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Market Research - Hay Drying Machine

alfalfa horse small square equipment hay

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#81 Dadnatron

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 07:26 AM

If only they knew what it takes to make hay. You are better off without them but hope you find someone to fill that void. That is a batch of bales. Not every year is going to be the same quality wise otherwise I would not be still putting 1st in the barn when last year I was done before the 4th of July.

 

As a thoroughbred horse owner, I personally don't care what it takes to make hay. Let me explain. 

 

The investment I have in my horses is far and away the most costly part of my farm. So, the 'difficulty' in making hay has no meaning. I'm not going to decrease the feed quality for my investment, because of a rainy summer. 

 

I'm not trying to bash your statement, but want to clarify why so many horse owners might seem overly 'picky' about feed/hay. For some, they just want what they perceive as best, for their animals/friends. For others, like myself, I want what is best for my investment. But... for others, they are just pains in the ass, and little will make them happy. But in all cases, the difficulty in making the product lies with the farmer and his price should reflect what he chooses to sell it for. Then, the buyer can choose from whom to purchase.

 

This is one reason why there is such a massive market for Western grown hay to be shipped into Kentucky and New York. The quality, given climate, is almost always excellent. The cost, to the owners, is worth it. Look up and call Creech Hay sales to see what some owners are willing to pay for a small square.


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#82 Trillium Farm

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 08:16 AM

I wish it was still that way here. Horsey folk here have turned a cold shoulder on Timothy with all the sugar hype. Orchard grass still has very good demand. 

 

Regards, Mike

Gosh, haven't heard that! Good to know.



#83 hillside hay

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 11:33 AM

I wish it was still that way here. Horsey folk here have turned a cold shoulder on Timothy with all the sugar hype. Orchard grass still has very good demand.

Regards, Mike

They'll be back for it
I'm done chasing horsey folks'forage whims. Good Timothy will find a buyer
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#84 FarmerCline

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:06 PM

I wish it was still that way here. Horsey folk here have turned a cold shoulder on Timothy with all the sugar hype. Orchard grass still has very good demand. 
 
Regards, Mike

That is strange......It's not that way here in the Carolinas. Timothy is in very high demand as always. Wish I had some Timothy to sell.
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#85 Vol

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 06:01 PM

They'll be back for it
I'm done chasing horsey folks'forage whims. Good Timothy will find a buyer

 

That's my thoughts......the horsey folk blow like Mr. Breeze. Whatever some of these horse magazines protest, the horsey crowd parrots. One of my better customers was mentioning last summer about some lady horse prophet espousing the negatives of Timothy.....and how horses were becoming more insulin intolerant. I said you got to be kidding me.....I asked her if one person was the last word on horses and horse healthcare? She just looked at me. Like I said earlier, she is a good customer so I did not press it. She bought a gooseneck trailer load of prime Orchard grass just this past Monday. 

 

Regards, Mike


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#86 Chuck

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 08:52 PM

SVFHAY,,, I put 400 bales in each trailer,,, this furnace will supply enough heat for 2 trailers. Each trailer has 2 ten hp fans under the trailer to blow the hot air through the bales.  It will dry small squares or big squares. 30 % in big square takes 24hrs.. In small squares roughly the same or less. The bottom row always dryes first,,, I usually have hay waiting to be dried, so i will take hay out , and re dry top row latter,,,its the hardiest to dry. When I re dry the top rows,,, it takes only 6 hrs and its dry. 


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#87 SVFHAY

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 05:56 AM

Thanks for info. I've had a very similar plan drafted for a few years. Economics never seem favorable and the time needed to manage and load/unload have prevented me from doing it. Conditions this year has my research folder back on my desk.
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#88 Three44s

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 09:35 AM

When I think of hay making, I think of it from my perspective and that is from a western one.

I can visualize and wrap my mind around a machine that takes a windrow, dries it to some lower level and moves through a field until the job is complete. But taking a quantity of bales at a time and drying them in a block is not as easy for me to conceptualize.

But don't take offense to my statements.

I see two distinct paths to the same end.

One is a continuous motion drying a product that is still porous and thus more able to pass air through, and the other has the hay bunched up tight and is in batches and requires additional handling.

From my western perspective I think in terms of landscapes that are more expansive and quantities of forage in greater proportions.

With much more hay for our customers to choose from they can be more price conscious and our operating margins are thinner.

In the east dry hay is likely more scarce and customers have to cough up more money to purchase what they seek.

So it is in that economic environment that artificial drying of hay might be feasible but even then a more efficient method to that end will still win over the long haul because the market place always wins.

Three44s





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