive to repair especially the vari drive. Wish it was close to me I would be interested



#3 Three44s

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Posted 06 November 2017 - 02:40 AM

Welcome TAFarms!

I just acquired a sixth SP (was given a 1425 the other day) and we have been fooling around with them since the spring of ‘16.

Prior to that we were running NH pull PTO balers since ‘69.

Basically NH put the same baler as ther pull types with small changes on top of the same or virtually the same transport over the span of 30 years.

As nh1282 cautions, the varidrive can be a pain but to me the ability to match ground speed to the windrow condition was the prime attraction to these machines in the first place. The trick with the ground drive is to keep it greased, not over greased but adequately greased. You want to follow the instruction placard on the back panel. It suggests greasing each unit in it’s collapsed position, that means restarting the engine and running the speed control to it’s highest setting to grease the sheive on the left.

There are splined shafts and matching splined shelves constituting the varidrive that are no longer available from NH and the only way we have found to get those parts is to find used ones. In our case we have been accumulating whole and nearly whole machines for peanuts. I would have not likely bought new vari drive parts from NH anyway because they were so proud of them, we are talking astronomical prices.

The whole varidrive issue can be put to rest by converting it to a hydrostatic drive and another member of this forum has done just that. He said they became real sweet hearts. I have found that the original system in good shape and kept up is no great shakes. Belt replacement virtually drops off the radar if you employ the trick my “baler guru” taught me.

The way to check that machine you are looking at is to disconnect the spring, slip the belt off so you can try rocking the shelves to check for play. Start the engine and move the drive to different positions and recheck again. Be careful and don’t pinch the belt however .... those belts are 300 bucks a pop! If you do end up buying the SP be sure and stage your up and down shifts. Ie. don’t just stand on the control in one big speed change ... do it in several taps on the lever. Also I refrain from moving the control to change speed for really small sections of varied windrow.

I personally did not like baling with gasoline vs. diesel going into this project but the fuel consumption has not been that bad. Perhaps that 1426 you are looking at is a Perkins diesel? That would be grand!

After so many years door seals don’t seal so well and (more) dirt wants to come into the cab. Get your air cleaned up. Think of Pig Pen from the comic strip Peanuts as you will often look like that with a big dust cloud swirling around your machine. In the short run I bought some self adhering door seal to bridge the gaps and invest in new cab filters, one working and one being cleaned. Remote the cab air intake to a higher level and install a precleaner on top of the new intake location and add an inline booster fan to pressurize the cab even better. A larger filter you add perhaps on top of the cab as a pre filter or primary filter would be even better.

Besides the varidrive section the SP transport has a dry clutch and a mechanical three speed plus reverse, a rear differential housing and a final drive. These components are very trouble free, but agin NH does not support them either so I run Lucas oil additive to stretch their lives. Lots of parts continuity across the spectrum here though. I think the only part that changed are the output stub drive axles when NH went from the 1282 to the 1283’s.

I guess the most notable thing about these SP balers that you will not change is the greater difficulty to work on them or service them. Young, flexible and skinny are great assets. I am none of the above. Running the machine on some relatively thin blocks helps crawling around (under) them.

Compact design helps them be manuverable and trust me they are but you pay the the price at wrench or grease gun time. Further, how long has this machine sat and how dry are those so called “lifetime” bearings?

On two 1283’s we spent $2700 mostly on bearings in 2016 alone and only have one machine to show for it that’s running thus far as we have more to go with the second machine.

I like the visibility. You are looking directly at the knotter and your star wheel and the windrow is directly in front of you. You don’t see the hay inside of the header though. I added a convex mirror to help but then had to add a hand operated by a pull rope brush to periodically clean the mirror and a header light relocation to work with the mirror more effectively.

We had an epic problem with our 1283 that I run and there is a looooong thread about our trials with it here on the forum (do a search if you care to) last year and the beginning of this year. Don’t worry, that 1426 could not do to you what our 1283 was doing to us as to the cause.

I will be glad to answer any other questions that I can and there are a few members with a lot more knowledge than I will ever have.

BTW, your 2000 bales per year is just a warm up for a good SP, no sweat if she’s in shape. You will be surprised how fast they bale in general and even opening a field up becomes a breeze.

Best regards

Three44s
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#4 Three44s

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 09:38 AM

I forgot to mention my issue with the OEM seat.

It was bottoming out on rougher ground on a fairly regular basis and my back had just about had it. On the NH web site it was obvious that it would cost far more than it was worth to rebuild it and gain little.

After passing over an air ride seat from a diesel truck my brother wrecked out, I went to a local truck wrecking yard and they led me to a room full seats and turned me loose!

$50 for any air ride seat in there and nothing older than year 2000!

I came home with a Bostrum 915 in good shape. A current production 915T sells north of $700 currently.

A few bucks for one of these inexpensive 12v mini compressors and I was going to be in business!

My wife and her sisters have been cleaning out their father’s house and sitting on the garage floor all by itself was a booster battery w/ compressor built in. The skinny was nobody wanted it. The battery had gone gunny sack but the compressor still works fine.

Sulfated battery removed ... unit cleaned up and mounted and hard wired all inside the cab it works sweet!

I think I ran the compressor about 15 seconds once every 4 days? . ... that’s fine by me though because that little stinker sounds like a JACKHAMMER!

My guy that runs our bale wagon is jealous, don’t worry as his machine is next ....

Best regards

Three44s
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#5 nhbaler282

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 08:14 PM

Three 44's what is the trick did your baler guru teach you on the varidrive I am still learning this is my first selfpropelled baler I have had it a few years and I am still learning. I like your idea on the air ride seat that one is a winner!! I have bought a 912 NH speedrower waiting on a man to pick it up for me and that will be another learning curve because the self propelled machines were never used in this part of the country so I dont have any experience with them but fixing to learn. I tried to buy a 1283 from a man that I bought the 1282 from but he wont sell it but found another one they all are a long ways from here but they are interesting machines. Last year a friend told me that one of his friends called him and said you want believe what I just saw going down the hwy,it was a man driving a hay baler down the hwy he saaid I know who it had to be.



#6 Three44s

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 10:16 PM

nhbaler282,

What our guru taught us is to take a washer or washers and place it under the main tension bolt on the left set of shieves. This is the bolt with a grease fitting on it. You are compensating for belt wear and I am assuming in a way not achievable with the standard adjustments.

This fellow has owned and ran just about every self propelled NH they made sans the 166 and the 1426 over the better part of six decades. He baled for himself but also custom and also sometimes ran a second SP baler (his wife would run the cab model, while he ran the open station machine) she would run into the night as long as she could but go to her day job by the day.

With all this experience he told me that once he started following the belt wear with washers as he describes, he never bought another belt. Mind you he bought, ran and either sold machines or junked out the machines that wore out along the way. So each of those machines undoubtedly came with a belt.

What I did was to collect washers of various thicknesses, some thin ones included with a suitable inside dimension and try different combinations until we got the right combination. In the end with our machine and our belt we ended up with no washers needed after we found and replaced the bearings in the clutch housing (opposite side from the washer side) that were failing.

Best regards

Three44s
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#7 nhbaler282

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 10:41 AM

  OK thanks Three44's I am going to copy that and put it in my book,I guess he was putting the wahers in there until he got the measurement that the book says,I replaced all the shafts and the sheaves on mine when I restored it and it was expensive but I figures that would last me a lifetime but now I know how to keep it going. THANKS



#8 Three44s

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Posted 09 November 2017 - 08:31 PM

nhbaler282,

An employee that first brought my attention to the washer idea (we are both friends with the guru) said the washer trick is a short cut to a full on by the book adjustment. I was relating a question you posed last year to that effect and he agreed. In effect the washers if needed save your belt from excessive slippage until you are up to taking the time to “do it the right way” or by the book.

We also figured out our guru has been fooling with SP balers around five decades, not six like I posted the other day. My mistake.

You mentioned replacing shafts and shieves on your 1282. How did you source them?

Also if you end up with a 1283 or a 283 for that matter, don’t forget to keep that cable that runs the plunger stop on your radar.

I just acquired a 515 NH and low and behold, a cable runs to the safety .... yuk!

Three44s

#9 nhbaler282

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Posted 10 November 2017 - 10:40 AM

Three44's

  I do remember you telling about that trick last year and I did put a washer on mine and it did help but I didnt know if you had heard of another trick. I ordered all of those parts from my NH dealer a few years back and that might of been the last set NH had I dont know but I saved the old ones and if I need them I am going to see if a machine shop could fix the splines maybe. I do grease them like the book says about changing the positin of them to grease them trying to make these last as long as I can. I think I got the 1283 bought and I will keep a eye on that cable,my 570's have that cable on them too and so far no problem. I am going to raise the bottom of the chamber on the 1283 like I did on the 1282 to make 14=18 inch bales instead of the 16=18 bales it is a job to do but it is worth it.

  Keep teaching us what your baler guru says about his tricks on these self propelled experience is priceless



#10 Three44s

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Posted 11 November 2017 - 09:45 PM

I should have brought the 2 ton!

The guru called, he said bring your pick up, it won’t heavy .... yeah right .... lol!

We finished one of the storage sheds but had to leave some those treasures for next time and the guru said look over here ..... yes, I sure should have brought the 2ton! There in the second shed ... even more goodies!

All I could say was .... We will be back and we will bring the 2 ton! Lol!

Besides the baler parts and even vari drive stuff were hydraulic pumps, motors, cylinders and spools and it all had the rear bumper just about draggin’

Sore backs and all, it was a great day!

Three44s

#11 Tx Jim

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:54 AM

I read on another discussion forum that a NH SP baler recently sold at a Mecum Auction for $28K



#12 somedevildawg

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 07:45 AM

I read on another discussion forum that a NH SP baler recently sold at a Mecum Auction for $28K


Wow.....

#13 Tx Jim

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 08:17 AM

I just found out it was a model 168.



#14 Three44s

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 11:38 AM

Mecum sold two 166’s in September for 11,000 and 11,500 respectively in Iowa and the more recent one for 25,500 in Penn.

Whew!

I’ll stick with six machines for 3.8 K

Three44s

#15 nhbaler282

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 08:51 AM

OK three44's dont keep all those parts for your self spread the wealth down here. LOL



#16 Three44s

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:38 AM

There is a fine line between needy and greedy isn’t there? Lol

Amongst the stuff we had to leave for another trip is what my employee thinks is the remains of a SP forage chopper, specifically the hydrostatic drive off of it. The guru bought the chopper for the engine but the story goes that he saved the drive system for a future conversion to a SP hay baler. My impression but I only glanced at as we had our hands full .... lol ...that it was the pump and motor for a hydro swing hay cutter. We will be back tomorrow and get the skinny!

I am wondering what happened to the OP? We have been keeping his sand box warmed up but he’s MIA.

Best regards

Three44s

#17 bool

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 03:56 PM

Well, I am enjoying reading the discussion anyway, and I am sure others are too. I did a round in a neighbour's 1281 when I was a youngster. Another neighbour had one too. I have always liked the NH SP balers but will probably never own one.

 

Roger


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#18 Three44s

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Posted 13 November 2017 - 09:49 PM

Roger,

Thank you for the kind words.

It’s funny how people decide what machines to buy. Self propelled hay balers never sold in great numbers, I think New Holland sold only about 700 units of the 1283 model. Yet if we consider combines one has to look far and wide to find a combine that is drawn and powered by a tractor.

I don't raise much grain but even if there were a good selection of tow behind combines I would still prefer a self propelled harvester because they have a drive system that allows the operator to match it’s ground speed with the conditions at hand and the operator is in a better position to monitor those conditions as they change and effect changes in operating the machine to optimize it’s production.

All the negatives leveled at SP hay balers, having to maintain another engine, eating dirt etc also apply to combines but there are many sp combines and relatively few sp balers. Go figure.

While I don’t raise much grain to combine, I do generally spend an inordinate amount time on a hay baler and if anything keeping a hay baler within it’s best operating regime is more important than keeping a combine at it’s best feed rate.

A sp combine is certainly more manuverable than a tow behind would be, but in baling hay you are also creating a virtual pylon course if you will in relation to accessing and cleaning up any broken bales or wind dispersed parts of windrows and manuvering to finish out point or short rows.

Just in baling my end or head rows I’d wager my time is cut in half using a sp baler, if I want to back up it is no challenge to look over my shoulder or for a short reversal just glance at my mirror to verify there is not a bale in my path. Further if a bale is there often I can twist the baler around it. But the amount of times I need reverse is also reduced because I can almost clean up 100% on a 90 degree corner with an sp.

Try any of that with a pull baler.

Dirt and dust is a factor with the sp balers but just as it is with combines, well maintained cabs with filtered air pressurizers are the solution. With my allergies I could never handle an open station machine without breaking out one of my air filtered helmet systems, so I tip my hat to the folks in the past who did but it’s not for me.

Best regards

Three44s

#19 nhbaler282

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 06:05 PM

The selfpropelled is the way to go much more movable in tight areas I eat the dust on the 1282 and have worked with open top tractors all my life but luckily my allergies havent been bad yet. Three 44's we cant keep bragging on these selfpropelld balers because the price will go up,I just bought a 1283 about 400 miles from me and waiting on a friend to go get it for me after thanksgiving it is working but has been setting up a while going to reduce the bale size to 14 instead of the 16 as if I dont have enough of projects going on something to work on all the time but cant afford to buy all that fancy new paint but you need to ship those extra parts down here to texas



#20 Three44s

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Posted 15 November 2017 - 11:10 PM

nhbaler282,

Congrats on acquiring that 1283 and I am glad you will get move up to a cab. Watch that sneaky cable issue however.

I see your point we better put a lid on it and just revel in our admiration of self propelled balers quietly ..... lol! The last thing we want do is to trigger a run these machines ... LOL!!

As far as the parts go I better see how this plays out. I have three 1283’s, two 1281’s and a 1425 to dote over.

In our big haul from the guru’s place he is cleaning out we have more than enough stuff to make them all whole, but I will likely not go that far.

We also bagged two complete but different hydrostatic drive systems from the guru. One is the ground drive from a NH forage chopper, the other from a Hesston swather.

Our friend the guru sure saved treasures ... whoooo hooo!

Best regards

Three44s




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