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Women Hay Farmers

women hay farming

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#1 muffntuf

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 02:03 PM

Is there any women on this forum that do hay farming- do not have men to help?  I am drawing up a business plan and I wondered if there were any women that are doing the farming?

 

Thanks!



#2 hillside hay

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 03:23 PM

Just curious why not employing men is a prerequisite. I hire whoever is willing to work. Some years it's mostly women/ young ladies. Other years young men or semi retired folks. I will add the young ladies seem to have a little more initiative these days. Strength and endurance is where they start to fall apart. Spirit is willing for sure. I'm currently working to eliminate the hands on portion so that should be easier on the help and my bottom line. Don't know if that helps.
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#3 Lostin55

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 05:00 PM

I am definitely not female, but both of my partners and most of the hired help has been.
Is it a thing now to separate the genders in farming?
Welcome to Haytalk. Most certainly an interesting username.
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#4 somedevildawg

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 07:51 PM

Lol, i done went and had my giggle box turned over.....welcome to haytalk...

#5 muffntuf

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 07:55 PM

No not at all- what I meant was are their any women who own their own acreage- do not have a husband or significant other that helps with their farm - and particularly in the hay production.  I have a friend out in NY that lost her husband about 3 years ago and she does the haying now.  But I don't know too many other women that do this by themselves.  My main concern is the equipment repairs and maintenance.  I have done haying off and on my whole life- but am considering buying acreage and putting up a hay mix.  My only reservation is the repairs and maintenance because that isn't something that was covered when growing up or my off and on on different farms.  I was handed a tractor with whatever attachments and I just went and did.


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#6 somedevildawg

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 08:08 PM

Can always buy new....get ur pocketbook....er, purse ready tho....equipment is expensive.
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#7 ozarkian

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 08:17 PM

I know two female hay producers. I don't think they see maintenance and repair as gender specific. They repair and maintain what they can and pay for the rest. As a matter of fact, that's what I do


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#8 PaMike

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 08:25 PM

Routine maintenance isnt that bad. Read the ops manual and follow it. Grease and lubricate. Keep an eye on things and get it checked out BEFORE it flys apart...


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#9 Teslan

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 08:29 PM

Keep up with the maintenance and the repairs will be less. But never the less repairs you shall have sometime. If you don't want or can't do them find a good ag equipment mechanic or pay a dealership. I don't and can't do a lot of the big repairs myself. So have to call the experts.
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#10 LukeS

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 08:54 PM

Yeah I don't know of any Woman hay farmers, I have three sisters that help when needed but it is my dad, brother and I that run all the equipment. I also work for local JD dealer so we fix all of our stuff. Where in MN are you? 



#11 Lostin55

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 09:19 PM

An interesting story.
Last summer, one of the gals that I mentioned was running a stacker, I was out of state, and the rear end went out of it.
We are talking shrapnel through the two speed and a broken axle.
She had never torn down a rear end before, neither had I for that matter. We talked on the phone, she came up with a game plan, and ultimately had it back in the field in a couple of days. She sourced the parts, recruited some help, and got it done.
The moral of the story is that just because you haven't done it doesn't mean that you cannot do it. It's all just nuts, bolts, hydraulics, and electrical.
People have a way of helping out when you need it most also.
You have already found one of the greatest resources around, in this website. There are people from just about every manufacturer on here, from salesmen to technicians. They have walked many people from all walks of life through many different repairs.
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#12 hillside hay

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 09:23 PM

I don't see any reason why you couldn't.
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#13 muffntuf

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 09:24 PM

Thanks for answering.  Next question - I live in MN by the way- East Central.  Does anyone use a tedder - does it cut down on drying time for you?

 

Also- the new NH Discbine - MaxMower. I know its not super new, but I was scoping out haybines- looks like this is pretty cool and you can kick hay out as wide as the discbine fin- which means a little less drying time.  Am I seeing that right?



#14 somedevildawg

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 10:16 PM

Yes it does equate to better dry down with wider width....not sure about the Tedder, hay making is very regional, everyone here uses a Tedder, purty essential tool for us in the south. It will definately decrease drying time here, by 24-48 hour
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#15 deadmoose

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 10:32 PM

[quote name="muffntuf" post="684514" timestamp="1493691867"]Thanks for answering. Next question - I live in MN by the way- East Central. Does anyone use a tedder - does it cut down on drying time for you?



East Central probably not terribly far from me. I wouldn't be without a tedder here. I see more and more in use every year. Still a lot of people around who do not know what one is. HERE. It takes a day or more off for me. Depending on conditions. Caveat I put a 12 foot cut into maybe a 4 foot windrow. I learned quick after I bought that mower that a tedder is a necessity for me. Youtube and sites like this are your friend when it comes to maintenance and repairs. Getting to know knowledgeable neighbors helps out too.

As long as you are smart enough to know your own limitations and when to ask or pay for help, not really sure where gender comes into play. IMHO. And I hope you aren't trying to make a small fortune making hay here. Unless you are starting with a large one! :) Hay sure is cheap here these days. But, buying it isn't near as challenging and rewarding as making it.

Good luck. Welcome to Haytalk. More knowledge here than you can shake a stick at.
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#16 azmike

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 05:46 AM

Capability is more a maturity issue than gender. A female worker with child in tow plus early 20's baggage is no where near prepared as a woman who has become more organized and structured towards work. The best "hands" I've worked with is a woman that owns a dependable vehicle, kids are grown and gone, has evolved past fashion concerns and female specific monthly needs, tells the old man where the refer is in case she isn't home exactly at meal time. An all around dependable worker only can't hold up a truck by hand to change a tire!

Really who doesn't think their Mom was not the best & most capable person ever??

** note: the worst thing to happen to "workers" is the pocket Smart phone! Male, female or whatever! 


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#17 r82230

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 07:39 AM

Male or female, an honest, local independent mechanic is one of the best 'tools' to have in your back pocket.  Next, no matter what color dealership, a knowledgeable service manager/parts manager, would be tool #2, IMHO.

 

I have three older sisters that could do as much or more than a lot of other folks (male or female).  Physical strength isn't the only attribute needed to do any type of farming and I would not put it at #1, by a long shot (give me a person with some common sense instead).

 

Larry


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#18 azmike

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 08:16 AM

Maybe Ms. muffntuf is a good fisher person??



#19 Wethay

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 09:16 AM

Testosterone doesn't automatically come with mechanical aptitude. I've had a couple of women help around the farm and I definitely call them long before I will call my brother. Being aware of what you know and what you don't makes a big difference. Many men think they must know how to fix it, after all it's got an engine and I'm a man, so therefore I know how. I believe an attitude of I haven't done a repair like this, but I sure can try goes a long way.  


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#20 muffntuf

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 01:05 PM

Deadmoose - Thanks so much!  Hay is more spendy in this state then say - New York.  Very interesting -been watching markets for or 11 years now in MN and surrounding states.  Very interesting.  I am a hay consumer as well- and 2010 was the year of drought - my hay bill was 2.5 times the normal that year. 

 

Tedder- yes I am thinking it could cut at least 1 day off.  I also was looking at the discbine maxmower- which can cut a swath as wide as the mower- and folks say that also cuts 1 day.  In our area- we need that extra time.


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