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Stumping the Natural Way?


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#1 RuttedField

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Posted 09 July 2016 - 03:13 PM

I am clearing 30 acres of forest to make way for a new field. To the East there is 8 acres that used to be a former field (1800-1920). Then in the middle there is about 12 acres of wet ground. Then on the west side there is 10 acres of sloped ground that was never anything but forest...ever. By law I can cut all the wood I want on any of it, but I cannot stump it for farming. Logging is a different story. (stupid)

 

So yesterday I had a Basswood tree that I was going to save. No real reason, I just like basswood lumber and was going to save it to saw on my own sawmill. Next to it was an big ash tree that I wanted to cut for a Mat Log. As it came crashing down, the top of the ash caught the basswood and uprooted the thing right out of the ground. Drat...but from that an idea was born.

 

Hardwood stumps rot really fast, especially in wet soil, but hemlock not so fast. The wetland area is teeming with hemlock, and a few are already uprooted from the wind tossing them about. Since I live on a very big hill, what if I cut all the hardwood and other softwoods around the hemlock. Would this let the hemlocks with their long sweeping boughs take the brunt of the wind and uproot them from the thin soil?

 

Would this work? Would it be legal since I am not stumping with a bulldozer, simply letting the wind do its thing by manipulating what is removed from the forest canopy and exposed to the wind? There is no law that says I cannot harvest trees with the stumps still attached.


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#2 glasswrongsize

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Posted 09 July 2016 - 08:18 PM

Sounds like a work-around to me!! :)

If that don't work, head on down to the Baskin Robins and get a few people that are....uh, um...over on axles ;)  and invite them to your "Tire Swing Park"; that might uproot the more stubborn ones. 

 

I gathered by the context that "stumping" is removing the stumps? In another post of yours, you mentioned that you "paid stumpage"? In my neck of the woods, neither of these

terms are familiar to me...?


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#3 RuttedField

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 07:04 AM

Paying stumpage just means that I pay a landowner a specified price per unit. It come from logging speak, but is applied to haying too. Lets say I cut wood off your land, or cut hay, as a logging or haying contractor, I pay you "stumpage" for the wood or hay that is cut. It is often expressed in cords or by the bale. Lets say you had 100 acres and I small square baled it and got 1000 bales. If I paid you $2 per bale, I would give you $2000 in "stumpage".

 

Stumping means just as you said, extracting the stump from the ground.

 

I am not sure how the laws really work regarding woodland wetlands anyway. I can log it all I want which includes removing stumps to make "logging roads", but as soon as you say it is for tillable farmland...whoa...now everything changes. Trees can be uprooted by the wind, uprooted as I did by felling a tree into another tree, or by BMW's (that is Big Maine Women...in case you never heard the term before, and there is no shortage of them here in Maine I assure you), but bulldoze them for food and its against the law! Stupid.


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#4 Thorim

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 02:18 PM

I'd do what you can legally do and then let mother nature take its course smiles



#5 RuttedField

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Posted 10 July 2016 - 06:50 PM

I would try and have my wife swing from a tire swing to uproot those ole hemlocks, but atlas she is very petite. I'd post a picture of her, but that is frowned upon on here (an inside joke). She is however, an "import", all the way from New Hampshire...which explains the rather non-traditional heavy-on-the-hoof weight of most BMW's (Big Maine Women)


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#6 atgreene

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Posted 11 July 2016 - 08:32 PM

I'm suprised you can't stump it. Never heard of an issue converting to tillable land. Usually ag is exempt from most rules for land clearing, with the exception of set backs for water bodies.

#7 r82230

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Posted 12 July 2016 - 10:28 AM

Hardwood stumps rot really fast, especially in wet soil, but hemlock not so fast. The wetland area is teeming with hemlock, and a few are already uprooted from the wind tossing them about. Since I live on a very big hill, what if I cut all the hardwood and other softwoods around the hemlock. Would this let the hemlocks with their long sweeping boughs take the brunt of the wind and uproot them from the thin soil?
 
Would this work? Would it be legal since I am not stumping with a bulldozer, simply letting the wind do its thing by manipulating what is removed from the forest canopy and exposed to the wind? There is no law that says I cannot harvest trees with the stumps still attached.

You might want to 'help' the remaining standing trees out on falling over by themselves. 

 

Did you ever notice that when a wind storm hits a city and some trees blow over.  Seems one side of there roots has been 'pruned', by the side walk or street, allowing the rest of the tree's roots to act like a hinge. 

 

So................. on the prevailing wind side of said trees, something was to 'cut' the roots, your trees might 'fall over' a little faster for some un-known reason during a wind storm. ;)

Larry 
 






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